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Undergraduate Studies

Undergraduate Course Descriptions: Fall 2014

Catalan
Portuguese
Spanish 100 AND 200-LEVEL
Spanish 300-LEVEL
Spanish 400-LEVEL


  • Courses, times, days, rooms, and/or instructors are subject to change.
  • Please review the entire course description. Multiple descriptions may be listed for courses with multiple sections.

  • CATALAN

    CATALAN COURSES:

    HISP-C 105 Intensive Catalan Language (3 credits)
                #16209     11:15A-12:05P    MWF    BH 317     STAFF         
    This class meets with HISP-C 491 and HISP-C 494

    HISP-C 491  Elementary Catalan for Graduate Students (3 credits)
                #16210     11:15A-12:05P    MWF   BH 317      STAFF
    This class meets with HISP-C 105 and HISP-C 494
    HISP-C 491 is for graduate students only

         Globalization has unified economies, torn down political barriers, and turned local spaces into tourist attractions. In this context, Barcelona, the capital of Catalonia, has become a successful global city that offers a balanced combination of vibrant economic activity and Mediterranean relaxed lifestyle. Its cultural centers, its architectural and artistic heritage, its sunny beaches, and its cool nightlife have also turned Catalonia into one of the world’s most fashionable tourist destinations. The names of some modern Catalan creators are familiar to all: Gaudí, Miró, Dalí, to name just three.

         At the heart of this success lies an enigmatic element: the presence and vitality of the Catalan language. In the last decades, Catalan, spoken by approximately 10 million people, has both maintained a high cultural prestige and increased its public presence remaining a key political tool in Catalonia and the other Catalan-speaking areas.

         This introductory course to Catalan language and culture aims at providing a basic knowledge of the Catalan language. The intensive study of Catalan, geared primarily at reading knowledge, but not limited to it, will be complemented with a cultural overview of Catalonia and the Catalan-speaking lands (Catalunya, País Valencià, Illes Balears, Andorra, Catalunya Nord, and the city of l’Alguer in Sardinia). The case of Catalonia and its unique and exemplary characteristics will be a perfect occasion to undertake more general reflections on the intricate relations between language, culture, politics, and globalization.

    Note:  For Undergraduate Spanish Majors, HISP-C 105 may count as your 300/400 level elective.
    ___________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-C 494  Individual Readings in Catalan Studies  (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  Consent of the department.  By permission only. Call (812) 855-8612.

         Globalization has unified economies, torn down political barriers, and turned local spaces into tourist attractions. In this context, Barcelona, the capital of Catalonia, has become a successful global city that offers a balanced combination of vibrant economic activity and Mediterranean relaxed lifestyle. Its cultural centers, its architectural and artistic heritage, its sunny beaches, and its cool nightlife have also turned Catalonia into one of the world’s most fashionable tourist destinations. The names of some modern Catalan creators are familiar to all: Gaudí, Miró, Dalí, to name just three.

         At the heart of this success lies an enigmatic element: the presence and vitality of the Catalan language. In the last decades, Catalan, spoken by approximately 10 million people, has both maintained a high cultural prestige and increased its public presence remaining a key political tool in Catalonia and the other Catalan-speaking areas.

         This introductory course to Catalan language and culture aims at providing a basic knowledge of the Catalan language. The intensive study of Catalan, geared primarily at reading knowledge, but not limited to it, will be complemented with a cultural overview of Catalonia and the Catalan-speaking lands (Catalunya, País Valencià, Illes Balears, Andorra, Catalunya Nord, and the city of l’Alguer in Sardinia). The case of Catalonia and its unique and exemplary characteristics will be a perfect occasion to undertake more general reflections on the intricate relations between language, culture, politics, and globalization.

    Note:  For Undergraduate Spanish Majors, HISP-C 494 may count as your 300/400 level elective.

    HISP-C 494     #15500  by permission only  11:15A-12:05P   MWF   BH 317   STAFF      


    PORTUGUESE

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    HISP-P 100 Elementary Portuguese I (4 credits)

    Introduction to present-day Portuguese, with an emphasis on communication in a highly interactive classroom. The course is designed to provide knowledge of basic grammar and to develop fundamental communication skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing--with particular emphasis on oral expression. Students will be encouraged to speak only Portuguese in class from day one.

    HISP-P 100   #8694    10:10A-11:00A      MTWR    BH 229     STAFF

    ___________________________________________________________________________________ 

    HISP- P 135 Intensive Portuguese (4 credits) 

    For students from secondary school placed into the second semester of first‑year study or those with a strong background in Spanish or another Romance Language.  Content of P100 and P150 covered at an accelerated pace.  See description of P100.  Credit not given for both P135 and P150.  This course may count for the Spanish major to fulfill the 300/400-level elective.   This course cannot be used to fulfill any portion of the Spanish minor.

    HISP-P 135     #12180     9:05A-9:55A    MTWR    BH 307  STAFF
    Note:  This class meets jointly with P491.

    ___________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP- P 135 Intensive Portuguese (4 credits) 

    For students from secondary school placed into the second semester of first‑year study or those with a strong background in Spanish or another Romance Language.  Content of P100 and P150 covered at an accelerated pace.  See description of P100.  Credit not given for both P135 and P150.  This course may count for the Spanish major to fulfill the 300/400-level elective.   This course cannot be used for any portion of the Spanish minor.

    HISP-P 135     #14553     9:05A-9:55A    MTWR     BH 238    STAFF

    ___________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-P 200 Second‑Year Portuguese I (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: P150 or equivalent.

    Continuation of P150 or P135. This course is designed to provide understanding of more advanced grammar structures with continued emphasis on fundamental communication skills with more focus on communicative exercises, and more intensive study of selected readings.
              
    HISP-P 200      #8695    10:10A-11:00A    MWF   BH 232     STAFF

    ___________________________________________________________________________________ 

    HISP-P 317 Reading & Conversation in Portuguese   (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: P200-P250 or equivalent

    Taught in Portuguese, this course emphasizes conversational and reading skills using plays, short stories, poetry, and novels from Brazil, Portugal, and Lusophone Africa.  Students will also be introduced to the basics of literary appreciation.            

    HISP-P 317   #33764       11:15A-12:05P    MWF     BH 140     STAFF
    Note:  This course is offered jointly with HISP-P 492.

    ___________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-P 400   Literatures of the Portuguese-Speaking World I  (3 credits)

    The first of a two-part survey of literature in Portuguese, this course will cover works written from the medieval period through romanticism in Brazil and Portugal. The emergence of an African and African-Brazilian literature will also be discussed. Representative literary authors and works serve as the basis for interdisciplinary and cross-cultural commentary of important social, political and historical issues, including imperialism and overseas expansion, nation building and revolution.
    This course carries CASE GCC and A & H distribution credit.

    HISP-P 400   #30404      1:00P-2:15P    MW  BH 235  Prof. Luciana Namorato
    Note:  Above class meets with HISP-P 498 and HISP-P 500.

