Skip to main content
Indiana University Bloomington
  • People  |
  •  
  •  

collage of photos

Undergraduate Studies

Undergraduate Course Descriptions: Fall 2018

Catalan
Portuguese
Spanish 100 AND 200-LEVEL
Spanish 300-LEVEL
Spanish 400-LEVEL


  • Courses, times, days, rooms, and/or instructors are subject to change.
  • Please review the entire course description. Multiple descriptions may be listed for courses with multiple sections.

  • CATALAN

    HISP-C 105 Intensive Catalan Language  (3 credits)

    Globalization has unified economies, torn down political barriers, and turned local spaces into tourist attractions. In this context, Barcelona, the capital of Catalonia, has become a successful global city that offers a balanced combination of vibrant economic activity and Mediterranean relaxed lifestyle. Its cultural centers, its architectural and artistic heritage, its sunny beaches, and its cool nightlife have also turned Catalonia into one of the world’s most fashionable tourist destinations. The names of some modern Catalan creators are familiar to all: Gaudí, Miró, Dalí, to name just three.

    At the heart of this success lies an enigmatic element: the presence and vitality of the Catalan language. In the last decades, Catalan, spoken by approximately 10 million people, has both maintained a high cultural prestige and increased its public presence remaining a key political tool in Catalonia and the other Catalan-speaking areas.

    This introductory course to Catalan language and culture aims at providing a basic knowledge of the Catalan language. The intensive study of Catalan, geared primarily at reading knowledge, but not limited to it, will be complemented with a cultural overview of Catalonia and the Catalan-speaking lands (Catalunya, País Valencià, Illes Balears, Andorra, Catalunya Nord, and the city of l’Alguer in Sardinia). The case of Catalonia and its unique and exemplary characteristics will be a perfect occasion to undertake more general reflections on the intricate relations between language, culture, politics, and globalization. 

    Note: For Undergraduate Spanish Majors, HISP-C 105 may count as your 300/400 level elective.

    HISP-C 105   #7565 10:10A-11:00A   MWF   WH 104    STAFF

    Note: Above class meets with HISP-C 491 and HISP-X 491.


    HISP-X 491  Individual Readings in Catalan Studies  (1-3 credits)

    Globalization has unified economies, torn down political barriers, and turned local spaces into tourist attractions. In this context, Barcelona, the capital of Catalonia, has become a successful global city that offers a balanced combination of vibrant economic activity and Mediterranean relaxed lifestyle. Its cultural centers, its architectural and artistic heritage, its sunny beaches, and its cool nightlife have also turned Catalonia into one of the world’s most fashionable tourist destinations. The names of some modern Catalan creators are familiar to all: Gaudí, Miró, Dalí, to name just three.

    At the heart of this success lies an enigmatic element: the presence and vitality of the Catalan language. In the last decades, Catalan, spoken by approximately 10 million people, has both maintained a high cultural prestige and increased its public presence remaining a key political tool in Catalonia and the other Catalan-speaking areas.

    This introductory course to Catalan language and culture aims at providing a basic knowledge of the Catalan language. The intensive study of Catalan, geared primarily at reading knowledge, but not limited to it, will be complemented with a cultural overview of Catalonia and the Catalan-speaking lands (Catalunya, País Valencià, Illes Balears, Andorra, Catalunya Nord, and the city of l’Alguer in Sardinia). The case of Catalonia and its unique and exemplary characteristics will be a perfect occasion to undertake more general reflections on the intricate relations between language, culture, politics, and globalization.
      
    Note:
      For Undergraduate Spanish Majors, HISP-X 491 may count as your 300/400 level elective.

    HISP-X 491   #7088  by permission only   10:10A-11:00A  MWF  WH 104   STAFF
    Note: Above class meets with HISP-C 105 and HISP-C 491.

    top

     

    PORTUGUESE

    HISP-P 100  Elementary Portuguese I  (4 credits)

    This course is the first in a two-course sequence at the elementary level of Portuguese. It is an introduction to contemporary Portuguese language and culture and involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that develop grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is on oral communication with grammar and vocabulary taught in context. The cultures of Brazil are presented using interactive activities, songs videos, discussions, and short readings.

    HISP-P 100   #2373    10:10A-11:00A      MTWR    SB 231    STAFF


    HISP-P 135 Intensive Portuguese (4 credits) 

    An accelerated treatment of material covered in both P100 and P150 designed for highly motivated students and students with previous language training on another Romance language. May be used as an elective for the Spanish major. Emphasis on oral communication with grammar and vocabulary taught in context. The cultures of Brazil and the Portuguese-speaking world will be presented using interactive activities, songs videos, discussions, and short readings. Credit given for only one of the two classes: P135 or P150.

    HISP-P 135  #6574    10:10A-11:00A   MTWR    SY 0013   STAFF 

    Note: Above class meets with HISP-P 491.
    Note: To Spanish majors, HISP-P 135 may count as one of the 300/400 level electives for the Spanish major.


    HISP-P 200 Second‑Year Portuguese I (3 credits) 
    Prerequisite:  Successful completion of P150 or P135 

    First in a two-course sequence at the intermediate level of Portuguese, this course reinforces and builds upon the communication skills acquired in first-year Portuguese. It also includes an introduction to brief literary texts. Students will be able to practice more complex grammar structures and improve their speaking, writing, and reading abilities. Class time will be dedicated to communicating in Portuguese with continuing emphasis on oral communication, vocabulary, and grammar taught in context. The cultures of Brazil and the Portuguese-speaking world are presented using interactive activities, discussion, songs, videos, and readings. Students and instructor will be communicating only in Portuguese.         

    HISP-P 200   #2374      9:05A-9:55A      MWF       PY 113     STAFF         


    HISP-X 272  Experiential Learning in Portuguese  (1 credit)
    Prerequisite:  Consent of Director of Portuguese, Concurrent enrollment in another HISP-P course required.  (although exceptions may be made for international settings.)

    Enables undergraduates to make intellectual connections between scholarly pursuits and community involvement.  Students arrange 1 credit hour of service work either on creative projects that benefit a community, or with local or international nonprofit organizations, government agencies, activist groups, or foundations.  S/F grading.  Under the direction of the Department’s Outreach Coordinator, students will write a reflection paper on their experience. Counts for the minor and/or major in Portuguese.  May be repeated for up to 3 credits.​

    HISP-X 272   #13750      Arranged           Arranged   Prof. Estela Vieira


    HISP-P 311 Advanced Grammar and Composition in Portuguese   (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: P200-P250 or authorization from the course supervisor.

    Intensive study and writing practice of more advanced stylistic levels and grammatical structures of the Portuguese language for a variety of purposes and contexts (such as opinions, descriptions, narrations, and hypotheses). Course content includes diverse reading assignments, specialized vocabulary, film, art, culture and current events that offer students an opportunity for in depth and detailed discussion of the course themes. Active participation in course discussions and activities are crucial for success in this class.

    HISP-P 311    #10340     11:15A-12:30P    TR    WH 104  STAFF

    Note:  The above class meets with HISP-P 492.


    HISP-P 400  Literatures of the Portuguese Speaking World I (3credits)

    This course introduces students to Portuguese, Brazilian, and Lusophone-African literature. It is the first of a two part survey covering works written from the medieval period through romanticism in Brazil and Portugal—students are not obliged to take both parts of the survey. The emergence of an African and African-Brazilian literature will also be discussed. Representative literary authors and works serve as the basis for interdisciplinary and cross-cultural commentary of important social, political and historical issues, including imperialism and overseas expansion, nation building, and revolution. The course combines lecture and discussion, and is conducted in Portuguese. Students not taking the course for Portuguese credit can write assignments, exams, and essays in English or Spanish.  
    This course carries CASE A&H credit.

