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Undergraduate Studies

Undergraduate Course Descriptions: Spring 2014

Catalan
Portuguese
Spanish 100 AND 200-LEVEL
Spanish 300-LEVEL
Spanish 400-LEVEL

  • Courses, times, days, rooms, and/or instructors are subject to change.
  • Please review the entire course description. Multiple descriptions may be listed for courses with multiple sections.

  • CATALAN

    HISP-C 492  Readings in Catalan for Graduate Students  (3 credits)
    Variable Title:  Architecture and Urban Space in Modern Catalan Literature     
        
      
    This course will study the cultural and social meaning of architecture in Catalonia from the nineteenth century until the present day, focusing especially on the urban development of modern Barcelona. Catalonia’s politics of space constitute a fascinating mixture of splendid architecture (Gaudí is only one example among many others) and nation-building policies that sometimes have expressed and sometimes have repressed the class struggles that traverse Catalonia’s modern history. The course will examine the historical evolution of Catalonia’s politics of space through a variety of Catalan literary texts and other cultural artifacts. Also, the course will include a series of more general texts on urban theory that will allow us to understand the context of Catalonia and Barcelona vis-à-vis Spain, Europe, and globalization.

    HISP-C 492    #26594   9:30A-10:45A     TR   BH 333   Prof. Edgar Illas
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-C 618 Topics in Catalan Literature


    HISP-C 494    Individual Readings in Catalan Studies   (1-3 credits)
    Variable Title: Architecture and Urban Space in Modern Catalan Literature

    This course will study the cultural and social meaning of architecture in Catalonia from the nineteenth century until the present day, focusing especially on the urban development of modern Barcelona. Catalonia’s politics of space constitute a fascinating mixture of splendid architecture (Gaudí is only one example among many others) and nation-building policies that sometimes have expressed and sometimes have repressed the class struggles that traverse Catalonia’s modern history. The course will examine the historical evolution of Catalonia’s politics of space through a variety of Catalan literary texts and other cultural artifacts. Also, the course will include a series of more general texts on urban theory that will allow us to understand the context of Catalonia and Barcelona vis-à-vis Spain, Europe, and globalization.

    HISP-C 492   #23887  9:30A-10:45A  TR   BH 333   Prof. Edgar Illas
    Note: This class meets with HISP-C 492 Readings in Catalan for Graduate Students and
                  HISP-C 618 Topics in Catalan Literature
    Note:  This class, HISP-C 494 does not count toward the major or minor in Spanish.
    Note:  This class requires permission from the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Call office at (812) 855-8612 to set up an appointment with the Director.

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    PORTUGUESE

    HISP-P 135 Intensive Portuguese (4 credits) 
    For students from secondary school placed into the second semester of first‑year study or those with a strong background in Spanish or another Romance Language.  Content of P100 and P150 covered at an accelerated pace.  Credit not given for both P135 and P150.   This course can count for the Spanish major 300/400 level elective.

    HISP-P 135  #18368   9:05A-9:55A   MTWR    SB 138     STAFF 
    Note: This class meets with HISP-P 491.


    HISP-P 150 Elementary Portuguese II (4 credits) 
    Prerequisite: P100 or equivalent

    Introduction to present‑day Portuguese, with an interactive, communicative focus and structured drills for mastery of phonology, basic structural patterns, and functional vocabulary.   To be taken in sequence after P100, Elementary Portuguese I. Attendance in language laboratory may be required.

    HISP-P 150  #18369   10:10A-11:00A    MTWR    SB 138    STAFF


    HISP-P 250 Second‑Year Portuguese II (3 credits) 
    Prerequisite: P200 or equivalent. 

    Second semester of second‑year Portuguese, with increased emphasis on communicative exercises and selected readings. Attendance in the language laboratory may be required.                      

    HISP-P 250   #23888    10:10A-11:00A    MWF    BH 134   STAFF
    HISP-P 250   #28771    10:10A-11:00A    MWF    BH 314   STAFF      


    HISP-P 317 Reading & Conversation in Portuguese   (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: P200-P250 or equivalent

    Taught in Portuguese, this course emphasizes conversational and reading skills using plays, short stories, poetry, and novels from Brazil, Portugal, and Lusophone Africa.  Students will also be introduced to the basics of literary appreciation.             