    ___________________________________________________________________________________ 

    HISP-P 411 Portugal: The Cultural Context  (3 credits)

    Founded as a kingdom in 1143, Portugal is one of Europe’s oldest countries. Its seafaring past, imperial and diasporic history, and long twentieth-century dictatorship have shaped present-day Portugal in profound ways. This course focuses on contemporary Portugal: on the radical changes the country has experienced in the last couple of decades. Our attempt will be to understand these recent political, social, and cultural developments within the country’s historical context. We will begin with the colonial wars in Africa, the April 1974 revolution, and the demise of Salazar’s forty-year long regime, examine the democratic transition that followed, and look at the country’s current position vis-à-vis the European and international contexts. Some of the issues discussed include: the role of women in Portuguese society, emigration, economic crises, and the more controversial debates over abortion and gay rights. Our objective will be to analyze how these political and social circumstances emerge in the country’s literary, artistic, and social manifestations; how in a short amount of time these changes have transformed generations, value systems, and social codes. Examining a selection of the country’s contemporary fiction, film, architecture, and painting against this historical background, will help us appreciate the complex relationship between these cultural expressions and Portuguese politics and society. The course is taught in English and is open to undergraduate and graduate students.

    This course carries CASE GCC and  A & H distribution credit.

    HISP-P 411     #30410    2:30P-3:45P   TR   BH240   Prof. Estela Vieira
    Above course is combined with HISP-P 498, P511 and  EURO-W 406/W 605.

    _________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-P 491 Elementary Portuguese for Graduate Students  (3 credits)

    An accelerated introduction to the structure of the Portuguese language, covering in one semester content matter usually reviewed in two semesters.  This course is taught in Portuguese.

    HISP-P 491    #8696     9:05A-9:55A   MTWR    BH 307    STAFF

    Note:  Above section meets jointly with HISP-P 135, #12180.

    _________________________________________________________________________________ 

    HISP-P 492 Reading Portuguese for Graduate Students  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: P491 or equivalent.

    An advanced course on Portuguese composition and grammar, designed to refine students’ knowledge of several language skills.  Emphasis on writing, with special attention to syntax and vocabulary development and usage.  Students will write compositions, increasing in length and complexity as the semester progresses.

    This course is a continuation of P491 and is taught in Portuguese.

    HISP-P 492    #8697    11:15A-12:05P     MWF    BH 140     STAFF

    Note:  Above section meets jointly with HISP-P 317.

     ________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-P 494 Individual Readings in Luso-Brazilian Literature  (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department. 

    May be repeated for a maximum of up to 6 credit hours as long as each registration covers a different topic.

    HISP-P 494    #8698    PERMISSION   Arranged    Professor Luciana Namorato
    _________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-P 498  Portuguese Honors Seminar  (3 credits)  

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Portuguese.  This HISP-P 498, section #8699 meets with HISP-P 400 and HISP- P 500  Literatures of the Portuguese Speaking World I.

    HISP-P 498  #8699  BY PERMISSION    1:00P-1:15P  MW   BH 235  Prof. Luciana Namorato
    Note: Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission.   kallgood@indiana.edu
    Note: This course carries CASE GCC and A & H distribution credit.

    See course description for HISP-P 400 Literatures of the Portuguese Speaking World I below:

    The first of a two-part survey of literature in Portuguese, this course will cover works written from the medieval period through romanticism in Brazil and Portugal. The emergence of an African and African-Brazilian literature will also be discussed. Representative literary authors and works serve as the basis for interdisciplinary and cross-cultural commentary of important social, political and historical issues, including imperialism and overseas expansion, nation building and revolution.
    _________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-P 498  Portuguese Honors Seminar  (3 credits)  

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Portuguese.  This HISP-P 498, section #31404 meets with HISP-P 411 and HISP- P 511 and EURO-W 406/W605.

    HISP-P 498  #31404  BY PERMISSION    2:30P-3:45P  TR   BH 240  Prof. Estela Vieira
    Note: Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission.   kallgood@indiana.edu
    Note:  This course carries CASE GCC and A & H distribution credit.
    See course description for HISP-P 411 Portugal:  The Cultural Context below:

    Founded as a kingdom in 1143, Portugal is one of Europe’s oldest countries. Its seafaring past, imperial and diasporic history, and long twentieth-century dictatorship have shaped present-day Portugal in profound ways. This course focuses on contemporary Portugal: on the radical changes the country has experienced in the last couple of decades. Our attempt will be to understand these recent political, social, and cultural developments within the country’s historical context. We will begin with the colonial wars in Africa, the April 1974 revolution, and the demise of Salazar’s forty-year long regime, examine the democratic transition that followed, and look at the country’s current position vis-à-vis the European and international contexts. Some of the issues discussed include: the role of women in Portuguese society, emigration, economic crises, and the more controversial debates over abortion and gay rights. Our objective will be to analyze how these political and social circumstances emerge in the country’s literary, artistic, and social manifestations; how in a short amount of time these changes have transformed generations, value systems, and social codes. Examining a selection of the country’s contemporary fiction, film, architecture, and painting against this historical background, will help us appreciate the complex relationship between these cultural expressions and Portuguese politics and society. The course is taught in English and is open to undergraduate and graduate students.

    ___________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-P 499  Honors Research in Portuguese  (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-P 498
    By Permission Only:  Call (812) 855-8612 or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu

    Approval of the Director of Portuguese Studies and the Chair of the Honors Committee.

    HISP-P 499   #16490   PERMISSION    Arranged   Professor Luciana Namorato


    Spanish 100 & 200-LEVELS

    HISP-S 100 Elementary Spanish  (4 credits)  
    By permission only.  Call (812) 855-8612 or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu

    The course presents a four‑skills approach to Spanish with an emphasis on critical thinking skills. Students will practice speaking in small groups in class as well as reading and discussing materials in Spanish. Grading is based on exams, homework, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Enrollment in S100 is restricted to those with less than 2 years of high school Spanish or with the consent of the department. All others must enroll in S105. The next course in the sequence for HISP-S 100 students would be HISP-S 150 Elementary Spanish II.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then fall 2014 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 105  First Year Spanish (4 credits)

    This introductory course is for students with 2 or more years of high-school study and covers the essential grammar and vocabulary of first-year Spanish. This course presents a four-skills approach to Spanish with an emphasis on critical thinking skills.  Students will practice speaking in small groups in class as well as reading and discussing materials in Spanish.  Grading is based on exams, homework, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Homework load is substantial. Credit not given for both HISP-S 105 and HISP-S 100 or HISP-S 105 and HISP-S150.The next course in this sequence is HISP-S 200 Second-Year Spanish I. 

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then fall 2014 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 150 Elementary Spanish II (4 credits)  
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 100

    This course continues the work of S100 with continued emphasis on all four skills and on critical thinking skills. Students will practice speaking in small groups in class, as well as reading and discussing materials in Spanish. Grading is based on exams, homework, compositions, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. The next course in this sequence is HISP-S 200 Second-Year Spanish I.

    Note: HISP-S 150 is for those students who took HISP-S 100 Elementary Spanish here at IUB or took an equivalent course at a regional campus or other university.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then fall 2014 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 200 Second‑Year Spanish I    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 105 or HISP-S 150 or equivalent. 

    This course reviews some of the basic structures studied in the first year, and examines them in greater detail. Emphasis
    remains on the four skills and on critical thinking skills. Cultural readings and a mystery story are also included. Grades are based on exams, homework, compositions, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Homework load is substantial. The next course in this sequence is HISP-S 250 Second-Year Spanish II.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then fall 2014 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 250 Second‑Year Spanish II  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 200 or equivalent. 