    HISP-P 400    #31508      1:00P-2:15P    TR    LH 328      Prof. Estela Vieira

    Note: Above class meets with HISP-P 498 and HISP-P 500.


    HISP-X 492  Readings in Luso-Brazilian Literature (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  Consent of the Department.

    May be repeated for a maximum of up to 6 credit hours as long as each registration covers a different topic.

    HISP-X 492   #2376      By Permission Only  ARRANGED             ARRANGED   Prof. Estela Vieira


    HISP-P 495  Luso-Brazilian Colloquium   (3 credits)  
    Variable Title: Thinking in Portuguese: Essay, Criticism, Theory in the Lusophone Tradition

    Beginning with Ribeiro Sanches and Luís António Verney, two major figures of the Portuguese Enlightenment, this course surveys the writing of some of the most influential thinkers, literary, historians, and cultural critics of the Luso-Brazilian nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including Joaquim Nabuco, Antero de Quental, Gilberto Freyre, Antônio Cândido, Silviano Santiago, Roberto Schwarz, Alfredo Bosi, Jorge de Sena, Edurado Lourenço. Boaventura Sousa Santos, the “três Marias” among others.  Our task will be to study the aesthetic debates and the sociopolitical contexts informing these tests, reflect on how these intellectual and philosophical traditions have shaped Lusophone literary history and culture, as well as to reflect on their form and methods.

    This course carries CASE A & H and GCC2 credit.

    HISP-P 495    #31483   2:30P-3:45P   TR    LH 025   Prof. Estela Vieira
    Note: Above class meets with HISP-P 498 and HISP-P 695.

    HISP-P 695  Luso-Brazilian Colloquium   VT: Thinking in Portuguese:  Essay, Criticism, Theory in the Lusophone Tradition

    Beginning with Ribeiro Sanches and Luís António Verney, two major figures of the Portuguese Enlightenment, this course surveys the writing of some of the most influential thinkers, literary, historians, and cultural critics of the Luso-Brazilian nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including Joaquim Nabuco, Antero de Quental, Gilberto Freyre, Antônio Cândido, Silviano Santiago, Roberto Schwarz, Alfredo Bosi, Jorge de Sena, Edurado Lourenço. Boaventura Sousa Santos, the “três Marias” among others.  Our task will be to study the aesthetic debates and the sociopolitical contexts informing these tests, reflect on how these intellectual and philosophical traditions have shaped Lusophone literary history and culture, as well as to reflect on their form and methods.


    HISP-P 498  Portuguese Honors Seminar  (3 credits)
    Variable Title: 
    Literatures of the Portuguese Speaking World I

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Portuguese. This HISP-P 498, #31510 meets with HISP-P 400 #31508.  If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-P 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #31510  Permission needed   1:00P-2:15P    TR   LH 328   Prof. Estela Vieira

    Note:  Above class is open to Portuguese Honors Students only.
    Note:  Above class meets with HISP-P 400 & HISP-P 500
    Note:  Above class carries A & H credit.

    The course description for HISP-P 400 is as follows:

    This course introduces students to Portuguese, Brazilian, and Lusophone-African literature. It is the first of a two part survey covering works written from the medieval period through romanticism in Brazil and Portugal—students are not obliged to take both parts of the survey. The emergence of an African and African-Brazilian literature will also be discussed. Representative literary authors and works serve as the basis for interdisciplinary and cross-cultural commentary of important social, political and historical issues, including imperialism and overseas expansion, nation building, and revolution. The course combines lecture and discussion, and is conducted in Portuguese. Students not taking the course for Portuguese credit can write assignments, exams, and essays in English or Spanish.  


    HISP-P 498  Portuguese Honors Seminar  (3 credits)
    Variable Title:  Brazilian Literature and the Media
    Prerequisite:  By permission only. Call (812) 855-8612 or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Portuguese. This HISP-P 498, #12948 meets with HISP-P 495 #31483.  If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-P 498   #12948    2:30P-3:45P    TR   LH 025    Prof. Estela Vieira

    Note:  Above class meets with HISP-P 495 and HISP-P 581.
    Note:  Above class carries CASE A & H and CASE GCC2 credit.

    The HISP-P 495 course description is as follows: 

    In this course, we will focus on the intersection between the literature written in Brazil and the media. Topics include: Mixed-media literature; Fanzine; Media and hypermedia poetry; Experimental literature; Blogs turned into books; Literary gaming; Journalism and literature; Literature and propaganda; Music and literature; Literary adaptations to TV and the big screen; Serial fiction (romance de folhetim); Crônica; Cordel literature (literatura de cordel); Detective novel; Literature and violence;The bestselling phenomenon. We will also read theoretical works that discuss the mediality of literature, the impact of media on literature, and the role of writers and readers in contemporary times, among others. Readings and class discussion in Portuguese. ​


    HISP-P 499  Honors Research in Portuguese  (1–3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-P 498
    By Permission Only:  Call (812) 855-8612 or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu

    Approval of the Director of Portuguese Studies.  For Portuguese students who will be writing their Honors Thesis to graduate with Honors in Portuguese.

    HISP-P 499   #7721   ARRANGED      ARRANGED     Prof. Estela Vieira

    Note: Above class open to Portuguese Honors students only.

    top


    Spanish 100 & 200-LEVELS

    HISP-S 100 Elementary Spanish  (4 credits)  
    By permission only.  Call (812) 855-8612 or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu

    This Spanish course focuses on the four basic language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) at the most basic level, with a particular emphasis on critical thinking skills.  In this course, students learn introductory Spanish phrases and basic vocabulary as well as practice beginning writing skills and upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to discuss everyday topics such as family, academic courses, pastimes, food, likes and dislikes, weather, daily life situations and similar beginner topics.  Courses are conducted in Spanish at a level appropriate for the course.  Grading is based on exams, homework, participation, attendance, and cumulative final exam.  All homework is completed online.  Enrollment in S100 is restricted to those with less than 2 years of high school Spanish or with the consent of the department. All others must enroll in S105. The next course in the sequence for HISP-S 100 students would be HISP-S 150 Elementary Spanish II.

    See schedule of classes at One.IU, Student Center or Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then fall 2018 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S. 


    HISP-S 105  First Year Spanish (4 credits)

    This introductory and intensive course is designed for students with two or more years of high-school Spanish study and covers the essential beginning grammar and vocabulary of our first year Spanish courses, S100 and S150.  Courses are all taught in Spanish at a level appropriate for the course.  Students will practice speaking in small groups in class and will read and discuss a variety of topics in Spanish.  Grading is based on exams, homework, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam.  As this course covers all of the material of HISP-S100 and HISP-S150, the homework load is substantial.  Credit is not given for both HISP-S105 and HISP-S100 or HISP-S105 and HISP-S150.  The next course in the sequence is HISP-S200 Second Year Spanish I.

    See schedule of classes at One.IU, Student Center or Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then fall 2018 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S. 

    HISP-S 105 #10354 Open to Hutton Honors students only.


    HISP-S 150 Elementary Spanish II (4 credits)  
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 100

    This course continues the work of S100 with continued emphasis on all four language skills and on critical thinking skills, all still at an introductory level. Students will practice speaking in small groups in class, as well as reading and discussing materials in Spanish and upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to discuss everyday topics such as family, academic courses, pastimes, food, likes and dislikes, weather, daily life situations and similar beginner topics. Grading is based on exams, homework, compositions, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. The next course in this sequence is HISP-S 200 Second-Year Spanish I. 

