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Undergraduate Studies

Undergraduate Course Descriptions: Spring 2007

Spanish Language
Portuguese
Literatures in Spanish
Hispanic Linguistics
Hispanic Culture
Individual Readings
Honors Research

Spanish Language

HISP-S 100 Elementary Spanish I (4 credits)

BY PERMISSION ONLY
e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu and list your two top, section preferences.

A four-skills approach to Spanish with an emphasis on critical thinking skills. Grading is based on exams and oral tests, homework, compositions, and a cumulative final exam. Students can expect to practice speaking in small groups in class, and read about and discuss materials in Spanish. Enrollment in S100 is restricted to those with less than 2 years of high school Spanish or with consent of the department. All others must enroll in HISP-S 105. Next course in the sequence for HISP-S 100 students would be HISP-S 150.

HISP-S 100 10725 PERM 10:10A-11:00A MTWR SY 137 STAFF
HISP-S 100 10726 PERM 11:15A-12:05P MTWR SY 106 STAFF
HISP-S 100 10727 PERM 2:30P-3:20P MTWR BH 232 STAFF

Note: A student wishing to enroll in HISP-S 100 must e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu and list two class numbers (sections) that are their top preferences. Since the Onestart system only does permissions by section specific detail, we will only enter two permissions per student.


HISP-S105 First Year Spanish (4 credits)

For students with 2 or more years of high school study. This introductory course covers the essential grammar and vocabulary of first year Spanish. Students can expect to practice speaking in small groups in class, and read about and discuss materials in Spanish. Grading is based on exams, homework, and a cumulative final. Homework load is substantial. Credit not given for HISP-S 105 and HISP-S 100 or HISP-S 150. Next course in sequence is HISP-S 200. See Schedule of Classes on Onestart for class numbers, times, days, and rooms.


HISP-S150 Elementary Spanish II (4 credits)

Prerequisite: HISP-S 100

This course continues the work of S100 with continued emphasis on all four skills and on critical thinking skills. Grading is based on exams and oral tests, homework, compositions, and a cumulative final exam. Students can expect to practice speaking in small groups in class, and read about and discuss materials in Spanish. Next course in the sequence is HISP-S 200. See Schedule of Classes on Onestart for class numbers, times, days, and rooms.

Note: If you tested into HISP-S 105, First Year Spanish that is the course you should register in, NOT HISP-S150!


HISP-S200 Second-Year Spanish I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: HISP-S 105 or HISP-S 150 or equivalent.

This course reviews some of the basic structures studied in the first year, and examines them in more detail. Emphasis remains on the four skills and on critical thinking skills. Literary readings are also included. Grades are based on exams, oral tests, homework, compositions, and a cumulative final exam. Homework load is substantial. The next course in this sequence is HISP-S 250. See Schedule of Classes on Onestart for class numbers, times, days, and rooms.


HISP-S250 Second-Year Spanish II (3 credits)

Prerequisite: HISP-S 200 or equivalent.

This course continues the work of HISP-S 200 with continued emphasis on all four skills and on critical thinking skills. Literary readings are also included. Grades are based on exams, oral tests, homework, compositions, and a cumulative final exam. Homework load is substantial. After successful completion of this course, the foreign language requirement is fulfilled for schools that require a 4 th semester proficiency. See Schedule of Classes on Onestart for class numbers, times, days, and rooms.

Note: HISP-S 250, #10793, 11:15A-12:05P MWF is by permission only. This class is for Honors students only. Honors students who wish to register for this class should call the Hutton Honors College for permission.

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Portuguese

HISP-P135 Intensive Portuguese (4 credits)

For students from secondary school placed into the second semester of first‑year study or those with a strong background in Spanish or another Romance Language. Content of P100 and P150 are covered at an accelerated pace. Credit not given for both P135 and P150.

HISP-P 135 #10714 9:05A-9:55A MTWR BH 232 STAFF


HISP-P 150 Elementary Portuguese II (4 credits)

Prerequisite: P100 or equivalent

Introduction to present‑day Portuguese, with an interactive, communicative focus and structured drills for mastery of phonology, basic structural patterns, and functional vocabulary. To be taken in sequence after P100, Elementary Portuguese I. Attendance in language laboratory may be required.

HISP-P 150 #10715 10:10A-11:00A MTWR BH 238 STAFF


HISP-P 250 Second-Year Portuguese II (3 credits)

Prerequisite: P200 or equivalent.