    This course continues the work of HISP-S 200 with a continued emphasis on the four skills and on critical thinking skills.  Short literary readings are also included. Grades are based on exams, homework, compositions, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Homework load is substantial. After successful completion of this course, the foreign language requirement is fulfilled for schools that require a 4th -semester proficiency. For those students who wish to go on for a minor or major in Spanish, the next course to take would be HISP-S 280 Spanish Grammar in Context.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then fall 2014 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    S265  Topics in Hispanic Literature in Translation   (3 credits)
    Variable Title: Literature and Culture of the Americas after the Cuban Revolution 

    This course analyzes responses to the Cuban Revolution—both celebratory and critical—in Spanish America and the U.S., focusing as well on the links to other revolutionary movements and on connections among revolutionary and antiracist struggles worldwide.  We examine both cultural production in Spanish America and the U.S. in the years following the Revolution, and the political and cultural institutions through which it was promoted.

    The success of the Cuban Revolution of 1959 sparked hope throughout Spanish America of establishing political, economic, and cultural autonomy from U.S. necolonialism, and from the longstanding legacies of European colonialism.  The Revolution also prompted significant cultural activity (in the form of literary competitions, cultural centers, publications, etc.) for which supporters of the revolution from Spanish America, the U.S., and Europe traveled to the island.  We will study the cultural activity that emerged from this moment, including representations of the Cuban Revolution in Spanish American and U.S. literature and films.  Among these are works by authors such as Julio Cortázar and Carlos Fuentes, who participated the movement known as the Boom in Spanish American fiction, and who were united—in the early years—in their support for Cuba, as well as Pablo Neruda and Cristina García, among others, and films such as “Memories of Underdevelopment,” “Memories of Overdevelopment,” and “Juan of the Dead.”  We will also read works by and about Beat Generation poets, who traveled to Spanish America out of solidarity with the Revolution and interest in the region’s literature, as well as studying the visits to Cuba of performers such as Dizzy Gillespie and Josephine Baker.

    Additionally, we will examine international political responses to the Revolution.  On the one hand, there is the Tricontinental Conference of African, Asian, and Latin American Peoples, which took place in Havana in 1966, in which representatives from around the world sought to coordinate their decolonizing efforts and also to challenge racism and segregation.  On the other, we will explore how in the U.S., concern about the spread of socialism in Latin America prompted both public officials and private citizens to develop outreach programs (some involving covert governmental funding) aimed at courting Latin American writers and intellectuals in an effort to show the U.S. and democracy in a positive light. 

    Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, presentations, writing assignments (including a final essay), and exams.

    HISP-S 265  #30436    9:30A-10:45A   TR   BH 219  Prof. Deborah Cohn
    Above class meets with AMST-A 202.


    HISP-S 280  Spanish Grammar in Context (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: S250 or equivalent.

    The overall goal of this course is to provide students with the language skills necessary to pursue upper division course work in Spanish. The main focus is on the development of formal linguistic skills through explicit grammar instruction and review, vocabulary building exercises, reading original texts by contemporary authors, and exploring the link between literature and culture through writing and conversation.
    The main objective of S280 is to strengthen students’ comprehension and application of the most challenging grammatical structures for second language learners within a meaningful language context. This objective will be accomplished with a thorough review and practice of problematic grammatical structures, the analysis of these and other structures in the context provided by a series of literary readings and selections from an audio book, and the application of these structures in writing and discussion sessions. The course will be conducted in Spanish.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/   Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then fall 2014 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    Spanish 300-LEVEL

    HISP-S 308 Composition and Conversation in Spanish (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.  Co-requisite: may be taken concurrent with HISP-S 280.

    The objective of this course is to develop students’ oral and writing abilities in Spanish.  Students will develop writing skill in Spanish by learning and practicing the main components of different writing styles: description, narration, exposition, and argumentation.  Students will learn compositional elements that provide cohesion and coherence in both formal and informal writing styles.  Students will develop their oral skills by watching and discussing a number of critically acclaimed films from different Spanish-speaking countries which deal with a variety of cultural, social, and political issues.  To achieve the goal of improving oral proficiency, students will participate in various in-class discussions and debates on controversial topics presented in the films.  By the end of this course, students will be able to write in a variety of formal and informal writing styles and to discuss a wide range of topics.

    To see active sections available for fall 2014 go to schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, chose fall 2014.  We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 315  Spanish in the Business World  (3 credits) 
    Prerequisite: S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    El objetivo de este curso es promocionar el entendimiento cultural internacional en el mundo de los negocios por medio del estudio del lenguaje comercial y del conocimiento de sus códigos y costumbres. Este objetivo se persigue de dos formas. Por un lado, se aspira a familiarizar al estudiante con el lenguaje comercial escrito y hablado y se trabajará con documentos variados -- cartas comerciales, descripciones de trabajo, anuncios, formularios bancarios y de importación y exportación, etc. --. Además, los estudiantes aprenderán a leer, escribir y traducir documentos comerciales y practicarán conversaciones sobre diversas situaciones de negocios. Por otro lado, se introducirá al estudiante en el conocimiento de las costumbres, protocolo y prácticas culturales propias del mundo comercial hispano. Por medio de casos prácticos se analizarán estereotipos culturales y se cuestionarán comportamientos y conductas éticas del comercio internacional. En definitiva, se buscará sensibilizar al estudiante a conocer, entender, respetar o criticar prácticas culturales del mundo de negocios hispano. Este curso se dictará únicamente en español. El prerrequisito de este curso es S280.

    HISP-S 315  #8787    9:05A-9:55A   MWF   BH 237          STAFF


    HISP-S 317 Spanish Conversation & Diction (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This class meets five times a week. It includes contrastive study of Spanish and English pronunciation.  Intensive controlled conversation correlated with readings, reports, debates, and group discussions.  S317 may be repeated once for credit.  S317 is NOT open to native speakers of Spanish.

    HISP-S 317   #12181        9:05A-9:55A      Daily    BH 206          STAFF


    HISP-S 324 Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Cultures (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This course offers an introduction to the cultural history of Spain and Latin America, from the conquests of Spain and America through the twenty-first century. Our main text is Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes’s book El espejo enterrado, complemented by films, artworks and shorter literary and historical texts. Students learn about the key events and the fundamental ideas and concerns that have shaped Hispanic cultures across the centuries, such as processes of conquest and colonialism, nation formation, modernization, and the changing roles of religion, race and gender. Through discussions, written compositions and exams, students learn to critically read and understand Hispanic cultures, and to develop original arguments in written and spoken Spanish.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    To see active sections available for fall 2014 go to schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, chose fall 2014.  We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.      

    This course provides a general introduction to the field of Hispanic Linguistics and establishes a foundation in the major areas of linguistics in order to prepare students for future courses in Linguistics. After an introduction on the nature of language and to the field of linguistics, the course provides a description of the sound system of Spanish through the study of phonetics and phonology. This unit includes the presentation of the principles of phonetic transcription as well as important phonological processes. Next, basic concepts in morphology, the structure of words, will be examined, including a description of the general principles of the formation of nouns, adjectives, adverbs, and verbs. Then, in order to examine how words combine at the sentence level, we will study the basic concepts of sentence structure (syntax) and its connection to meaning (semantics). The course ends with an overview of some of the basic concepts of language use in context (pragmatics) and linguistic variation (sociolinguistics).