    HISP-P 317    #22270       11:15A-12:05P    MWF     BH 333    STAFF
    Note:  This course meets with HISP-P 492.


    HISP-P 476  Prose in Portuguese  (3 credits)
    Variable Title:  Essay

    The essay has an extensive and significant tradition in Luso-Brazilian literature. This course will survey essayistic writing by representative authors from Portugal, Brazil, and Lusophone Africa from the seventeenth century to the present. We will read selections from Padre António Vieira, influential Enlightenment thinkers, Generation of 1870 writers, as well as manifestos and compositions central to Portuguese and Brazilian modernism. We will also pay particular attention to twentieth-century and contemporary writing by anthropologists, literary historians, and philosophers, such as Gilberto Freyre, Silviano Santiago, Antonio Cândido, Eduardo Lourenço, Gilberto Gil, among others. Our task will be to study the aesthetic debates and the sociopolitical contexts informing these texts, reflect on how these intellectual traditions have shaped Lusophone literary history and culture, as well as to study the form and method of the genre.

    HISP-P 476    #29856    2:30P-3:45P    TR    BH 232   Prof. Estela Vieira
    Note: This class meets with HISP-P 576.


    HISP-P 491 Elementary Portuguese for Graduate Students  (3 credits)

    An accelerated introduction to the structure of the Portuguese language, covering in one semester content matter usually reviewed in two semesters.  This course is taught in Portuguese.

    HISP-P 491    #28551     9:05A-9:55A   MTWR    SB 138    STAFF
    Note:  This course meets with  HISP-P 135 and is only open to Graduate students.


    HISP-P 492 Reading Portuguese for Graduate Students (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: P491

    This course is taught in Portuguese.  A continuation of P491. This course emphasizes conversational and reading skills using plays, short stories, poetry, and novels from Brazil, Portugal, and Lusophone Africa.  Students will also be introduced to the basics of literary appreciation.

    HISP-P 492   #18370     11:15A-12:05P    MWF     BH 333     STAFF

    Note: This course meets with HISP-P 317 and is only open to Graduate students.


    HISP-P 494 Individual Readings in Luso-Brazilian Literature  (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Consent of the department. 

    May be repeated for a maximum of up to 6 credit hours as long as each registration covers a different topic.

    HISP-P 494    #18371    PERMISSION   Arranged        Professor Darlene Sadlier

    Note:  Call the department at (812) 855-8612 for permission for this course.


    HISP-P 495  Luso-Brazilian Colloquium  (3 credits)
    Variable Title:  The Lusophone Diaspora in Literature and the Arts

    Exploration and migration are characteristics of the Portuguese nation, whose maritime citizenry sailed to new lands, conquered peoples and gradually colonized Brazil and parts of Africa, India, China and Japan. Their largely seafaring enterprise in the 16th century resulted in the world’s first global empire.

    This course focuses on works by 20th- century authors, filmmakers and artists whose works portray historical and contemporary movements of Portuguese-speaking people within the widespread Lusophone world. A good example is Ferreira de Castro’s 1930 novel A selva,about economic crisis in Portugal and mass migration to the Amazon at the turn of the 19th century. We will also read texts about the Salazar dictatorship’s attempt to maintain the African colonies by sending thousands of Portuguese to fight an unwinnable war in Angola and Mozambique. The course will consider how displaced people cope in “foreign lands”—which Pedro Costa examines in his film oeuvre about Cape Verdean migrants in Lisbon and Brazilian director Walter Salles explores in Terra estrangeira. Our course will also ask questions about the significance of the word “homeland” today as a result of constantly moving populations in the Portuguese-speaking world.

    HISP-P 495   #29865     4:00P-5:15P    MW    BH 140    Prof. Darlene Sadlier
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-P 498 and HISP-P 695.


    HISP-P 498  Portuguese Honors Seminar  (3 credits)  

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Portuguese.  This HISP-P 498, section #18372 meets with HISP-P 495 and HISP- P 695 Luso-Brazilian Colloquium. ,Variable Title is The Lusophone Diaspora in Literature and the Arts.