    Note: HISP-S 150 is for those students who took HISP-S 100 Elementary Spanish here at IUB or took an equivalent course at a regional campus or other university.

    See schedule of classes at One.IU, Student Center or Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then fall 2018 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S. 


    HISP-S 200 Second‑Year Spanish I    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 105 or HISP-S 150 or equivalent. 

    This course reviews some of the basic structures studied in the first year, and continues into more advanced material.  Upon completion of the course, students will be able to interpret and reflect on a variety of contemporary issues that were introduced in the first-year Spanish courses. Emphasis remains on the four language skills and on critical thinking skills. Courses are conducted in Spanish at a level appropriate for the course.  Writing exercises and short literary and cultural readings are also included. Grades are based on exams, homework, compositions, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Homework load is substantial; all homework is completed online. The next course in this sequence is HISP-S 250 Second-Year Spanish II.

    See schedule of classes at One.IU, Student Center or Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then fall 2018 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S. 

    HISP-S 200  #2406 class is open to Hutton Honors students only.


    HISP-S 250 Second‑Year Spanish II  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 200 or equivalent. 

    The final basic language course continues the work of HISP-S 200 with emphasis on the four skills and on critical thinking skills.  Writing exercises and short literary and cultural readings are included. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to interpret and reflect on a variety of contemporary issues that were introduced in the first-year Spanish courses. Courses are conducted in Spanish at a level appropriate for the course.  Grades are based on exams, homework, compositions, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Homework load is substantial; all homework is done online. After successful completion of this course, the foreign language requirement is fulfilled for schools that require a 4th -semester proficiency. For those students who wish to go on for a minor or major in Spanish, the next course to take would be HISP-S 280 Spanish Grammar in Context.

    See schedule of classes at One.IU, Student Center or Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then fall 2018 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S. 


    HISP-S 250 Second‑Year Spanish II  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 200 or equivalent. 

    This course continues the work of HISP-S 200 with a continued emphasis on the four skills and on critical thinking skills.  Short literary readings are also included. Grades are based on exams and presentations, preparation and homework, compositions, participation, attendance, and a final exam. Preparation and homework load is substantial. After successful completion of this course, the foreign language requirement is fulfilled for schools that require a 4th -semester proficiency. For those students who wish to go on for a minor or major in Spanish, the next course to take would be HISP-S 280 Spanish Grammar in Context.

    HISP-S 250  #2431  Honors   11:15A-12:05P    MWF   WH 109    Virginia Hojas

    Note:  This course will be delivered as a flipped course, as part of the Mosaic Fellowship program at IUB, and will not be using Ancla.​

    Note:  This class open to Hutton Honors Students only.


    HISP-S 269 Spanish for Health Professions    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 250 or equivalent
    This course is designed for intermediate students of Spanish interested in acquiring the historical, social, cultural and linguistic knowledge necessary to recognize and analyze critically the multiple issues involved in intercultural communications in medical settings. The broad goal of this course is to enable students to use the knowledge and analytical skills gained from this course in order to facilitate multicultural communication in medical contexts as well as more generally in today’s society.
    This course carries CASE S & H credit.

    HISP-S 269   #11852       10:10A-11:00A    MWF    LH 025      Sandra Ortiz

    Note:  Those students who tested into HISP-S 280 Spanish Grammar in Context and opt to take HISP-S 269 as their first Spanish course at IUB, may claim special credit for HISP-S 200 and HISP-S 250 if they pass this course with a “C” or better. 
    Note:  For students minoring or majoring in Spanish, S269 does not replace S280 and does not count toward the minor or major in Spanish.


    HISP-S 280  Spanish Grammar in Context (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: S250 or equivalent.

    The overall goal of this course is to provide students with the language skills necessary to pursue upper division course work in Spanish. The main focus is on the development of formal linguistic skills through explicit grammar instruction and review, vocabulary building exercises, reading original texts by contemporary authors, and exploring the link between literature and culture through writing and conversation.

    The main objective of S280 is to strengthen students’ comprehension and application of the most challenging grammatical structures for second language learners within a meaningful language context. This objective will be accomplished with a thorough review and practice of problematic grammatical structures, the analysis of these and other structures in the context provided by a series of literary readings and selections from an audio book, and the application of these structures in writing and discussion sessions. The course will be conducted in Spanish.

    See schedule of classes at One.IU, Student Center or Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then fall 2018 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.

    Note: Class number #6489 is for Hutton Honors Students only.

    Spanish 300-LEVEL

    HISP-S 308 Composition and Conversation in Spanish (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.  Co-requisite: may be taken concurrent with HISP-S 280.

    The objective of this course is to develop students’ oral and writing abilities in Spanish.  Students will develop writing skill in Spanish by learning and practicing the main components of different writing styles: description, narration, exposition, and argumentation.  Students will learn compositional elements that provide cohesion and coherence in both formal and informal writing styles.  Students will develop their oral skills by watching and discussing a number of critically acclaimed films from different Spanish-speaking countries which deal with a variety of cultural, social, and political issues.  To achieve the goal of improving oral proficiency, students will participate in various in-class discussions and debates on controversial topics presented in the films.  By the end of this course, students will be able to write in a variety of formal and informal writing styles and to discuss a wide range of topics.

    See schedule of classes at One.IU, Student Center or Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then fall 2018 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.

    Note: Class number #6859 is for Hutton Honors Students only.


    HISP-S 315  Spanish in the Business World  (3 credits) 
    Prerequisite: S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    The objective of this course is to enhance cross-cultural and linguistic competence in the business world through both the study of the use of Spanish in business and the examination of the codes, costumes, and other particular manifestations of business culture across the Spanish-speaking world.  Students will familiarize themselves with commercial Spanish, both written and oral, in a variety of formats and contexts.  Students will work on reading, writing and translating several types of documents and improve their oral skills though practice related to real life business situations. Students will also acquire knowledge on the customs, protocols, and cultural practices of the business world in Spanish-speaking countries and communities. Through concrete case studies, students will critically engage on a variety of topics which may include cultural stereotyping, cross-cultural business communication, cultural behaviors, and the ethics of international commerce.  This course is entirely conducted in Spanish.

    HISP-S 315   #2443     9:05A-9:55A     MWF      GA 0011       STAFF


    HISP-S 317 Spanish Conversation & Diction (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This class meets five times a week. It includes contrastive study of Spanish and English pronunciation.  Intensive controlled conversation correlated with readings, reports, debates, and group discussions.  S317 may be repeated once for credit.  S317 is NOT open to native speakers of Spanish.

    HISP-S 317   #13175       9:05A-9:55A      MTWRF        BH 321       STAFF


    HISP-S 322  Introduction to Film Analysis in Spanish  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent

    This course aims: (1) to introduce students to terms common to film analysis and film theory in Spanish; (2) to expose students to different film genres from Latin American countries and Spain; (3) provide students with an understanding of select cultural and historical factors that have influenced film production in Latin America and Spain. The first half of the course will be devoted to recognizing and understanding the formal components of film. In the course’s second half, we will examine how cinema can communicate a story and consider theoretical concepts common to film studies (e.g., auteur theory, genre studies, realism, ideology, gender, transnationalism) and how they manifest themselves in Latin American and Spanish cinemas. Generally, the class will watch two movies per week. Students will view the movies by streaming them online and will also have the *option* of attending evening screenings once a week. 