    This course carries CASE N&M distribution credit.
               
    HISP-S 326    #8788     11:15A-12:30P     TR    BH 322        Prof. César Félix-Brasdefer
    Note:  This class is for Hutton Honors students and meets with a HISP-S 326 non-honors section.  

    HISP-S 326  Permission Needed   #15130   11:15A-12:30P     TR   BH 322    Prof. César Félix-Brasdefer
    Note:  This class meets with the Honors section for S326 and is taught toward the Honors students.  ________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

        Esta introducción general a la lingüística española ayuda al estudiante comprender y apreciar el sistema lingüístico que empleamos para codificar el mundo que nos rodea y para comunicarnos entre nosotros. Tras una breve introducción a la materia en la primera semana, nos ocupamos de la naturaleza del lenguaje (lenguaje, lengua, y lingüística) y estudiaremos la interpretación del significado con respecto al sonido al nivel de la palabra. A continuación, examinamos sistemáticamente la estructura de la oración en español (la sintaxis) y cómo esta estructura se relaciona con la interpretación semántica. Entonces, se examinarán el sistema de los morfemas (la morfología) y el de los sonidos de los dialectos principales del español  (la fonética y la fonología).
        Después de tratar los temas de la semántica, la sintaxis, la morfología, la fonética y la fonología, emplearemos el conocimiento adquirido para estudiar el español desde el punto de vista histórico (la variación temporal), regional (la variación regional) y social (la variación social y el bilingüismo). Dentro de este marco exploraremos ciertos aspectos de la diversidad de la lengua española y veremos cuáles son los factores que influyen la creación, el mantenimiento y la disolución de tal diversidad.

     This course carries CASE N&M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 326   #14556     1:00P-2:15P     TR    BH 240     Prof. J. Clancy Clements

    ________________________________________________________________________ 

    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or Equivalent

    1. Course description:

    This course is an introduction to basic concepts and methodology used in Spanish Linguistics. The main goal of the course is to provide students with the opportunity to learn the tools of linguistic analysis and to apply them to the study of Spanish. Attention will be given to different levels of analysis in linguistics including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and language variation. Class time will be divided between lecture, problem-solving exercises, and discussion. Evaluation will be based on exams, class participation, homework, experiments, and other assignments.

    2. Prerequisite:  S280, S310 or equivalent.

    3. Goals:
    After successful completion of this course, the student will:

    4. Topics:

     This course carries CASE N&M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 326   #12722     4:00P-5:15P     MW    BH 149   Prof. Manuel Díaz-Campos
    _______________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    Introduces the basic concepts of Hispanic linguistics and establishes the background for the future application of linguistic principles.  The course surveys linguistic properties in Spanish, including phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax.  Additional introductory material on sociolinguistics, pragmatics, second language acquisition, and historical linguistics will be included.  This course carries CASE N&M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 326  # 33497      8:00A-8:50A       MWF       SW 103       STAFF 
    HISP-S 326  #15505      8:00A-9:15A          TR         BH 235        STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #17083       9:30A-10:45A       TR         BH 236        STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #8789       10:10A-11:00A     MWF       BH 314        STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #33128     11:15A-12:05P     MWF       BH 137        STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #11835        1:00P-2:15P        TR         BH 214        STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #16255        2:30P-3:45P        TR         BH 322        STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #15506        4:40P-5:30P      MWR       BH 208        STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #12542        6:40P-7:40P      MWR       BH018         STAFF
    ________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 328  Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)    
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent

    This course will help students to develop tools needed for more advanced study of Hispanic literatures through the reading and analysis of selected literary texts from Spain and Spanish America.  One of the key aspects that you should take away from the course is an appreciation of different genres as well as a reflection on the concept of genre itself.  In this section of the course, the following three genres will be covered: narrative fiction, poetry and theater.  The course will also highlight the importance of socio-historical context to literary works by presenting texts from different historical periods.  In the study of the selected texts, the course will introduce you to basic terms of narratological, poetic, dramaturgical and rhetorical terms used in the study of literature, which are the bases of “close reading”.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328   #14420    11:15A-12:30P  TR    BH 240   Prof. Reyes Vila-Belda
     ________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 328  Introduction to Hispanic Literature  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This course is intended as an introduction to Latin American and Spanish literature. Through the study and honing of different critical terms, the course will also serve as an introduction to literary analysis. The development of close reading skills will be coupled with an attention to the historical conditions in which the texts were written and what is at stake in our own interpretations.  While the course will primarily focus on poetry, prose (short stories and a short novel), and theater, we will make brief forays into other genres such as the contemporary crónica in Latin America, microrrelatos, children’s literature, and comics. Students’ grades will be based on brief writing assignments, three short papers, two exams, and several short creative projects.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328  #14417    11:15A-12:30P   MW   AD A152   Prof. Jonathan Risner
    ________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 328 Introduction to Hispanic Literature  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This course provides students with an introduction to the analysis of Hispanic literature and culture. As an introductory course, its main objectives are to provide students with a survey of Hispanic literary and cultural production and to foster basic concepts and skills through which to interpret, analyze, and communicate (both orally and in writing) about literature and culture. While our main focus will be on essays, narrative, poetry, and drama, we will also expand our archive to include some films. Through in-class discussions and written work (textual analyses and argumentative essays) we will learn to develop grounded interpretations of literary and cultural texts by analyzing their content (story, ideas, themes), the ways through which content is structured and expressed by the text’s form, and the relationship between a text and its socio-political context. The course’s approach stems from the proposition that by better understanding the way a text creates meaning and engages with the ideas, changes, and preoccupations of its time, we will also be able to become more critical readers/viewers. The analytical tools that students learn in this course will also prepare them for more advanced classes in literature and culture. 

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328  #14421   HONORS   1:00P-2:15P   MW   BH 335    Prof. Andrés Guzmán
    Note:  This class meets with the HISP-S 328 #16256 non-honors section. 

    HISP-S 328   #16256                  1:00P-2:15P    MW   BH335    Prof. Andrés Guzmán
    Note: This class meets with the HISP-S 328 #14421 Honors section and will be taught toward the honors students.

    ________________________________________________________________________________

     HISP-S 328 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This course will help students develop tools needed for more advanced study of Hispanic literatures through the reading and analysis of selected literary texts from Spain and Spanish America.  One of the key aspects that you should take away from the course is an appreciation of different genres as well as a reflection on the concept of genre itself.  In this section of the course, the following three genres will be covered: narrative fiction, poetry and theater.  The course will also highlight the importance of socio-historical context to literary works by presenting texts from different historical periods.  In the study of the selected texts, the course will introduce you to basic terms of narratological, poetic, dramaturgical and rhetorical terms used in the study of literature, which are the bases of “close reading”.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328     #14418         9:30A-10:45A        TR        BH 233             STAFF
    HISP-S 328     #18265         9:30A-10:45A        TR        BH 140             STAFF
    HISP-S 328     #14693       10:10A-11:00A      MWF      SY 022              STAFF
    HISP-S 328     #14419         1:00P-2:15P          TR        BH 015             STAFF
    HISP-S 328     #18258         1:00P-2:15P          TR        BH 233             STAFF
    HISP-S 328     #14422         2:30P-3:45P          TR        SY 105             STAFF
    HISP-S 328     #14423         2:30P-3:20P         MWF     BH 336            STAFF
    HISP-S 328     #14425         2:30P-3:20P         MWF     BH 235            STAFF
    HISP-S 328     #14424         4:00P-5:15P          TR        BH 232            STAFF
    _______________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 334  Panoramas of Hispanic Literature  (3 credits)   
    Prerequisite:  S328 or equivalent.