    HISP-P 498  #18372    PERMISSION    4:00P-5:15P  MW    BH 140    Professor Darlene Sadlier
    Note: Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission.   kallgood@indiana.edu

    Description for the HIS-P495 class is as follows:

    Exploration and migration are characteristics of the Portuguese nation, whose maritime citizenry sailed to new lands, conquered peoples and gradually colonized Brazil and parts of Africa, India, China and Japan. Their largely seafaring enterprise in the 16th century resulted in the world’s first global empire.

    This course focuses on works by 20th- century authors, filmmakers and artists whose works portray historical and contemporary movements of Portuguese-speaking people within the widespread Lusophone world. A good example is Ferreira de Castro’s 1930 novel A selva,about economic crisis in Portugal and mass migration to the Amazon at the turn of the 19th century. We will also read texts about the Salazar dictatorship’s attempt to maintain the African colonies by sending thousands of Portuguese to fight an unwinnable war in Angola and Mozambique. The course will consider how displaced people cope in “foreign lands”—which Pedro Costa examines in his film oeuvre about Cape Verdean migrants in Lisbon and Brazilian director Walter Salles explores in Terra estrangeira. Our course will also ask questions about the significance of the word “homeland” today as a result of constantly moving populations in the Portuguese-speaking world.


    HISP-P 499  Honors Research in Portuguese  (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-P 498
    By Permission Only:  Call (812) 855-8612 or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu

    Approval of the Director of Portuguese Studies and the Chair of the Honors Committee.

    HISP-P 499   #18373   PERMISSION    Arranged   Professor Darlene Sadlier


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    Spanish 100 & 200-LEVEL

    HISP-S 100 Elementary Spanish  (4 credits)  
    By permission only.  Call (812) 855-8612 or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu

    The course presents a four‑skills approach to Spanish with an emphasis on critical thinking skills. Students will practice speaking in small groups in class as well as reading and discussing materials in Spanish. Grading is based on exams, homework, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Enrollment in S100 is restricted to those with less than 2 years of high school Spanish or with the consent of the department. All others must enroll in S105. The next course in the sequence for HISP-S 100 students would be HISP-S 150 Elementary Spanish II.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2014 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S. 


    HISP-S 105  First Year Spanish (4 credits)

    This introductory course is for students with 2 or more years of high-school study and covers the essential grammar and vocabulary of first-year Spanish. This course presents a four-skills approach to Spanish with an emphasis on critical thinking skills.  Students will practice speaking in small groups in class as well as reading and discussing materials in Spanish.  Grading is based on exams, homework, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Homework load is substantial. Credit not given for both HISP-S 105 and HISP-S 100 or HISP-S 105 and HISP-S150.The next course in this sequence is HISP-S 200 Second-Year Spanish I.  

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2014 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 150 Elementary Spanish II (4 credits)  
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 100

    This course continues the work of S100 with continued emphasis on all four skills and on critical thinking skills. Students will practice speaking in small groups in class, as well as reading and discussing materials in Spanish. Grading is based on exams, homework, compositions, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. The next course in this sequence is HISP-S 200 Second-Year Spanish I.

    Note: HISP-S 150 is for those students who took HISP-S 100 Elementary Spanish here at IUB or took an equivalent course at a regional campus or other university.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2014 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 200 Second‑Year Spanish I    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 105 or HISP-S 150 or equivalent. 

    This course reviews some of the basic structures studied in the first year, and examines them in greater detail. Emphasis remains on the four skills and on critical thinking skills. Cultural readings and a mystery story are also included. Grades are based on exams, homework, compositions, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Homework load is substantial. The next course in this sequence is HISP-S 250 Second-Year Spanish II.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2014 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 250 Second‑Year Spanish II  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 200 or equivalent. 

    This course continues the work of HISP-S 200 with a continued emphasis on the four skills and on critical thinking skills.  Short literary readings are also included. Grades are based on exams, homework, compositions, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Homework load is substantial. After successful completion of this course, the foreign language requirement is fulfilled for schools that require a 4th -semester proficiency. For those students who wish to go on for a minor or major in Spanish, the next course to take would be HISP-S 280 Spanish Grammar in Context.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2014 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 280  Spanish Grammar in Context (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: S250 or equivalent.