    This course carries CASE A & H credit.

    HISP-S 322    #11411  1:00P-2:15P   TR   LH 023   Professor Jonathan Risner
    Evening Screening Times:   6:30P-9:00P      R       BH 011    Optional


    HISP-S 324 Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Cultures (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This course is an introduction to the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world of the Iberian Peninsula and the Americas.  We discuss a variety of materials, including films, artworks and shorter literary and historical texts. Students learn about the key events and the fundamental ideas and themes running through the cultures of Spain and Latin America across the centuries. Class discussions focus on processes of conquest and colonialism, nation formation, modernization, and on the changing roles of religion, race and gender. Through discussions, written papers and exams, students learn to critically read and understand Hispanic cultures, and to develop original arguments in written and spoken Spanish.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC2 distribution credit.

    HISP-S 324   #6918  HONORS    8:00A-8:50A    MWF   GA  0005    Prof. Edgar Illas

    Note:  Above class open to Hutton Honors Students only.


    HISP-S 324 Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Cultures (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.
    This course offers an introduction to the cultural history of Spain and Latin America. Learning about the historical formation of these regions and their people and how a wide variety of civilizations and cultures have marked their ways of life, cultural production and identities will provide students a necessary background to attain a more complex understanding of what today we generally, and too broadly, call Hispanic cultures.
    This course aims to provide students with the vocabulary and conceptual tools for cultural analysis, improve their oral and written expression in Spanish taking them to the next level, and help them develop better critical thinking skills. The linguistic and analytical tools that students learn in this course will prepare them for more advanced classes in Hispanic literatures and cultures, for study abroad, and for their professional development.
    Through the analysis of both written texts and visual culture (fine arts, photography, film, etc.), the course will look at the Iberian Peninsula from the Roman and Muslim empires to the political construction of Spain as a political unit under the Catholic religion and its imperial expansion across the Atlantic.  We will also learn about the American empires and civilizations (Maya, Aztec, Inca) prior to the arrival of Columbus and the radical social, cultural, ethnic, and political transformation that the Americas suffered after the conquest. We will study the period of Independence and formation of modern but contested nations on both sides of the Atlantic, the rise of US and northern European imperialism and its influence in the South, paying attention to the extraordinarily original and influential cultural manifestations produced in two centuries of political upheavals across Latin America, Spain and the US.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC2 distribution credit.

    HISP-S 324   #8328    9:30A-10:45A    TR   GA 0011   Prof. Alejandro Mejías-López


    HISP-S 324 Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Cultures (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This course offers an introduction to the cultural history of Spain and Latin America, focusing on key moments of cultural conflict, negotiation, and exchange. It traces the formation of cultural practices in Spain and Latin America from the pre-Columbian period through the twenty-first century, and it offers students a comprehensive view of some of the major figures that have shaped Hispanic cultures: including cultural icons, philosophical thinkers, artists, and musicians. Students learn about key events and important ideas and concerns that have shaped Hispanic cultures across the centuries, such as processes of conquest and colonialism, postcolonial nation formation, revolutionary processes, and the changing roles of religion, race, and gender. Through discussions, written compositions and exams, students learn to critically read and understand Hispanic cultures, and to develop original arguments in written and spoken Spanish. The class is entirely conducted in Spanish.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC2 distribution credit.

    HISP-S 324  #12631   11:15A-12:30P  TR   GA 0007  Prof. Olimpia Rosenthal
    HISP-S 324  #6915  2:30P-3:45P    TR   GA 0011   Prof. Olimpia Rosenthal


    HISP-S 324 Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Cultures (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This course offers an introduction to the cultural history of Spain and Latin America. Learning about the historical formation of these regions and their people and how a wide variety of civilizations and cultures have marked their ways of life, cultural production and identities will provide students a necessary background to attain a more complex understanding of what today we generally, and too broadly, call Hispanic cultures.
    This course aims to provide students with the vocabulary and conceptual tools for cultural analysis, improve their oral and written expression in Spanish taking them to the next level, and help them develop better critical thinking skills. The linguistic and analytical tools that students learn in this course will prepare them for more advanced classes in Hispanic literatures and cultures, for study abroad, and for their professional development.
    Through the analysis of both written texts and visual culture (fine arts, photography, film, etc.), the course will look at the Iberian Peninsula from the Roman and Muslim empires to the political construction of Spain as a political unit under the Catholic religion and its imperial expansion across the Atlantic.  We will also learn about the American empires and civilizations (Maya, Aztec, Inca) prior to the arrival of Columbus and the radical social, cultural, ethnic, and political transformation that the Americas suffered after the conquest. We will study the period of Independence and formation of modern but contested nations on both sides of the Atlantic, the rise of US and northern European imperialism and its influence in the South, paying attention to the extraordinarily original and influential cultural manifestations produced in two centuries of political upheavals across Latin America, Spain and the US.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC2 distribution credit.

    HISP-S 324   #6921      9:05A-9:55A      MWF    GA 0009    STAFF
    HISP-S 324   #6920     10:10A-11:00A    MWF    BH 307      STAFF
    HISP-S 324   #6919     10:10A-11:00A    MWF    BH 018     STAFF
    HISP-S 324   #8338     11:15A-12:05P    MWF    WH 104     STAFF
    HISP-S 324   #6916        1:00P-2:15P       TR     AC C118    STAFF
    HISP-S 324   #11631      1:00P-2:15P       TR     BH 011      STAFF
    HISP-S 324   #7833        4:00P-5:15P       TR     AC C118    STAFF


    HISP-S 326  Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent
    This course examines the basic linguistic structure of Spanish based on the principal fields of linguistic studies.  The course begins with an overview of the characteristics of human language.  Course topics include the structure and order of words (syntax), the forms and structure of words (morphology), the sounds of Spanish (phonetics and phonology) and how they compare with English, and how Spanish varies across regions, and by social considerations.
    Class time is primarily lecture based, but also includes linguistic exercises, analysis, and discussion.  Course activities include self-analysis of Spanish abilities and comparison with native speakers (the goal being to improve the student’s language abilities by contrastive analysis of linguistic structure).  Evaluation is based on participation, homework assignments, projects, exams and presentations. 

    This course carries CASE N&M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 326    #9869     10:10A-11:00A    MWF   WH 109    Prof. Erik Willis


    HISP-S 326  Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent

    This course provides an introduction to the field of Hispanic Linguistics and establishes a foundation in the major areas of linguistics. After an introduction to language, the course describes the organization of the sound system of Spanish (phonetics and phonology). This unit includes the presentation of the principles of phonetic transcription as well as important phonological processes. Next, basic concepts in morphology, the internal structure of words, will be examined, including a description of the formation of nouns, adjectives, adverbs, and verbs (morphology). Then, in order to examine how words combine at the sentence level, we will study the basic concepts of sentence structure (syntax) and its connection to meaning (semantics). The course ends with an overview of language use in context (pragmatics) and linguistic variation in the Spanish-speaking world (sociolinguistics).

    This course carries CASE N&M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 326    HONORS    #6577    1:00P-2:15P   TR   GA 0007   Prof. César Félix-Brasdefer

    Note:  Above class is for Hutton Honors Students only.


    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics  (3 credits)   
    Prerequisites:  S280 or S310 or equivalent

    Introduces the basic concepts of Hispanic linguistics and establishes the background for the future application of linguistic principles.  The course surveys linguistic properties in Spanish, including phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax.  Additional introductory material on sociolinguistics, pragmatics, second language acquisition, and historical linguistics will be included.   