Second semester of second‑year Portuguese, with increased emphasis on communicative exercises and selected readings. Attendance in the language laboratory may be required.

HISP-P 250 #10716 12:20P-1:10P MWF BH 011 STAFF


HISP-P 311 Advanced Grammar and Composition in Portuguese (3 credits)

Prerequisite: P200-P250 or equivalent.

An advanced course on Portuguese composition and grammar, designed to refine students' knowledge of several language skills. Emphasis on writing, with special attention to syntax and vocabulary development and usage. Students will write compositions, increasing in length and complexity as the semester progresses.

HISP-P 311 #10717 11:15A-12:05P MWF BH 229 STAFF

 Note: This course meets jointly with HISP-P 492.


HISP-P 401 Literatures of the Portuguese Speaking World II (3credits)

The second semester of a two-semester survey on the literatures of the Portuguese-speaking world. In this course, we will examine the concept of “Realism”--its adoption, transformation, and rejection--by late nineteenth and twentieth-century Lusophone authors. We will read prose, poetry, and essays from Lusophone Africa, Brazil and Portugal. Authors include Aluísio Azevedo, Machado de Assis, Miguel Torga, Fernando Pessoa, Luis Bernardo Honwana, and Mia Couto.

Assignments: midterm and final exams, and one final paper

HISP-P 401 #25481 4:00P-5:15P TR BH 229 Professor Luciana Namorato

Note: This course meets jointly with HISP-P 501.


HISP-P 420 Literatures of the Portuguese-Speaking World in Translation (3 credits)

This course will focus on the themes of travel and displacement in 19 th and 20 th-century works from Brazil, Portugal and Lusophone African in English translation. The course will begin by looking at novels by Machado de Assis and Eça de Queiroz, two major 19 th-century writers who wrote satires about individuals displaced in the countryside and the city. More contemporary works include the Mário de Andrade’s Macunaima, a fantastic tale about Brazilian racial identity, and Graciliano Ramos’ Barren Lives, a story about migrants and drought in the Brazilian Northeast. We will conclude the course by reading post-revolutionary works from Portugal and Africa, including Nobel Prize-winning author José Saramago’s Stone Raft, about an Iberian Peninsula’s aimlessly traveling around the Atlantic, and Lília Momplé’s story of families in war-torn Mozambique, Neighbours.

Requirements:

All students will write a midterm and final exam. They will also write a short research paper and present an in-class presentation on their work at the end of the semester.

HISP-P 420 #25487 2:30P-3:45P TR BH 214 Prof. Darlene Sadlier

Note: This class meets jointly with HISP-P 520 and CMLT-C 400 and CMLT-C 603


HISP-P 492 Reading Portuguese for Graduate Students (3 credits)

Prerequisite: P491

A continuation of P491.

HISP-P 492 #10718 11:15A-12:05P MWF BH 229 STAFF

 Note: This course will meet jointly with HISP-P 311.


HISP-P 494 Individual Readings in Luso-Brazilian Literature (1-3 credits)

Prerequisite: Consent of the department.

May be repeated for a maximum of up to 6 credit hours as long as each registration covers a different topic.

HISP-P 494 #10719 PERMISSION Arranged Professor Darlene Sadlier


HISP-P 495 Luso-Brazilian Colloquium (3 credits)
Topic: Trans-Atlantic and Other Travels in Lusophone Literature

The idea of travel is implicit in the novel whose structure is often described along the lines of an individual’s journey through society and life. Our course will be examining various literary genres in which the image of travel is a dominant or implicit motif. The course will begin in the medieval period with cantiga de amigos in which the woman laments the absence of her (traveling) lover. Examples of travel in Renaissance literature include a Gil Vicente play, Portuguese literature of exploration in Brazil, India, Africa and the Far East, and selections from Camões epic, Os Lusíadas. In addition to a few poems from the 17 th and 18 th centuries, we will read the romantic writer Almeida Garrett’s sentimental Viagens na Minha Terra, Machado de Assis’s amusing tale “A Parasita Azul,” and Eça de Queiroz’s novel about a decadent society, A Cidade e as Serras. More contemporary works will include stories by Brazilians Clarice Lispector, Elisa Lispector (Clarice’s sister), Guimarães Rosa and the novel Jangada de Pedra by Portugal’s Nobel Prize-winning author, José Saramago. Written on the eve of Portugal’s entry into the European Union, this unusual work describes an Iberian Peninsula broken off from Europe and traveling aimlessly around the Atlantic.