    This section of S334 offers a historical introduction to the literature of Latin America written in Spanish.  The course is structured as a survey spanning several time periods and literary movements, from Independence to the present.  Students will read, analyze, and discuss a broad selection of texts by canonical authors paying particular attention to their historical and literary context.  This course aims to offer students a general overview of the literary history of the region.  In doing so, it will also help students further improve their analytical skills as well as their writing and speaking abilities in Spanish.  Class will be conducted in Spanish.

    This course carries CASE A& H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 334   #15087  (Latin Amer)    2:30P-3:45P    TR    BH 105    Prof. Alejandro Mejías-López
    _______________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 334  Panoramas of Hispanic Literature  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S328 or equivalent.                                                       
    The objective of this course is to offer an introduction to the history of Spanish literature. This panoramic course is intended to help students expand on their knowledge of authors, literary movements, and Spanish culture and history more broadly, while developing their skills in literary analysis, and their writing and speaking abilities in Spanish. Students will read, analyze, and discuss a broad selection of texts of different genres. The class will focus on representative canonical poetry, prose, and dramatic texts from the Early Modern period to the twentieth century. We will pay particular attention to the historical and political context of the literary work and study how notions of gender and social class are represented in Spain across the ages. Class discussion and assignments will be in Spanish. 
    This course carries CASE A& H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 334    #15089   (Spain)    4:00P-5:15P     TR      BH 137  STAFF

    Spanish 400-LEVEL

    HISP-S 411  SPAIN:  The Cultural Context  (3 credits)                                         CULTURE
    Prerequisite:  Complete one course from S324, S328, S331, S333 or S333

    “Constructing Contemporary Spain”

    What is it that makes Spain "Spain"?  What images and/or stereotypes make up our imagined collage of this country?  How do we define its cultures and its cultural production?  This course takes a critical look at our own constructions of Spain and "Spanish", seeking to build a more complex understanding of its cultures, while providing tools to facilitate future explorations.  We will consider historical circumstances and current rewritings of the past that define contemporary Spain, such as the experience and cultural memory of the Spanish Civil War, the Franco Regime, and the Spanish Transition to democracy.  We will also discuss issues dealing with notions of gender and sexuality in the twentieth century, nationalisms and historical autonomies, ETA, race and migrations, and constructions of gypsy culture.  In addition to understanding the construction of contemporary Spain, one of the main goals of the course is to provide you with tools to analyze cultural materials and manifestations, to “read” culture critically in this course and enable you to apply those tools in contexts beyond the classroom.

    In analyzing Spanish culture, we will work primarily with Spanish films and literature.  "Literature" will be taken broadly to include fiction and poetry, newspapers and magazines, and critical articles.  We will also use music, the visual arts, and architecture as we sketch a new picture of Spain.

    Class discussion and assignments will be in Spanish.  Some readings are in English.  Many films will be subtitled in English and will be viewed by the student outside of class.  Course evaluation will likely be based on class participation, short analytical writing assignments, a midterm exam, and a final paper.

    This course is taught in Spanish and carries CASE A & H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 411  #11136       4:00P-5:15P       MW        BH 319      Prof. Melissa Dinverno
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498, #17939, Readings for Honors.

    _______________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S412 Spanish America:  The Cultural Context (3 credits)                             CULTURE
    Prerequisite:  Complete one course from S324, S328, S331, S333 or S334

    Topic: Representations of Violence in Latin America.

    In this course we will study a variety of short stories, non-fiction novels, testimonios and films to analyze 20th and 21st century representations of violence in Latin America in Cuba, Colombia, Mexico, and Central America. We will look closely at the economic and political history of each country and then compare how fiction, non-fiction, and art have responded to state and guerrilla violence as well as to violence related to narco-trafficking. A focus point of our discussions will be how violence might be seen alternatively as a fact of life or a fact of culture. Texts by Gabriel García Márquez, Fernando Vallejo, Yuri Herrera, and others.

    This course is taught in Spanish and carries CASE A & H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 412    #11718      8:00A-9:15A       TR       BH 214           Prof. Anke Birkenmaier
    Note:  This course meets with HISP-S 498, #17948, Readings for Honors.          
    _______________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 417  Hispanic Poetry (3 credits)                                                            LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    Poetry is often considered a difficult literary genre, an intricate form of writing divorced from social concerns and detached from the historical periods in which it is produced. The objective of this course is to read and analyze representative Hispanic poetic texts from 19th and 20th century (from Bécquer, Rosalía de Castro, Rubén Darío, Antonio Machado, among others) reflecting on the language, writing practices and literary forms, and situating the poems into artistic and literary movements.  In addition, but equally important, we will bridge poetry in connection with the historical, social and political preoccupations of each period, looking carefully at how poetic texts responded and were engaged with their main issues of their times, such as gender, nation formation and national/regional identity, or the Spanish civil war.
    The class will be entirely conducted in Spanish.
    This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    HISP-S 417   #30442      1:00P-2:15P    TR    BH 314       Prof. Reyes Vila-Belda
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498, #18579, Readings for Honors.  _______________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 425 Spanish Phonetics  (3 credits)                                                 LINGUISTICS
    Prerequisite: S326 or equivalent

    This course studies on the sound system of Spanish.  Topics include the articulatory system, the characteristics and description of Spanish sounds, the patterns of Spanish sounds, the historical development of modern Spanish from Latin and the variation of the Spanish sound system.  Attention will also be given to differences between Spanish and English sounds.  A secondary goal of the course is a more native-like pronunciation as a result of a deeper understanding of how the Spanish sound system works.  Course evaluation is based on homework assignments, a class project and presentation, and three exams. 

    This class carries CASE N&M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 425    #20070        1:00P-2:15P      TR      LH 030       Prof. Erik Willis
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498, #20071, Reading for Honors

    _______________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 427  The Structure of Spanish     (3 credits)                                     LINGUISTICS
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent
    This course is an introduction to the grammatical structure of Spanish, with particular attention to the structure of morphology (word formation) and syntax (sentence formation). It will examine the grammatical properties of nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, and the pronominal system of Spanish. It will then look at the principles that govern the internal structure of simple and complex sentences from both a syntactic and pragmatic perspective. Some of the topics that will be examined in this course include word order, negation, tense/aspect/ mood, speech act verbs, and semantic and pragmatic meaning. The course will end with an overview of syntactic cross-linguistic variation across varieties of Spanish in Spain and Latin America.
    This class carries CASE N & M distribution credit

    HISP-S 427  #18289       2:30P-3:45P     TR    BH 317        Prof. César Félix-Brasdefer
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498, #17956, Readings for Honors.