    This class carries CASE N & M credit.

    HISP-S 326  #8023           9:30A-10:45A      TR       LH 125     STAFF


    HISP-S 326  #5260         11:15A-12:30P       TR      WH 109    STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #9805        11:15A-12:30P       TR       BQ C232  STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #2444         12:20P-1:10P       MWF     GA 0005   STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #13052         1:25P-2:15P       MWF     GA 0005   STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #7584           2:30P-3:45P        TR       WI C109   STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #31574         2:30P-3:45P        MW      RA B111  STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #4629           4:00P-5:15P         TR       GA 0011   STAFF

    HISP-S 328 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent

    This course offers an introduction to the critical reading of Hispanic literature through the analysis of selected literary texts from Spain and Spanish America. One of the key aspects that you will take away from the course is an appreciation of different genres as well as a reflection on the concept of genre itself. The following three genres will be covered: narrative fiction (short story and novel), poetry, and theater. The course will also highlight the importance of socio-historical context to literary works. Learning outcomes: in the analyses of the selected texts from the three literary genres (in class, as homework, as compositions), the course will introduce you to basic narratological, poetic, dramaturgical, and rhetorical terms and concepts used in the study of literature. You will also learn how to discuss these terms and concepts analytically in oral and written Spanish as you gain knowledge of literary trends over time and from both sides of the Atlantic. Evaluation will be based on written homework, three short essays, exams and active participation.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC2 distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328    #6659     10:10A-11:00A    MWF    BH 206   Prof. Reyes Vila-Belda


    HISP-S 328 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent

    This course provides an introduction to the analysis of Hispanic literary texts and film through the study of work by some the most important writers/filmmakers in 20th – 21st century Hispanic culture.  In particular, it focuses on critical reading and literary analysis as a way of gaining a more complex understanding of literature and other cultural forms (e.g. music, film, television, etc.).  During the semester, we will learn how to read critically and creatively, analyzing the strategies that different authors use to express their ideas, create their literary and filmic worlds, and engage and persuade the reader.  As an introduction to literature, the class will familiarize you with the basic tools for the analysis of film and three literary genres:  narrative, poetry, and drama.  We will question the limits of textual interpretation (What is the difference between opinion and interpretation?  Is any interpretation of a text valid?) and work towards producing readings that are creative, insightful and grounded.  The course will also focus, therefore, on building your textual interpretation through active class discussion and argumentative writing in Spanish.
    The analytical tools that you learn in this course will help you to better debate and discuss your ideas in Spanish, will empower you to be more critical and creative thinkers across the board (whatever your major), will help you hone your reading and writing skills, and will prepare you for more advanced classes in literature and cultural studies should you take them.
    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC2 distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328   #6499  HONORS  11:15A-12:05P   MWF  GA 0005  Prof. Melissa Dinverno

    Note: Above class open to Hutton Honors Students only.


    HISP-S 328 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This course provides students with an introduction to the study of Hispanic literatures through time. Through
    in-class discussions and written work, students will acquire conceptual tools in Spanish and learn to develop grounded interpretations of texts by analyzing their content (story, ideas, themes), the ways through which content is structured and expressed by the way texts are written, and the relationship between a text and its historical, cultural, social, and/or political context. The course’s approach stems from the proposition that by better understanding the way texts creates meaning and engage with the ideas, changes, and preoccupations of their time, we will also be able to become better, more sophisticated readers in Spanish (and beyond). The analytical tools that students learn in this course will also prepare them for more advanced classes in literature and culture

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC2 distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328   #6497     11:15A-12:30P      TR     LH 125    Prof. Ryan Giles
    HISP-S 328   #8481      1:00P-2:15P        TR     LH 135    Prof. Ryan Giles


    HISP-S 328 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This course provides students with an introduction to the study of Hispanic literatures. Students will improve their knowledge of Hispanic cultures and their skills in Spanish through the reading of different literary genres, in-class discussions, and written work. This course provides students the tools and vocabulary to think and express themselves critically in Spanish and to develop their own interpretations of texts based on their content (story, ideas, and themes), form (how they are structured and written) and context (cultural, historical, social, and/or political).  The linguistic, cultural, and analytical tools that students learn in this course prepare them for more advanced classes in Spanish. 

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC2 distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328   #6495           9:30A-10:45A       TR       LH 101       STAFF
    HISP-S 328   #8482           9:30A-10:45A       TR       LH 135       STAFF
    HISP-S 328   #6496          12:20P-1:10P       MWF     BH 005       STAFF
    HISP-S 328   #6498            2:30P-3:20P       MWF     GA 0005     STAFF
    HISP-S 328   #13832          2:30P-3:45P         TR      BQ C232     STAFF


    HISP-S 334 Panoramas of Hispanic Literature  (3 credits)    
    Prerequisite:  S328 or equivalent.   
           
    This panoramic course offers students an introduction to a wide variety of Latin American literatures written in Spanish. We will survey texts and historical contexts from the Spanish conquest through colonialism, independence, and the 20th century.  Through the analysis of poetry, theatre, and many types of narrative students will develop further proficiency in written and spoken Spanish as well as skill in analyzing cultural texts.  This course provides a solid foundation for understanding and interpreting the interaction between literature and broader cultural movements in Latin America.   

    This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    HISP-S 334    #6909     9:30A-10:45A   TR    GA 0007    Prof. Kathleen Myers


    HISP-X 370  Experiential Learning in Spanish  (1 credit)
    Prerequisite:  Consent of the Department, Call (812) 855-8612

    This course enables undergraduates to make intellectual connections between scholarly pursuits and community involvement. Students arrange 1 credit hour of service work on a creative project that benefits a community, or with local or international nonprofit organizations, government agencies, activist groups, or foundations. Requires a reflection paper on the experience.

    HISP-X 370  #13751   ARRANGED   ARRANGED   Prof. Alejandro Mejías-López

    Note: This course may count toward the Spanish major and minor.
    Note: This course may be repeated up to 3 credit hours as long as the topic is different.

    top

    Spanish 400-LEVEL

    HISP-S 408   Survey of Spanish Literature 2  New Title: Iberian Modernities (3 credits) LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328 or equivalent

    The purpose of this course is to study the struggle of progressive writers and their attempts towards the modernization of Spain, from the 18th century to the present. We will examine a selection of outstanding literary texts by authors who resisted traditional conventions and established structures of power. With their writings, they contributed to the advancement of modernity. The selected authors are affiliated with different movements ranging from Enlightenment, through Romanticism and Realism, to the fin de siglo, las Vanguardias, the Spanish Civil War, the Franco dictatorship, and to democratic Spain exploring their connection with the historical context. We will analyze changes relating to social and gender practices and institutions during those centuries. We will also pay special attention to evolution in both style and content encoded in the texts tracing the path towards Modernity. Authors include Cadalso, Bécquer, Rosalía de Castro, Pardo Bazán, Machado, García Lorca, Martín Gaite, Riera, and others. This is a discussion course based on daily reading assignments. Class attendance and participation are essential. There will be several short essays, exams and a paper. The course is taught entirely in Spanish.   The class carries CASE A & H credit.

    HISP-S 408  #31660   11:15A-12:05P  MWF   BH 206   Prof. Reyes Vila-Belda

    Note:  Above class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #31667.