Requirements:

Students will write a midterm and final exam and a short research paper. They will give an in-class presentation on their work at the end of the semester.

HISP-P 495 #16322 1:00P-2:15P TR BH 214 Professor Darlene Sadlier

Note: This class meets jointly with HISP-P 695.


HISP-P 498 Portuguese Honors Seminar (3 credits)

This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Portuguese. This HISP-P 498, section 10720, meets with HISP-P 401 Literatures of the Portuguese-Speaking World II.

HISP-P 498 #10720 PERMISSION 4:00P-5:15P TR BH 229 Professor Luciana Namorato

Note: This course meets jointly with HISP-P 401 and HISP-P 501.

Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission: kallgood@indiana.edu

See course description for P401, Literatures of the Portuguese-Speaking World II below:
HISP-P 401 Literatures of the Portuguese Speaking World II (3credits)

The second semester of a two-semester survey on the literatures of the Portuguese-speaking world. In this course, we will examine the concept of “Realism”--its adoption, transformation, and rejection--by late nineteenth and twentieth-century Lusophone authors. We will read prose, poetry, and essays from Lusophone Africa, Brazil and Portugal. Authors include Aluísio Azevedo, Machado de Assis, Miguel Torga, Fernando Pessoa, Luis Bernardo Honwana, and Mia Couto.

Assignments: midterm and final exams, and one final paper


HISP-P 499 Honors Research in Portuguese (1-3 credits)

Prerequisite: P498

Approval of the Director of Portuguese Studies and the Chair of the Honors Committee.

P499 #10721 PERMISSION Arranged Professor Darlene Sadlier


HISP-S310 Spanish Grammar and Composition (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S275 or equivalent

This course integrates the four basic language skills into both a review of the major points of Spanish grammar and a structured approach to composition. Course work will combine grammar exercises with the writing of compositions of increasing length and complexity. Credit is given for only one of these courses, S310 or S311.

HISP-S 310 10830 8:00A-8:50A MWF Room=TBA STAFF
HISP-S 310 10827 9:05A-9:55A MWF FQ 012B STAFF
HISP-S 310 10831 9:30A-10:45A TR BH 314 Prof. Paula Sanmartín
       Above class 10831 open to Hutton Honors Students only. See Honors College for on-line permission.

HISP-S 310 10834 9:30A-10:45A TR BH 337 STAFF
HISP-S 310 10833 10:10A-11:00A MWF BH 135 STAFF
HISP-S 310 16594 11:15A-12:30P TR BH 337 Prof. Greg Schelonka
HISP-S 310 10828 11:15A-12:30P TR BH 222 Prof. Terri Greenslade
HISP-S 310 10836 1:00P-2:15P TR BH 241 Prof. Luciana Namorato
HISP-S 310 17363 1:00P-2:15P TR BH 222 STAFF
HISP-S 310 10829 1:25P-2:15P MWF BH 105 STAFF
HISP-S 310 10835 2:30P-3:45P TR BH 222 Prof. Greg Schelonka
HISP-S 310 10837 2:30P-3:45P TR BH 241 Prof. Paula Sanmartín


HISP-S312 Introduction to Expository Writing in Spanish (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or S311 or equivalent

This course integrates the four basic language skills into a structural approach to composition in Spanish. Some review of selected points of Spanish grammar will be included. Each student will write a weekly composition, increasing in length as the semester progresses. Emphasis will be on correct usage, vocabulary building, and stylistic control.

HISP-S 312 10838 9:05A-9:55A MWF WH 202 STAFF
HISP-S 312 10839 10:10A-11:00A MWF BH 011 STAFF
HISP-S 312 10840 1:00P-2:15P TR WH 112 STAFF
HISP-S 312 10841 4:00P-5:15P TR WH 202 Prof. Greg Schelonka


HISP-S315  Spanish in the Business World  (3 credits)

Prerequisite:  S310 or S311 or equivalent
 
This course focuses on the elements of vocabulary, protocol and style that are peculiar to commercial Spanish in speaking and writing.

Students will examine a wide range of materials (letters, job descriptions, advertisements, bank documents, import-export documents, etc.), practice oral business situations, and develop their ability to translate both from and to Spanish.  A great deal of emphasis will be placed on vocabulary building.  There will be two written exams, two oral exams, a final exam, portfolio, and homework assignments.