    _______________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 429  Spanish Sociolinguistics and Pragmatics  (3 credits)                LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title: Sociolinguistics Variation Spanish Speaking World
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent

    1. Course Description:       
    This undergraduate course provides an introduction to the basic concepts in sociolinguistics. Sociolinguistics focuses on the symbolic value of language as an expression of group identity based on region, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, age, or other ways of defining group affiliation. Notions such as speech community, sociolinguistic variable, phonological and syntactic variation, and field methods, will be included. The course also surveys other related topics such language in contact, bilingualism and Spanish in the US., Spanish as heritage language, language attitudes and language identity, language and the law, language and age,  and language and gender.  We will focus on research examining the use of Spanish in Latin America and Spain as well as in the U.S. Class time will be divided in lectures, discussion, and analysis of problem solving cases. The evaluation will be based on participation, homework activities, experimental activities, and exams.

    2. Prerequisite:
    S326: Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics.

    3. Goals:
    After successful completion of this course, the student will:

    This class carries CASE N & M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 429    #16938      1:00P-2:15P    MW      BH 140      Prof. Manuel Díaz-Campos
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498, #8792, Readings for Honors.

    _______________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 430  The Acquisition of Spanish (3 credits)                                               LINGUISTICS

    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent.                                                     

    This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of the acquisition of Spanish. Concepts such as interlanguage, error analysis, stages of development, language transfer and language universals will be explored. The course will also trace development from Behaviorist theories to more current approaches such as Cognitivist, Functionalist and Variationist approaches to learner language. The focus of the class will be on learners of Spanish and all application activities will include examples of second language Spanish. Time will be dedicated to the analysis of structures that present challenges to learners from all levels of grammar. Class time will be divided in lectures, discussion, and practical hands-on activities designed to apply theoretical knowledge to practice. Students will be evaluated based on participation, in-class and homework activities, examinations, and a final project.

    This class carries CASE N & M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 430    #18298        9:30A-10:45A      TR     BH 314     Prof. Kimberly Geeslin
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498, #17916, Readings for Honors.

    HISP-S 430  #33498       11:15A-12:30P        TR     BH 245     Prof. Kimberly Geeslin

    _______________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 450  Don Quijote  (3 credits)                                            LITERATURE
    Prerequisite: S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    This course explores the richness and complexity of Miguel de Cervantes’s Don Quijote, Parts I and II. We will investigate the interplay between this masterpiece and the socio-historical worlds of early modern Spain; questions of human existence, literary tradition and self-consciousness in art; and the critical reception of the work.

    Evaluation:

    Midterm exam                                     25%
    Final exam                                          25%
    Written assignments                            35%
    Class participation and preparation       15%   

    The course will be conducted in Spanish.  This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    HISP-S 450   #30448      9:30A-10:45A      MW       BH 139       Prof. Catherine Larson
    Note: This class meets with HISP-S 498, #8791, Readings for Honors. 

    _______________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 473  Hispanic Literature & Literary Theory  (3 credits)              LITERATURE
    Prerequisite: S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    “Memory Studies and the Negotiation of the Past in Democratic Spain”

    Theories of cultural memory, trauma and the narration of the past have come to occupy a crucial place in the field of literary studies, and, in the past 20 years, in Hispanic literary studies in particular.  As traumatic local and global current and past events are broadcast widely through television, film, newspapers, and literature, for example, we continue to struggle with both how to narrate them, as well as the profound implications that our narrative choices have for ourselves and others.  Increasingly over the past 15 years, the debate on cultural memory, traumatic experience and the narration of the past has taken on a particular urgency in Spain.  Prior to Francisco Franco’s death and especially since the early years of democracy, the writing of the recent past has been at the forefront of Spanish politics, society and cultural production.  How should Spain’s past of Civil War and of the repression of the subsequent dictatorship be narrated in contemporary society?  What place do the ghosts of the past have in the formation of a “new” national identity, in a politics of reconciliation or rejuvenation, in a new cultural landscape?  Debates over these and related questions have played out in the cultural landscape time and again in recent years and have now taken on a more urgent tone as the recuperation of this painful past has taken shape in efforts to unearth graves of the Civil War and dictatorship. 

    This course will first study fundamental aspects of theories that ground Memory Studies.  We will then use that knowledge to analyze the way that writers and directors have dealt with issues of memory, history and the collective negotiation of Spain’s difficult and contentious past.  Focusing on recent texts, we will examine the varied positions that these intellectuals have formulated and the ways in which they have negotiated theoretical concepts such as witnessing, cultural memory, and post-memory in their work.  Some of the questions we will deal with may include:  What role does culture play in the construction of the past?  What place have trauma and witnessing been given in talking about Spain’s relationship to the Civil War and Francoism?  How does the “ghostly” manifest in contemporary discussions of memory in and on Spain?  How does Spain’s painful past affect those who never experienced it and what claim to that past do younger generations have?

    Course assignments and discussion are in Spanish.  Theoretical and historical readings will mainly be in English, literary readings and films will be in Spanish (many films are also subtitled in English).  Films will be viewed outside of class.  Course evaluation will likely include a combination of active class participation, oral presentation, analytical essays and final paper.

    This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    HISP-S 473      #30454       2:30P-3:45P      MW     BH 319    Prof. Melissa Dinverno
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498, #17920, Readings for Honors.
    _______________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 474 Hispanic Literature & Society  (3 credits)                  LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    Las tres culturas en la literatura medieval.  This course will examine literary representations of Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Spanish texts from the medieval to the early Renaissance period.  Primary readings will include selections from a number of classic works.  Authors from the period often depicted and fictionalized relationships and interactions with the confessional “other” that are problematic, threatening, and characterized by violent conflict.  But they also composed poems and stories about trans-confessional encounters that emphasize, or even idealize what are perceived as shared experiences, values, and beliefs.  A coursepack of secondary readings will provide a larger cultural and historical context for discussing imaginative poetry and prose, dating from the tenth to the sixteenth century.  Requirements include short essays, a midterm, and a final.  All aspects of the course will be conducted in Spanish. 

    This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    HISP-S 474     #30460      11:15A-12:30P     TR   BH 214    Prof. Ryan Giles
    Note:   This class meets with HISP-S 498, #17927.
    _______________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 479  Mexican Literature  (3 credits)                                   LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    This course will explore key texts and literary trends in 20th century Mexican literature.  We will read novels, essays, short stories, poetry, theater, and film in dialogue with their historical context, from the Porfiriato and the lasting impact of the Mexican Revolution (1910-20) to contemporary issues regarding neoliberalism, migrations, post-nationalism and globalization.  Assignments will include presentations, short papers, and a longer final paper.  Class will be conducted entirely in Spanish.

    This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    HISP-S 479    #30466     4:00P-5:15P     TR     BH 105    Prof. Alejandro Mejías-López
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498, #20214.
    ________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 494    Individual Readings in Hispanic Studies  (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  Consent of the department.  Permission required, call (812) 855-8612.

    This course is by authorization only.  This course is used only in emergencies pertaining to graduating seniors who are short credit hours for graduation.  This course may be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.  It may not be used as one of the course requirements for the major or minor.