    HISP-S411  SPAIN:  The Cultural Context (3credits)       CULTURE
    Prerequisite:  S324, or a 300-level Literature class

    This course focuses on the insertion of Spain into the new global order by examining the links between culture, politics and the economy in the contemporary period, beginning with the Civil War (1936-1939) but focusing especially on the post-Francoist years (1975 to present). We will examine literary works, movies, and essays in their relation to the constraints imposed by Franco’s dictatorship and to the subsequent process of democratization. We will also analyze this political process in relation to the economic re-structuring of Spain during the second half of the century in its three main modes: as a key destination for global tourists, as a site for investments of multinational companies, and as a destination for many non-European immigrants searching for better work conditions. Finally, we will also study the central and unresolved conflict of the contemporary period: the question of the secession of Catalonia. The goal of the course is to explore the various forms in which culture is embedded in these historical changes.

    Note: This course carries the CASE A & H and GCC2 distribution credit.

    HISP-S 411   #31634     9:05A-9:55A    MWF      GA 0005   Prof. Edgar Illas

    Note:  Above class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #31637.


    HISP-S 413  Hispanic Culture in the U.S. (3credits)              CULTURE
    Prerequisite:  S324,or a 300-level literature course

    This course explores Latina/o culture in the United States from the 19th century until today. Through the close study of essays, novels, short stories, poems, plays, comics, film, advertising, and music we will analyze a diverse body of Latina/o cultural production in relation to various socio-historical contexts. Among the topics we will cover are the representations of legendary resistance figures after the Mexican-American War, farm work and rural life, family and coming of age, language and identity, racial, ethnic, and political conflict, the creation and commodification of Latina/o identity, Latina/o popular culture, gender/sexuality, and immigration. In addition, students will further develop the concepts and skills necessary to analyze the particular ways in which different cultural texts produce meaning. 

    This course is taught in Spanish and carries CASE A & H and DUS credit.

    HISP-S 413  #13180  8:00A-9:15A   TR  GA 0005   Prof. R. Andrés Guzmán

    Note:  Above class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #13406.


    HISP-S 420  Modern Spanish-American Prose Fiction  (3 credits) LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328 or equivalent

    In this course, we will study the trajectory of Spanish American and Caribbean prose fiction from the modernista movement of the late 1800s-early 1900s through the present.  Themes that we will emphasize include:  questions of empire, independence, revolution, and industrialization; the ability to effect social and political change (or not); literary strategies of representation and their goals; and efforts to construct collective identities (national, regional, gender/sexuality, racial, class). We will pay close attention to texts’ problematizations of reality and representations of time (and the implications thereof), to the challenges that texts pose to traditional gender roles, and to how gender and sexuality may be reflected and refracted through political movements.  We will examine the ways that content and structure/techniques work together in literary texts to convey themes, and we will explore how texts engage with—reflect, respond to, and, often, seek to change—their historical, cultural, social, and/or political contexts.  
    Primary readings may include novels and short stories by Bombal, Borges, Carpentier, Castellanos, García Márquez, Obejas, Vargas Llosa, Vega, and others.
    Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, homework, exams, and essays.

    This course carries CASE A & H credit.

    HISP-S 420    #31688    9:30A-10:45A    TR   GA 0013    Prof. Deborah Cohn

    Note: Above class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #31690.


    HISP-S 425 Spanish Phonetics  (3 credits)                  LINGUISTICS
    Prerequisite: S326 or equivalent                    

    This course studies the sound system of Spanish.  Topics include the articulatory system, the characteristics and description of Spanish sounds, the patterns of Spanish sounds, the historical development of modern Spanish from Latin and the variation of the Spanish sound system. Attention will also be given to differences between Spanish and English sounds.  A secondary goal of the course is a more native-like pronunciation as a result of a deeper understanding of how the Spanish sound system works.  Class activities also include voice recordings, self-analysis, oral and auditory practice, and acoustic analysis of native speaker speech. Course evaluation is based on homework assignments, a class project and presentation, and two exams.                                                                            

    This class carries CASE N&M distribution credit.    

    HISP-S 425    #9224       12:20P-1:10P   MWF   BH 308     Prof. Erik Willis   

    Note: This class meets with HISP-S 498, Reading for Honors, #9225.


    HISP-S 427  The Structure of Spanish     (3 credits)      LINGUISTICS
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent

    ****  Course meets 1st 8 Weeks Sesssion,  Term:  August 20, 2018 through October 12, 2018 ****

    In this course we study the grammatical structure of Spanish, with a focus on the structure of words (morphology) and the rule-based combination of words to form sentences (syntax). After studying the fundamental concepts of morphology with regard to the properties of lexical categories (e.g. noun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition), we analyze the ways in which words combine to form syntactic categories at the phrase level (noun phrase, verb phrase, adjectival phrase, adverbial phrase, prepositional phrase), and then at the sentence level. We analyze the syntactic and semantic properties of both simple and complex sentences. Some of the topics discussed in the course include: argument structure, word order, negation, tense and aspect, and information structure.
    Student evaluation is based on class participation, weekly homework assignments, midterm and final exam, and several small research projects in which students will explore topics in morpho-syntactic variation within the Spanish speaking world.
    This class carries CASE N & M distribution credit

    HISP-S 427   #34447      4:00P-5:15P    MTWR      GA 0007       Prof. Patricia Matos Amaral

    Note: This class meets with HISP-S 498, Readings for Honors, #34448.
    Note: Course meets 1st 8 Weeks Session.


    HISP-S 429  Spanish Sociolinguistics and Pragmatics  (3 credits)    LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title:  Sociolinguistics in Variation of the Spanish Speaking World
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent

    This undergraduate course provides an introduction to the basic concepts in sociolinguistics. Sociolinguistics focuses on the symbolic value of language as an expression of group identity based on region, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, age, or other ways of defining group affiliation. Notions such as speech community, sociolinguistic variable, phonological and syntactic variation, and field methods, will be included. The course also surveys other related topics such as language contact, bilingualism and Spanish in the U.S., Spanish as a heritage language, language attitudes and language identity particularly in the U.S., language and law, language and age, and language and gender.  The course also offers an introduction to the sociolinguistic study of Spanish pragmatics. We will focus on research examining the use of Spanish in Latin America and Spain as well as in the U.S.

    This class carries CASE N & M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 429  #7964    11:15A-12:30P   TR   GA 0009  Prof. Manuel Díaz-Campos

    Note: This class meets with HISP-S 498, Readings for Honors, #31691.


    HISP-S 430  The Acquisition of Spanish (3 credits)             LINGUISTICS
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent    

    This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of the acquisition of Spanish. Concepts such as interlanguage, error analysis, stages of development, language transfer and language universals will be explored. The course will also trace development from Behaviorist theories to more current approaches such as Cognitivist, Functionalist and USAGE-BASED approaches to learner language. The focus of the class will be on learners of Spanish and all application activities will include examples of second language Spanish. Time will be dedicated to the analysis of structures that present challenges to learners from all levels of grammar. Class time will be divided in lectures, discussion, and practical hands-on activities designed to apply theoretical knowledge to practice. Students will be evaluated based on participation, in-class and homework activities, examinations, and a final project.

    This class carries CASE N & M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 430  #8488    1:00P-2:15P   TR     LH 125    Prof. Kimberly Geeslin

    Note: This class meets with HISP-S 498, Readings for Honors, #13232.


    HISP-S 470  Women & Hispanic Literature NEW TITLE: Gender in Hispanic Texts  LITERATURE
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 328 or equivalent.