HISP-S 315 #10842 11:15A-12:05P MWF BH 238 Professor Silvana Falconi
HISP-S 315 #10843 11:15A-12:05P MWF BH 321 STAFF


HISP-S317 Spanish Conversation and Diction (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or S311 or equivalent

 This class meets five times a week. It includes contrastive study of Spanish and English pronunciation. Intensive controlled conversation correlated with readings, reports, debates, and group discussions. S317 may be repeated once for credit. S317 is NOT open to native speakers of Spanish.

 HISP-S 317 #10844 9:05A-9:55A Daily WH 112 STAFF

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Literatures in Spanish

HISP-S331 The Hispanic World I (3 credits)

Prerequisites S310 or S311 or equivalent

Una visión panorámica de la cultura literaria, histórica y política de América Latina en el Siglo XX. Pondremos especial énfasis en las características, los límites y la evolución de diferentes géneros: cuentos, poemas, drama, testimonio, novela y ensayos. La asistencia y discusión en clase afectarán la calificación final. Los alumnos harán cuatro composiciones y un examen parcial. Habrá examen final.

Bibliografía

Jorge Boccanera: La pasión de los poetas. Sabina Berman: Entre Villa y una mujer desnuda. Gustavo Sainz: Gazapo. Octavio Paz: La llama doble. Gustavo Sainz: Juegos prohibidos.

 Note: Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333

HISP-S 331 #10848 8:00A-9:15A TR BH 337 Professor Gustavo Sainz
HISP-S 331 #10853 9:30A-10:45A TR BH 231 Professor Gustavo Sainz


HISP-S331 The Hispanic World I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent

The aim of this class is to study the literature and culture of Spanish America through the reading, discussion, and study of representative texts taken primarily from the 20th century. A play, a variety of prose narratives, and poetry selections too, will serve this purpose.

Mini-essays, quizzes, and a final paper will be correlative framework of the proposed studies involved. Note: Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333

HISP-S 331 #10852 10:10A-11:00A MWF BH 141 Professor Luis Dávila


HISP-S331 The Hispanic World I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent

Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333

Study of Hispanic literature and culture through the analysis and discussion of representative literary works from Spanish America. Includes an introduction to narrative, poetry, and theater. Taught in Spanish.

HISP-S 331 #10849 12:20P-1:10P MWF BH 018 STAFF


HISP-S331 The Hispanic World I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent

 “Race, Class, Gender and Ethnicity and the Construction of Identity in Spanish American Literature”

This course provides and introduction to literature from Spanish America in order to examine how the interactions of race, class, gender and ethnicity affect the construction of individual and national identities. In addition to this thematic emphasis, through an analysis of a selection of nineteenth and twentieth-century texts, students will learn how to become critical and imaginative readers of literary works, developing skills for analyzing five different genres: essay, short story, poetry, drama and the novel. In addition, we will also look at testimonio, a relatively new “genre” which became popular in Spanish America during the second half of the twentieth century, and we will watch at least one film, in order to learn how to analyze the relationship of the cinematic medium to literature.

Readings will be drawn from the work of Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Ana Lydia Vega, Rubén Darío, Gabriela Mistral, Pablo Neruda, Nicolás Guillén, Nancy Morejón and Rosario Ferré among others.

The final grade will be determined on the basis of participation in class discussion, written assignments, short papers, a midterm and a final exam. The course will be taught entirely in Spanish, and all the assignments will be in Spanish as well.

Note: Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333

HISP-S 331 #10854 1:00P-2:15P TR BH 011 Professor Paula Sanmartín


HISP-S331 The Hispanic World I (3 credits) (Honors section)

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent

Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333

This course introduces students to the concepts of literary analysis and the poetics of different genres. We will read an excellent selection of Spanish-American literary texts, including poetry from Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda to Alfonsina Storni, short stories from Julio Cortázar to Jorge Luis Borges, an essay by José Martí, a dramatic work by René Marqués, and a short novel by Carlos Fuentes. Students will learn how to better understand, analyze, and interpret literary texts, preparing themselves for upper-level literature classes. The goal is to learn how to read texts closely, ask critical and informed questions of them, and consider their cultural, political, and historical contexts. The final grade will be based on class preparation (readings, written assignments, attendance), three short papers (each focusing on a different genre), and a midterm and final exam.

HISP-S 331 #10851 1:25P-2:15P MWF BH 214 Professor Estela Vieira

Note: This class open to Hutton Honors College Students Only. Obtain on-line permission for this class from Hutton Honors College.


HISP-S331 The Hispanic World I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent

Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333

Study of Hispanic literature and culture through the analysis and discussion of representative literary works from Spanish America. Includes an introduction to narrative, poetry, and theater. Taught in Spanish.