    HISP-S 494      #8790     By Permission Only      Arranged       Professor Ryan Giles

    _______________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                       CULTURE
    Variable Title:  SPAIN: The Cultural Context
    Prerequisite:  Complete one course from S324, S328, S331, S333 or S333

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #17939 meets with HISP-S 411 #11136.  If you are leaning toward culture for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #17939   By Permission   4:00P-5:15P  MW     BH 319      Prof. Melissa Dinverno
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note: This course is taught in Spanish and carries CASE A & H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    The following description is for HISP-S 411  SPAIN: The Cultural Context:

    “Constructing Contemporary Spain” What is it that makes Spain "Spain"?  What images and/or stereotypes make up our imagined collage of this country?  How do we define its cultures and its cultural production?  This course takes a critical look at our own constructions of Spain and "Spanish", seeking to build a more complex understanding of its cultures, while providing tools to facilitate future explorations.  We will consider historical circumstances and current rewritings of the past that define contemporary Spain, such as the experience and cultural memory of the Spanish Civil War, the Franco Regime, and the Spanish Transition to democracy.  We will also discuss issues dealing with notions of gender and sexuality in the twentieth century, nationalisms and historical autonomies, ETA, race and migrations, and constructions of gypsy culture.  In addition to understanding the construction of contemporary Spain, one of the main goals of the course is to provide you with tools to analyze cultural materials and manifestations, to “read” culture critically in this course and enable you to apply those tools in contexts beyond the classroom.

    In analyzing Spanish culture, we will work primarily with Spanish films and literature.  "Literature" will be taken broadly to include fiction and poetry, newspapers and magazines, and critical articles.  We will also use music, the visual arts, and architecture as we sketch a new picture of Spain.

    Class discussion and assignments will be in Spanish.  Some readings are in English.  Many films will be subtitled in English and will be viewed by the student outside of class.  Course evaluation will likely be based on class participation, short analytical writing assignments, a midterm exam, and a final paper. ______________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                              CULTURE
    Variable Title:  Spain America: The Cultural Context
    Prerequisite:  Complete one course from S324, S328, S331, S333 or S333

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #17948 meets with HISP-S 412 #11718.  If you are leaning toward Hispanic Studies in culture for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #17948   By Permission    8:00A-9:15A  TR    BH 214      Prof.  Anke Birkenmaier
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note:  This course carries CASE A & H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    The following description is for HISP-S 412 Spanish America:  The Cultural Context:

    Topic: Representations of Violence in Latin America.

    In this course we will study a variety of short stories, non-fiction novels, testimonios and films to analyze 20th and 21st century representations of violence in Latin America in Cuba, Colombia, Mexico, and Central America. We will look closely at the economic and political history of each country and then compare how fiction, non-fiction, and art have responded to state and guerrilla violence as well as to violence related to narco-trafficking. A focus point of our discussions will be how violence might be seen alternatively as a fact of life or a fact of culture. Texts by Gabriel García Márquez, Fernando Vallejo, Yuri Herrera, and others.

    _______________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                              LITERATURE
    Variable Title:  Hispanic Poetry
    Prerequisite:  S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #18579 meets with HISP-S 417 #30442.  If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #18579   By Permission    1:00P-2:15P  TR     BH 314     Prof.  Reyes Vila-Belda
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note:  This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    The following description is for HISP-S 417 Hispanic Poetry:

    Poetry is often considered a difficult literary genre, an intricate form of writing divorced from social concerns and detached from the historical periods in which it is produced. The objective of this course is to read and analyze representative Hispanic poetic texts from 19th and 20th century (from Bécquer, Rosalía de Castro, Rubén Darío, Antonio Machado, among others) reflecting on the language, writing practices and literary forms, and situating the poems into artistic and literary movements.  In addition, but equally important, we will bridge poetry in connection with the historical, social and political preoccupations of each period, looking carefully at how poetic texts responded and were engaged with their main issues of their times, such as gender, nation formation and national/regional identity, or the Spanish civil war.

    The class will be entirely conducted in Spanish.

    _______________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                                  LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title:  Spanish Phonetics
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #20071 meets with HISP-S 425 #20070.  If you are leaning toward Linguistics for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #20071   By Permission    1:00P-2:15P  TR     LH 030     Prof. Erik Willis
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note:  This course carries CASE N & M distribution credit.

    The Following description is for HISP-S 425 Spanish Phonetics:

    This course studies on the sound system of Spanish.  Topics include the articulatory system, the characteristics and description of Spanish sounds, the patterns of Spanish sounds, the historical development of modern Spanish from Latin and the variation of the Spanish sound system.  Attention will also be given to differences between Spanish and English sounds.  A secondary goal of the course is a more native-like pronunciation as a result of a deeper understanding of how the Spanish sound system works.  Course evaluation is based on homework assignments, a class project and presentation, and three exams. 

    _______________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                                  LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title:  The Structure of Spanish
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #17956 meets with HISP-S 427 #18289.  If you are leaning toward Linguistics for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498   #17956   By Permission    2:30P-3:45P   TR    BH 317     Prof. César Félix-Brasdefer
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note:  This class carries CASE N&M distribution credit.

    Description for HISP-S 427 The Structure of Spanish follows:
    This course is an introduction to the grammatical structure of Spanish, with particular attention to the structure of morphology (word formation) and syntax (sentence formation). It will examine the grammatical properties of nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, and the pronominal system of Spanish. It will then look at the principles that govern the internal structure of simple and complex sentences from both a syntactic and pragmatic perspective. Some of the topics that will be examined in this course include word order, negation, tense/aspect/ mood, speech act verbs, and semantic and pragmatic meaning. The course will end with an overview of syntactic cross-linguistic variation across varieties of Spanish in Spain and Latin America.
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    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                                  LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title:  Sociolinguistics Variation Spanish Speaking World
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #8792 meets with HISP-S 429 #16938.  If you are leaning toward Linguistics for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498   #8792   By Permission      1:00P-2:15P   MW    BH 140      Prof. Manuel Díaz-Campos
    Note: Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu
    Note:  This class carries CASE N & M distribution credit.

    Description for HISP-S 429 Sociolinguistics Variation Spanish Speaking World:

    1. Course Description:       
    This undergraduate course provides an introduction to the basic concepts in sociolinguistics. Sociolinguistics focuses on the symbolic value of language as an expression of group identity based on region, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, age, or other ways of defining group affiliation. Notions such as speech community, sociolinguistic variable, phonological and syntactic variation, and field methods, will be included. The course also surveys other related topics such language in contact, bilingualism and Spanish in the US., Spanish as heritage language, language attitudes and language identity, language and the law, language and age,  and language and gender.  We will focus on research examining the use of Spanish in Latin America and Spain as well as in the U.S. Class time will be divided in lectures, discussion, and analysis of problem solving cases. The evaluation will be based on participation, homework activities, experimental activities, and exams.

    2. Prerequisite:
    S326: Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics.

    3. Goals:
    After successful completion of this course, the student will:

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    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                                  LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title: The Acquisition of Spanish
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #17916 meets with HISP-S 430 #18298.  If you are leaning toward Linguistics for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498   #17916   By Permission     9:30A-10:45A   TR    BH 314     Prof. Kimberly Geeslin
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note:  This class carries CASE N&M distribution credit.

    Description for HISP-S 430 The Acquisition of Spanish follows:

    This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of the acquisition of Spanish. Concepts such as interlanguage, error analysis, stages of development, language transfer and language universals will be explored. The course will also trace development from Behaviorist theories to more current approaches such as Cognitivist, Functionalist and Variationist approaches to learner language. The focus of the class will be on learners of Spanish and all application activities will include examples of second language Spanish. Time will be dedicated to the analysis of structures that present challenges to learners from all levels of grammar. Class time will be divided in lectures, discussion, and practical hands-on activities designed to apply theoretical knowledge to practice. Students will be evaluated based on participation, in-class and homework activities, examinations, and a final project.