    Women, Gender, and Literature

    This course explores the representation of gender in literature written by 19th- and 20th- century Hispanic women and the way these writers used literature to question hegemonic notions of gender.  We will focus on both the depiction of their position in their societies, as well as the diverse issues they engage in their created worlds.  Grounding our readings in their historical and cultural contexts, we will discuss the questions these women define as important, the forms and genres in which they choose to write, the attitudes within society and artistic circles regarding gender and sexuality, the possible literary/artistic outlets available to these women, and their own agency in the creation of these outlets.  Special attention will be paid to concepts of performance, voice, desire and sexuality, exile (gendered, racial, geo-political), memory and rewriting the past, and generational relationships between women.

    This course, then, examines a wide range of texts by Hispanic women (Mexican, Cuban, Spanish, Chilean, Chicana) and the way these writers use literature to deal with social issues, while equipping you with the ability to create readings informed by interesting perspectives on gender and women’s writing.

    This course carries CASE A & H credit.

    HISP-S 470  #31705  10:10A-11:00A   MWF  GA 0005  Prof. Melissa Dinverno

    Note: This class meets with HISP-S 498, Readings for Honors, #31706. 


    HISP-S 481  Hispanic American National/Regional Literature  (3 credits)   LITERATURE
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 328 or equivalent.

    Postrevolutionary Cuba

    This course explores the transformational changes that Cuban society has experienced over the last sixty years, from the Cuban Revolution to the economic crisis of the 1990s, to Raúlismo and beyond. It does this through the analysis of literature, film, and visual arts from and about Cuba, produced inside and outside of the island. In the second part of the class we will look at the impact that these changes have had outside of Cuba, for the growing Cuban diaspora community and other Latin American nations, the U.S., the Soviet Union, and in Africa. Cuba’s extraordinary and late opening, from the 1990s on, to western capitalist markets, serves as a backdrop in this class for considering the relation between political and literary/artistic revolutions, memory and censorship, nationalism and cosmopolitanism. Assignments: 2 short essays, discussion leading, one final research project. Class taught in Spanish.

    Texts by Alejo Carpentier, Heberto Padilla, José Lezama Lima, José Manuel Prieto, Pedro Juan Gutiérrez, Akhmel Echeverría, Rafael Rojas, Iván de la Nuez, Cristina García. Art by Wilfredo Lam, Enrique Rottenberg, Koirac, Coco Fusco. Films by Miguel Coyula, Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, among others.

    This course carries CASE A & H and CASE GCC2 credit.

    HISP-S 481    #31709   2:30P-3:45P   TR    GA 0007  Prof. Anke Birkenmaier

    Note: This class meets with HISP-S 498, Readings for Honors, #31713.


    HISP-X 490    Individual Readings in Hispanic Studies  (1-3 credits)  (Was HISP-S 490)
    Prerequisite:  Consent of the department.  Permission required, call (812) 855-8612.

    This course is by authorization only.  This course is used only in emergencies pertaining to graduating seniors who are short credit hours for graduation.  This course may be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.  It may not be used as one of the course requirements for the major or minor.

    HISP-X 490      #2445    By Permission Only      Arranged       Prof. Alejandro Mejías-López


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                       LITERATURE
    Variable Title: Survey of Spanish Literature 2  -  New title: Iberian Modernities
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 328 or equivalent

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #31667 meets with HISP-S 408 #31660.  If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #31667  By Permission   11:15A-12:05P  MWF  BH 206   Prof. Reyes Vila-Belda

    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in GA 2169 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu
    Note: This course carries CASE A & H credit.

    The following description is for HISP-S 408 Survey of Spanish Literatuare 2  New Title: Iberian Modernities

    The purpose of this course is to study the struggle of progressive writers and their attempts towards the modernization of Spain, from the 18th century to the present. We will examine a selection of outstanding literary texts by authors who resisted traditional conventions and established structures of power. With their writings, they contributed to the advancement of modernity. The selected authors are affiliated with different movements ranging from Enlightenment, through Romanticism and Realism, to the fin de siglo, las Vanguardias, the Spanish Civil War, the Franco dictatorship, and to democratic Spain exploring their connection with the historical context. We will analyze changes relating to social and gender practices and institutions during those centuries. We will also pay special attention to evolution in both style and content encoded in the texts tracing the path towards Modernity. Authors include Cadalso, Bécquer, Rosalía de Castro, Pardo Bazán, Machado, García Lorca, Martín Gaite, Riera, and others. This is a discussion course based on daily reading assignments. Class attendance and participation are essential. There will be several short essays, exams and a paper.
    The course is taught entirely in Spanish.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                        CULTURE
    Variable Title: Hispanic Culture in the US
    Prerequisite: Complete one course from S324, S328, S331, S333 or S334

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #13406 meets with HISP-S 413 #13180.  If you are leaning toward culture for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498   #13406  By Permission   8:00A-9:15A   TR   GA 0005   Prof. R. Andrés Guzmán
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in GA 2169 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note:  This course carries the CASE A & H and DUS distribution credit.

    The following description is for HISP-S 413 Hispanic Culture in the US:
    This course explores Latina/o culture in the United States from the 19th century until today. Through the close study of essays, novels, short stories, poems, plays, comics, film, advertising, and music we will analyze a diverse body of Latina/o cultural production in relation to various socio-historical contexts. Among the topics we will cover are the representations of legendary resistance figures after the Mexican-American War, farm work and rural life, family and coming of age, language and identity, racial, ethnic, and political conflict, the creation and commodification of Latina/o identity, Latina/o popular culture, gender/sexuality, and immigration. In addition, students will further develop the concepts and skills necessary to analyze the particular ways in which different cultural texts produce meaning. 


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                     LITERATURE
    Variable Title: Modern Spanish-American Prose Fiction
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328 or equivalent.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #31690 meets with HISP-S 420 #31688.  If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #31690 By Permission    9:30P-10:45P    TR   GA 0013   Prof. Deborah Cohn
    Note: Contact Karla Allgood in GA 2169 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note: Above class carries CASE A & H credit.

    The following description is for HISP-S 420 Modern Spanish-American Prose Fiction:

    In this course, we will study the trajectory of Spanish American and Caribbean prose fiction from the modernista movement of the late 1800s-early 1900s through the present.  Themes that we will emphasize include:  questions of empire, independence, revolution, and industrialization; the ability to effect social and political change (or not); literary strategies of representation and their goals; and efforts to construct collective identities (national, regional, gender/sexuality, racial, class). We will pay close attention to texts’ problematizations of reality and representations of time (and the implications thereof), to the challenges that texts pose to traditional gender roles, and to how gender and sexuality may be reflected and refracted through political movements.  We will examine the ways that content and structure/techniques work together in literary texts to convey themes, and we will explore how texts engage with—reflect, respond to, and, often, seek to change—their historical, cultural, social, and/or political contexts.

    Primary readings may include novels and short stories by Bombal, Borges, Carpentier, Castellanos, García Márquez, Obejas, Vargas Llosa, Vega, and others.

    Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, homework, exams, and essays.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                  LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title: Spanish Phonetics
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #9225 meets with HISP-S 425 #9224.  If you are leaning toward Linguistics for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #9225   By Permission    12:20P-1:10P   MWF   BH 308   Prof. Erik Willis                             
    Note: Contact Karla Allgood in GA 2169 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu

    Note: This course carries CASE N & M distribution credit.