HISP-S 331 #10856 2:30P-3:20P MWF BH 241 STAFF


HISP-S332 The Hispanic World II (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S331 or equivalent.

Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333

This course will explore the main aspects of love ― altruistic, erotic and divine ― in Spanish literature. The readings will include prose works (Unamuno´s San Manuel Bueno, mártir and Nada menos que todo un hombre), drama (García Lorca’s La casa de Bernarda Alba), poetry (romances, selected poems of Garcilaso de la Vega, San Juan de la Cruz, Bécquer, Machado, etc.) and essays (selections from Ortega y Gasset’s Estudios sobre el amor). In our close reading of these works we will focus on the historical and cultural circumstances in which they were written; on the social context, the ethical values, and gender issues they reflect; on the literary trends and genres to which they belong, and on other pertinent questions of literary theory and interpretation.

The specific aim of the course is on the one hand to sharpen the literary insight and widen the cultural horizons of the students and on the other to improve their speaking and writing abilities in Spanish. Students will be evaluated on the basis of their participation in class, several written assignments, and two exams.

HISP-S 332 #10857 1:00P-5:15P TR BH 321 Professor Olga Impey
HISP-S 332 #10857 4:00P-5:15P TR BH 322 Professor Olga Impey


HISP-S332 The Hispanic World II (3 credits)
Topic: “What’s love got to do with it?”: Eros in Spanish Literature and Film.

Prerequisite: S331 or equivalent

Building on the knowledge already acquired in S331, this course will further explore the creative mechanics of different types of literary texts (fiction, poetry, theater) and film in Spanish. The object of the course is to provide you with the necessary tools and vocabulary for textual analysis, foster critical thinking and creative engagement with texts, and help you improve your analytical and argumentative writing skills in Spanish. The ultimate goal is to help you become a better, more active, and more sophisticated reader while enhancing your enjoyment of literature and film. Love (in its widest sense: friendship, affection, fondness, passion, desire, sex, etc.) is arguably the most recurring literary topic of all times and we will use it as a general thematic framework for the course. Although usually presented as a universal emotion, love, like literature and film, is also conditioned by cultural, social, and historical factors. As we do our readings, we will pay attention to the cultural construction of eroticism in Spanish literature and film: from an individual emotion to a feeling of solidarity with humankind and a tool for change. As we study a variety of texts, we may reflect upon them as vehicles for expression and representation of love (does writing about love affect the form of what we write? is poetry better suited for love than theater? how is love represented in such different mediums as poetry and film?), and as sites for both contesting and reproducing dominant ideas on nation, religion, race, gender, sexuality, etc. (what role does literature have in perpetuating the image of woman as sexual/love object? is it possible to write about love outside the male and/or heterosexual literary tradition?). Although the topic of love will be a common thread and organizing principle of the materials, it should not be understood as a limit to our interpretations and discussions in class. Class attendance and participation are essential to the success of the course. Assignments may include one in-class presentation, short papers, a midterm and a final exam. The course will be conducted entirely in Spanish.

HISP-S 332 #10858 2:30P-3:20P MWF BH 214 Professor Alejandro Mejías-López


HISP-S419 Modern Spanish Prose Fiction (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S331 and S332 or equivalent

In this course we will read 20 th-century novels by male and female Spanish authors from Miguel de Unamuno to contemporary writers. The focus will be on narrative technique, social problems, and the cultural construction of gender. The course will also incorporate a few recent Spanish films.

The key component of the course is daily class discussion of various aspects of each novel. One short paper (1-2 pages) on each novel and one longer final paper (6-8 pages) will complement the oral analysis of the texts. There will also be a final exam. The course is taught in Spanish; Spanish is the language of class discussion and of all written work for the course.

HISP-S 419 #25489 1:00P-2:15P TR BH 141 Professor Maryellen Bieder


HISP-S 472 Spanish American Literature II (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S331 and S332 or equivalent

This course picks up where S471 leaves off, providing a survey of Spanish American literature from the end of the 19 th century through the present. We will examine the major innovations in poetics that characterize turn-of-the-century modernismo, twentieth-century avant garde movements, as well as the “Boom” writers and beyond, while also posing questions about how Spanish American literary history has been constructed. Literary works will be studied in relation to social and political contexts. This course is also designed to help students become better critical readers.