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    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                              LITERATURE
    Variable Title:  Don Quijote
    Prerequisite:  S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #8791 meets with HISP-S 450 #30448.  If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #8791   By Permission 9:30A-10:45A   MW   BH 139     Prof. Catherine Larson
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note: This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    Description for HISP-S 450 Don Quijote follows:  This course explores the richness and complexity of Miguel de Cervantes’s Don Quijote, Parts I and II. We will investigate the interplay between this masterpiece and the socio-historical worlds of early modern Spain; questions of human existence, literary tradition and self-consciousness in art; and the critical reception of the work.

    Evaluation:

    Midterm exam                                     25%
    Final exam                                          25%
    Written assignments                            35%
    Class participation and preparation       15%   

    The course will be conducted in Spanish.

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    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                              LITERATURE
    Variable Title:  Hispanic Literature & Literary Theory
    Prerequisite:  S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #17920 meets with HISP-S 473 #30454.  If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #17920   By Permission    2:30P-3:45P  MW    BH 319     Prof. Melissa Dinverno
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note:  This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    The following description is for HISP-S 473 Hispanic Literature & Literary Theory:

    “Memory Studies and the Negotiation of the Past in Democratic Spain”Theories of cultural memory, trauma and the narration of the past have come to occupy a crucial place in the field of literary studies, and, in the past 20 years, in Hispanic literary studies in particular.  As traumatic local and global current and past events are broadcast widely through television, film, newspapers, and literature, for example, we continue to struggle with both how to narrate them, as well as the profound implications that our narrative choices have for ourselves and others.  Increasingly over the past 15 years, the debate on cultural memory, traumatic experience and the narration of the past has taken on a particular urgency in Spain.  Prior to Francisco Franco’s death and especially since the early years of democracy, the writing of the recent past has been at the forefront of Spanish politics, society and cultural production.  How should Spain’s past of Civil War and of the repression of the subsequent dictatorship be narrated in contemporary society?  What place do the ghosts of the past have in the formation of a “new” national identity, in a politics of reconciliation or rejuvenation, in a new cultural landscape?  Debates over these and related questions have played out in the cultural landscape time and again in recent years and have now taken on a more urgent tone as the recuperation of this painful past has taken shape in efforts to unearth graves of the Civil War and dictatorship. 

    This course will first study fundamental aspects of theories that ground Memory Studies.  We will then use that knowledge to analyze the way that writers and directors have dealt with issues of memory, history and the collective negotiation of Spain’s difficult and contentious past.  Focusing on recent texts, we will examine the varied positions that these intellectuals have formulated and the ways in which they have negotiated theoretical concepts such as witnessing, cultural memory, and post-memory in their work.  Some of the questions we will deal with may include:  What role does culture play in the construction of the past?  What place have trauma and witnessing been given in talking about Spain’s relationship to the Civil War and Francoism?  How does the “ghostly” manifest in contemporary discussions of memory in and on Spain?  How does Spain’s painful past affect those who never experienced it and what claim to that past do younger generations have?

    Course assignments and discussion are in Spanish.  Theoretical and historical readings will mainly be in English, literary readings and films will be in Spanish (many films are also subtitled in English).  Films will be viewed outside of class.  Course evaluation will likely include a combination of active class participation, oral presentation, analytical essays and final paper.

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    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                                LITERATURE
    Variable Title:  Hispanic Literature and Society
    Prerequisite:  S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #17927 meets with HISP-S 474 #30460.  If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #17927   By Permission   11:15A-12:30P  TR    BH 214     Prof. Ryan Giles
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note: This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    The following description is for HISP-S 474 Hispanic Literature and Society:

    Las tres culturas en la literatura medieval.  This course will examine literary representations of Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Spanish texts from the medieval to the early Renaissance period.  Primary readings will include selections from a number of classic works.  Authors from the period often depicted and fictionalized relationships and interactions with the confessional “other” that are problematic, threatening, and characterized by violent conflict.  But they also composed poems and stories about trans-confessional encounters that emphasize, or even idealize what are perceived as shared experiences, values, and beliefs.  A coursepack of secondary readings will provide a larger cultural and historical context for discussing imaginative poetry and prose, dating from the tenth to the sixteenth century.  Requirements include short essays, a midterm, and a final.  All aspects of the course will be conducted in Spanish. 

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    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors  (3 credits)                                LITERATURE
    Variable Title:  Mexican Literature
    Prerequisite:  S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #20214 meets with HISP-S 479 #30466.  If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #20214   By Permission     4:00P-5:15P  TR    BH 015     Prof. Alejandro Mejías-López
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note: This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    The following description is for HISP-S 479 Mexican Literature:

    This course will explore key texts and literary trends in 20th century Mexican literature.  We will read novels, essays, short stories, poetry, theater, and film in dialogue with their historical context, from the Porfiriato and the lasting impact of the Mexican Revolution (1910-20) to contemporary issues regarding neoliberalism, migrations, post-nationalism and globalization.  Assignments will include presentations, short papers, and a longer final paper.  Class will be conducted entirely in Spanish.

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    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                    LITERATURE
    Variable Title: Hispanic Culture through Drama
    Prerequisite: S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #17933 meets with HISP-S 495 #17912.  If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #17933   By Permission  1:15A-12:30P  MW  BH 229    Prof. Catherine Larson
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note: This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    The following description is for HISP-S 495 Hispanic Culture through Drama:

    This course approaches Hispanic drama from early times to the present, with texts (one-acts and full-length dramas) from both sides of the Atlantic. Through the careful critical analysis of those plays, you will gain an appreciation for the thematic, stylistic, and structural properties that characterize dramas from different literary periods and cultures. In addition to reading, writing, and talking about these plays, you will participate in performance exercises related to the theater in general and to selected scenes from plays studied throughout the semester. The class will culminate in dramatic readings in our own Readers’ Theater. You will not have to memorize lines, but you will need to know your scenes well. Please be assured that you will not be graded on your acting talent. Final grades will be based on careful reading of the material, thoughtful contributions to class discussions, exams and written assignments, involvement in the dramatic exercises, and careful preparation of the final performance. This course will be taught in Spanish. Representative plays include:

    Spanish Theater          
    Anonymous (Middle Ages), “El auto de los Reyes Magos”
    Cervantes, “El retablo de las maravillas”
    Lope de Vega, La dama boba
    Tirso de Molina, El burlador de Sevilla
    Calderón de la Barca, La vida es sueño
    Moratín, El sí de las niñas
    Buero Vallejo, El tragaluz or Las meninas

    Spanish American Theater
    Barros Grez, Como en Santiago
    Gambaro, Información para extranjeros or El campo
    Roepke, “Una mariposa blanca”
    Carballido, “El censo”
    Garro, “Un hogar sólido” y La dama boba
    Torres Molina, “Extraño juguete”

    US Latino Theater

    López, “Simply María or The American Dream”

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    HISP-S 499 Honors Research in Spanish  ( 1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  Approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.   
    BY PERMISSION ONLY.  Call (812) 855-8612

    Majors doing honors in Spanish would register for this class after they have completed S498 and while they are writing their honors thesis.  Contact Karla Allgood via email at kallgood@indiana.edu or see in person in BH 844 for permission arrangements.

    HISP-S 499  #8793      By Permission Only    Arranged          Professor Ryan Giles

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