    The Following description is for HISP-S 425 Spanish Phonetics: 

    This course studies the sound system of Spanish.  Topics include the articulatory system, the characteristics and description of Spanish sounds, the patterns of Spanish sounds, the historical development of modern Spanish from Latin and the variation of the Spanish sound system. Attention will also be given to differences between Spanish and English sounds.  A secondary goal of the course is a more native-like pronunciation as a result of a deeper understanding of how the Spanish sound system works.  Class activities also include voice recordings, self-analysis, oral and auditory practice, and acoustic analysis of native speaker speech. Course evaluation is based on homework assignments, a class project and presentation, and two exams.                                     


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)               LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title: The Structure of Spanish
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent.

    *** Course meets 1st 8 weeks session, August 20, 2018 through October 12, 2018 ***

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish. This HISP-S 498, #34448 meets with HISP-S 427 #34447.  If you are leaning toward Linguistics for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498   #34448   By Permission     4:00P-5:15P    MTWR    GA 0007    Prof. Patricia Matos Amaral

    Note: Contact Karla Allgood in GA 2169 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note: This class carries CASE N&M distribution credit.
    Note: Course meets 1st 8 weeks session.

    Description for HISP-S 427 The Structure of Spanish follows:
    In this course we study the grammatical structure of Spanish, with a focus on the structure of words (morphology) and the rule-based combination of words to form sentences (syntax). After studying the fundamental concepts of morphology with regard to the properties of lexical categories (e.g. noun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition), we analyze the ways in which words combine to form syntactic categories at the phrase level (noun phrase, verb phrase, adjectival phrase, adverbial phrase, prepositional phrase), and then at the sentence level. We analyze the syntactic and semantic properties of both simple and complex sentences. Some of the topics discussed in the course include: argument structure, word order, negation, tense and aspect, and information structure.
    Student evaluation is based on class participation, weekly homework assignments, midterm and final exam, and several small research projects in which students will explore topics in morpho-syntactic variation within the Spanish speaking world.


    HISP-S 498  Readings for Honors (3 credits)                  LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title: Sociolinguistics in Variation of the Spanish Speaking World
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #31691 meets with HISP-S 429 #7964.  If you are leaning toward Linguistics for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #31691  By Permission    11:15A-12:30P    TR  GA 0009  Prof. Manuel Díaz-Campos

    Note: Contact Karla Allgood in GA 2169 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu
    Note: This class carries CASE N & M distribution credit.

    Description for HISP-S 429 Sociolinguitics in Variation of the Spanish Speaking World:

    This undergraduate course provides an introduction to the basic concepts in sociolinguistics. Sociolinguistics focuses on the symbolic value of language as an expression of group identity based on region, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, age, or other ways of defining group affiliation. Notions such as speech community, sociolinguistic variable, phonological and syntactic variation, and field methods, will be included. The course also surveys other related topics such as language contact, bilingualism and Spanish in the U.S., Spanish as a heritage language, language attitudes and language identity particularly in the U.S., language and law, language and age, and language and gender.  The course also offers an introduction to the sociolinguistic study of Spanish pragmatics. We will focus on research examining the use of Spanish in Latin America and Spain as well as in the U.S.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)               LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title: The Acquisition of Spanish
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #13232 meets with HISP-S 430 #8488.  If you are leaning toward Linguistics for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498   #13232  By Permission   1:00P-2:15P    TR    LH 125     Prof. Kimberly Geeslin

    Note: Contact Karla Allgood in GA 2169 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu
    Note: This class carries CASE N & M distribution credit.

    Description for HISP-S 430 The Acquisition of Spanish:
    This course provides a foundation in the field of second language acquisition with a specific focus on Spanish. After a brief introduction to central theories and questions motivating research on second language acquisition (SLA), we will explore in detail cognitive and social aspects of SLA, and how SLA differs from learning a first language. Concepts including language transfer, interlanguage, developmental patterns, learner individual differences, and the learning environment will be discussed. Students will examine what is currently known about the acquisition of Spanish phonology, lexis, morphology, syntax, and pragmatics, among other areas, and employ data practices commonly used in the field. Class time will include lecture, student-led discussion and practical application of concepts. Evaluation will be based on: daily student participation/preparation, including leading one discussion and application; unit tasks and quizzes; and an original research project.                                 


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                     LITERATURE
    Variable Title: Women & Hispanic Literature – New Title: Gender in Hispanic Texts
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 328 or equivalent

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #31706 meets with HISP-S 470 #31705.  If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #31706  By Permission   10:10A-11:00A   MWF  GA 0005  Prof. Melissa Dinverno

    Note: Contact Karla Allgood in GA 2169 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note: This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit

    Description for HISP-S 470  Women & Hispanic Literature – New Title: Gender in Hispanic Texts
     
    Women, Gender, and Literature

    This course explores the representation of gender in literature written by 19th- and 20th- century Hispanic women and the way these writers used literature to question hegemonic notions of gender.  We will focus on both the depiction of their position in their societies, as well as the diverse issues they engage in their created worlds.  Grounding our readings in their historical and cultural contexts, we will discuss the questions these women define as important, the forms and genres in which they choose to write, the attitudes within society and artistic circles regarding gender and sexuality, the possible literary/artistic outlets available to these women, and their own agency in the creation of these outlets.  Special attention will be paid to concepts of performance, voice, desire and sexuality, exile (gendered, racial, geo-political), memory and rewriting the past, and generational relationships between women.

    This course, then, examines a wide range of texts by Hispanic women (Mexican, Cuban, Spanish, Chilean, Chicana) and the way these writers use literature to deal with social issues, while equipping you with the ability to create readings informed by interesting perspectives on gender and women’s writing.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                      LITERATURE
    Variable Title: Hispanic American National/Regional Literature
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 328 or equivalent

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #31713 meets with HISP-S 481 #31709.  If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #31713  By Permission   2:30P-3:45P    TR  GA 0007  Prof. Anke Birkenmaier

    Note: Contact Karla Allgood in GA 2169 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note: This course carries CASE A & H and GCC2 distribution credit

    Description for HISP-S 481 Hispanic American National/Regional Literature:

    Postrevolutionary Cuba

    This course explores the transformational changes that Cuban society has experienced over the last sixty years, from the Cuban Revolution to the economic crisis of the 1990s, to Raúlismo and beyond. It does this through the analysis of literature, film, and visual arts from and about Cuba, produced inside and outside of the island. In the second part of the class we will look at the impact that these changes have had outside of Cuba, for the growing Cuban diaspora community and other Latin American nations, the U.S., the Soviet Union, and in Africa. Cuba’s extraordinary and late opening, from the 1990s on, to western capitalist markets, serves as a backdrop in this class for considering the relation between political and literary/artistic revolutions, memory and censorship, nationalism and cosmopolitanism. Assignments: 2 short essays, discussion leading, one final research project. Class taught in Spanish.Texts by Alejo Carpentier, Heberto Padilla, José Lezama Lima, José Manuel Prieto, Pedro Juan Gutiérrez, Akhmel Echeverría, Rafael Rojas, Iván de la Nuez, Cristina García. Art by Wilfredo Lam, Enrique Rottenberg, Koirac, Coco Fusco. Films by Miguel Coyula, Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, among others.


    HISP-S 499 Honors Research in Spanish  ( 1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  Approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.   
    BY PERMISSION ONLY.  Call (812) 855-8612

    Majors doing honors in Spanish would register for this class after they have completed S498 and while they are writing their honors thesis. Contact Karla Allgood via email at kallgood@indiana.edu or see in person in GA 2169 for permission arrangements.

    HISP-S 499  #2446    By Permission Only    Arranged          Professor Alejandro Mejías-López

    top