Primary texts will include poetry by Darío, Martí, Agustini, Huidobro, Vallejo, Neruda, Mistral and Pizarnik; short stories by Quiroga, Rulfo, Borges, Cortázar, Fuentes, Garro, García Márquez, Peri Rossi, Walsh, and Valenzuela; and a medium-length novel by Bolaño. Short critical readings will also be assigned.

Evaluation will be based on class participation, short writing assignments, an exam, and two papers including a final research project.

HISP-S 472 #25493 12:20P- 1:10P MWF BH 238 Professor Patrick Dove

Note: This course meets jointly with HISP-S 498 Honors Seminar, #10865.


HISP-S 480 Argentine Literature (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S331 and S332 or equivalent

This course provides an in-depth exploration of the Argentine literary tradition from the early 19 th century through the present. We will examine the significant aesthetic innovations taking place within this history, while also looking at how literary writers have responded to and intervened in important social problems and political events in Argentine and Latin American history (civil war, nation-building, modernization, immigration, popular revolutions, military dictatorship, and so on).

Primary texts will include essays, short stories, poems, a play, a medium-length novel, and one or two films. Authors include Echeverría, Sarmiento, Hernández, Mansilla, Lugones, Agustini, Borges, Ocampo, Cortázar, Walsh, Piglia, Shua, Gambaro, and Saer. There will also be short critical and contextual readings.

Evaluation will be based on class participation, short written assignments, a presentation, and two papers (including a final research project).

HISP-S 480 #25494 10:10A-11:00A MWF BH 137 Professor Patrick Dove


HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S331 and S332 or equivalent

This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish. This S498, section 10865 meets with S472, Spanish American Literature II. If you are leaning toward literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this S498 course. Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for your permission.

HISP-S 498 #10865 12:20P-1:10P MWF BH 238 Professor Patrick Dove

Note: This course meets jointly with HISP-S 472. See S472 description below.
HISP-S 472 Spanish American Literature II (3 credits) Literature

Prerequisite: S331 and S332 or equivalent

This course picks up where S471 leaves off, providing a survey of Spanish American literature from the end of the 19 th century through the present. We will examine the major innovations in poetics that characterize turn-of-the-century modernismo, twentieth-century avant garde movements, as well as the “Boom” writers and beyond, while also posing questions about how Spanish American literary history has been constructed. Literary works will be studied in relation to social and political contexts. This course is also designed to help students become better critical readers.

Primary texts will include poetry by Darío, Martí, Agustini, Huidobro, Vallejo, Neruda, Mistral and Pizarnik; short stories by Quiroga, Rulfo, Borges, Cortázar, Fuentes, Garro, García Márquez, Peri Rossi, Walsh, and Valenzuela; and a medium-length novel by Bolaño. Short critical readings will also be assigned.

Evaluation will be based on class participation, short writing assignments, an exam, and two papers including a final research project.

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Hispanic Linguistics

HISP-S326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent  

Introduces the basic concepts of Hispanic linguistics and establishes the background for the future application of linguistic principles. The course surveys linguistic properties in Spanish, including phonology, morphology, and syntax. Additional introductory material on historical linguistics, second language acquisition, semantics, and sociolinguistics will be included. This course carries N & M credit.  

HISP-S 326 #17345 9:05A-9:55A MWF BH 137 STAFF  

Note to majors who started at IU prior to Fall 2003 : HISP-S 326 can fulfill the 400-level linguistics requirement.


HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3 credits)

Prerequisites: S310 or equivalent.  

This course introduces the basic concepts of linguistics as applied to the Spanish language and establishes a foundation for future courses in Spanish linguistics. The course surveys the linguistic components of Spanish, including phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Additional material on language and the brain, second language acquisition, language variation, languages in contact, and language and culture is included. This course carries N & M credit.  

HISP-S326 #10846 9:30A-10:45A TR BH 233 Professor Terri Greenslade

Note to majors who started at IU prior to Fall 2003: HISP-S 326 can fulfill the 400-level linguistics requirement.


HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent

This course examines the basic linguistic structure of Spanish based on the principal fields of linguistic studies.  The course begins with an overview of the characteristics of human language.  Course topics include the structure and order of words (syntax), the forms and structure of words (morphology), the sounds of Spanish (phonetics and phonology) and how they compare with English, and finally how Spanish varies across regions and due to social considerations.

Class time is primarily lecture based, but also includes linguistic exercises, analysis, and discussion.  Course activities include self analysis of Spanish abilities and comparison with native speakers (the goal being to improve the student’s language abilities by contrastive analysis of linguistic structure).  Evaluation is based on participation, homework assignments, projects, exams and presentations. This course carries N & M credit.

HISP-S 326 #10847 1:00P-2:15P TR BH240 Professor Erik Willis

Note to majors who started at IU prior to Fall 2003: HISP-S 326 can fulfill the 400-level linguistics requirement.


HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics  (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent.

This course provides an introduction to Hispanic Linguistics and establishes the basis for future application of linguistic principles. The content included is an overview of basic linguistic properties with a focus on Spanish. The course begins with an exploration of the sound system of Spanish and its theoretical representation. Building on this, the discussion continues with topics in Spanish morphology such as word formation and verbal inflection. Finally, issues in syntax and semantics are analyzed both in isolation and in terms of their relationship to each other. A coursepack of article-length readings will be included to introduce the following areas: historical linguistics, second language acquisition, semantics, and sociolinguistics.  The goal of this course is to provide students with a level of knowledge that enables them to succeed in future Hispanic Linguistics courses.

Course Requirements:
Attendance and Participation  (10%)
Class Presentation  (12%)
Unit Exams  (45%)
Homework  (10%)
Course projects (23%)

This course carries N & M credit.

HISP-S 326 #15387 2:30P-3:45P TR BH 233 Professor Kimberly Geeslin

Note to majors who matriculated prior to Fall 2003:  S326 can fulfill the 400-level linguistics requirement.


HISP-S 425 Spanish Phonetics (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent for those students who matriculated prior to Fall 2003.

S326 for those students who matriculate Fall 2003 or after.

Course Description:

This course examines the sound system of Spanish with particular attention to the articulatory properties of vowels and consonants. The course begins with a description and discussion of fundamental concepts in Spanish phonetics and phonology with practical applications for improving the student’s pronunciation of Spanish. Students will also learn the organs of the vocal tract that are responsible for the production of sounds. A primary goal of this course is to learn and practice the general principles of phonetic transcription which will be applied to samples of different dialects of the Spanish-Speaking world. Some of the other topics in this course include: the structure of the syllable, (re)syllabification, intonation and stress in Spanish, and regular phonological processes that affect pronunciation at the word, sentence, and discourse level. In addition, phonological changes which occurred from Old to Modern Spanish will be analyzed. Finally, this course will examine and compare phonological variation in different varieties of Spanish and explain how this variation is subject to both linguistic and social factors.

 HISP-S 425 #10863 2:30P-3:20P MWF BH 105 Professor César Félix-Brasdefer

Note: This class HISP S 425 meets jointly with HISP-S 498, Honors. #10866


HISP-S 495 Hispanic Colloquium (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent for those students who matriculated prior to Fall 2003.

S326 for those students who matriculate Fall 2003 or after.

Topic:Spanish Syntax: Syntactic Variation in the Spanish-Speaking World

Course Description:

Syntax represents one of the core areas of linguistics and is broadly defined as the study of the combinatorial properties of sentences. It examines the internal structure of the sentence (simple and compound) and how certain phrases within the sentence are combined in different word orders to produce a specific meaning. After an examination of the fundamental concepts of morphology with regard to the internal structure of lexical categories (noun, verb, adjective, pronouns, adverbs, preposition, conjunction), the course will analyze how these words combine to form syntactic categories at the sentence level (noun phrase, verb phrase, adjectival phrase, adverbial phrase, prepositional phrase). Some of the topics include: the notion of subject, transitivity, word order, focus, the pronominal system in Spanish, quantifiers, negation, the verbal system, the Spanish se, transformations (question formation, subject-verb inversion), and the active and passive voices. The relationship between syntax (sentence structure) and pragmatics (speaker’s intentional meaning) will be examined with examples from Spanish. Overall, knowledge of syntax is aimed at improving the learners’ proficiency level of Spanish and fostering an awareness of the syntactic variation present across the Spanish-Speaking world.

HISP-S 495 #14670 1:25P-2:15P MWF BH322 Professor César Félix-Brasdefer


HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent for those students who matriculated prior to Fall 2003.

S326 for those students who matriculate Fall 2003 or after.

 This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish. This S498, section 10866 meets with S425, Spanish Phonetics. If you are leaning toward linguistics for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this S498 course. Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for your permission.

HISP-S 498 #10866 PERMISSION 2:30P-3:20P MWF BH 105 Professor César Félix-Brasdefer

Note: This course meets jointly with HISP-S 425. This HISP-S 498 will count toward the 400-level linguistics requirement. See S425 description below.

HISP-S 425 Spanish Phonetics (3 credits) Linguistics

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent for those students who matriculated prior to Fall 2003.

S326 for those students who matriculate Fall 2003 or after.

Course Description:

This course examines the sound system of Spanish with particular attention to the articulatory properties of vowels and consonants. The course begins with a description and discussion of fundamental concepts in Spanish phonetics and phonology with practical applications for improving the student’s pronunciation of Spanish. Students will also learn the organs of the vocal tract that are responsible for the production of sounds. A primary goal of this course is to learn and practice the general principles of phonetic transcription which will be applied to samples of different dialects of the Spanish-Speaking world. Some of the other topics in this course include: the structure of the syllable, (re)syllabification, intonation and stress in Spanish, and regular phonological processes that affect pronunciation at the word, sentence, and discourse level. In addition, phonological changes which occurred from Old to Modern Spanish will be analyzed. Finally, this course will examine and compare phonological variation in different varieties of Spanish and explain how this variation is subject to both linguistic and social factors.

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Hispanic Culture

HISP-S275 Introduction to Hispanic Culture (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S250 or equivalent.

This course serves as a bridge between the S200 and S300 levels and is designed to increase proficiency in Spanish in the four skills areas (listening, reading, writing, and speaking) through reading, writing, and discussion of Hispanic culture. S275 also serves to review and expand upon Spanish grammar elements studied at the 100 through 200 levels. The format of the course includes a discussion of readings and assigned topics, focused writing, and the writing of compositions. Evaluation is based on quizzes, tests, compositions, homework, participation, and oral presentations. This course is required for minors and majors unless the student tested into the 300 level. Course conducted in Spanish. See Schedule of Classes for class numbers, times, days, and rooms.

NOTE: Students who test out or place above S275 will need to replace its 3 credits with an extra course at the S300 or S400 level.


HISP-S 411  SPAIN: The Cultural Context (3credits)

Prerequisite: S331 or equivalent

 This course studies the cultural history of Spain. We begin with the medieval times and the thriving Arab presence; continue to Spain’s Golden Age, overseas empire, and subsequent periods of political turmoil and progress. This background will help our primary focus: to understand the radical political and cultural changes that Spain experiences throughout the twentieth century through today, from Spain’s Civil War, to Franco’s Regime, to the cultural revolution of the democratic period. The objective of the course is to develop a critical, well-informed, and complex understanding of what defines Spain’s diverse cultural makeup and production . To do this we will have to become critical and avid readers and interpreters of a variety of cultural artifacts, including paintings, films, music, architecture, and literary texts.

HISP-S 411 #10861 11:15A-12:05P MWF BH141 Professor Estela Vieira

Note: This course carries culture studies credit.


HISP-S 411 SPAIN: The Cultural Context (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S331 or equivalent

This course presents a cultural history of Spain, from the early times to the present, with an emphasis on contemporary society. The purpose is to study the culture of the past for a better understanding of the present Spanish society. This panoramic view will concentrate on the study of political, economic, and historical aspects. In addition, we will examine diverse cultural artifacts (art, architecture, literature, music, journalism and contemporary films) to explore the heterogeneity of Spain. It will be conducted entirely in Spanish. Grades will be based in active participation, assignments, oral presentations, several exams, and a final paper.

HISP-S 411 #10862 9:30A-10:45A TR BH 245 Prof. Reyes Vila-Belda

Note: This course carries culture studies credit.

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Individual Readings

HISP-S 494 Individual Readings in Hispanic Studies (1-3 credits)

Prerequisite: Consent of the department. Call (812) 855-8612 to set up an appointment to discuss this course with the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

This course is by permission only. This course is used only in emergencies pertaining to graduating seniors who are short credit hours for graduation. This course does not count toward any 400-level course needed for the Spanish major. This course may be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

HISP-S 494 #10864 PERMISSION NEEDED Arranged Professor Carl Good


Honors Research

HISP-S 499 Honors Research in Spanish ( 1-3 credits)

Prerequisite: Approval of the honors advisor BY AUTHORIZATION ONLY

Majors doing honors in Spanish would register for this class after they have completed S498 Readings in Honors and while they are writing their honors thesis. Contact Karla Allgood via email at kallgood@indiana.edu or see in person in BH 844 for permission arrangements.

HISP-S 499 #10867 PERMISSION Arranged Professor Luis Dávila

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