    The overall goal of this course is to provide students with the language skills necessary to pursue upper division course work in Spanish. The main focus is on the development of formal linguistic skills through explicit grammar instruction and review, vocabulary building exercises, reading original texts by contemporary authors, and exploring the link between literature and culture through writing and conversation.
    The main objective of S280 is to strengthen students’ comprehension and application of the most challenging grammatical structures for second language learners within a meaningful language context. This objective will be accomplished with a thorough review and practice of problematic grammatical structures, the analysis of these and other structures in the context provided by a series of literary readings and selections from an audio book, and the application of these structures in writing and discussion sessions. The course will be conducted in Spanish.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/   Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2014 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


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    Spanish 300-LEVEL

    HISP-S 308 Composition and Conversation in Spanish (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.  Co-requisite: may be taken concurrent with HISP-S 280.

    The objective of this course is to develop students’ oral and writing abilities in Spanish.  Students will develop writing skill in Spanish by learning and practicing the main components of different writing styles: description, narration, exposition, and argumentation.  Students will learn compositional elements that provide cohesion and coherence in both formal and informal writing styles.  Students will develop their oral skills by watching and discussing a number of critically acclaimed films from different Spanish-speaking countries which deal with a variety of cultural, social, and political issues.  To achieve the goal of improving oral proficiency, students will participate in various in-class discussions and debates on controversial topics presented in the films.  By the end of this course, students will be able to write in a variety of formal and informal writing styles and to discuss a wide range of topics.

    To see active sections available for spring 2014 go to schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, chose spring 2014.  We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 315  Spanish in the Business World  (3 credits) 
    Prerequisite: S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    El objetivo de este curso es promocionar el entendimiento cultural internacional en el mundo de los negocios por medio del estudio del lenguaje comercial y del conocimiento de sus códigos y costumbres. Este objetivo se persigue de dos formas. Por un lado, se aspira a familiarizar al estudiante con el lenguaje comercial escrito y hablado y se trabajará con documentos variados -- cartas comerciales, descripciones de trabajo, anuncios, formularios bancarios y de importación y exportación, etc. --. Además, los estudiantes aprenderán a leer, escribir y traducir documentos comerciales y practicarán conversaciones sobre diversas situaciones de negocios. Por otro lado, se introducirá al estudiante en el conocimiento de las costumbres, protocolo y prácticas culturales propias del mundo comercial hispano. Por medio de casos prácticos se analizarán estereotipos culturales y se cuestionarán comportamientos y conductas éticas del comercio internacional. En definitiva, se buscará sensibilizar al estudiante a conocer, entender, respetar o criticar prácticas culturales del mundo de negocios hispano. Este curso se dictará únicamente en español. El prerrequisito de este curso es S280.

    HISP-S 315  #25249    9:05A-9:55A   MWF        BH 237          STAFF


    HISP-S 317 Spanish Conversation & Diction (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This class meets five times a week. It includes contrastive study of Spanish and English pronunciation.  Intensive controlled conversation correlated with readings, reports, debates, and group discussions.  S317 may be repeated once for credit.  S317 is NOT open to native speakers of Spanish.

    HISP-S 317   #18453        9:05A-9:55A      MTWRF       BH 135          STAFF
    HISP-S 317  #22269       11:15A-12:05P    MTWRF       BH 142          STAFF


    HISP-S 324 Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Cultures (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This course offers an introduction to the cultural history of Spain and Latin America, from the conquests of Spain and America through the twenty-first century. Our main text is Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes’s book El espejo enterrado, complemented by films, artworks and shorter literary and historical texts. Students learn about the key events and the fundamental ideas and concerns that have shaped Hispanic cultures across the centuries, such as processes of conquest and colonialism, nation formation, modernization, and the changing roles of religion, race and gender. Through discussions, written compositions and exams, students learn to critically read and understand Hispanic cultures, and to develop original arguments in written and spoken Spanish.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    To see active sections available for fall 2014 go to schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, chose fall 2014.  We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.      

    This course provides a general introduction to the field of Hispanic Linguistics and establishes a foundation in the major areas of linguistics in order to prepare students for future courses in Linguistics. After an introduction on the nature of language and to the field of linguistics, the course provides a description of the sound system of Spanish through the study of phonetics and phonology. This unit includes the presentation of the principles of phonetic transcription as well as important phonological processes. Next, basic concepts in morphology, the structure of words, will be examined, including a description of the general principles of the formation of nouns, adjectives, adverbs, and verbs. Then, in order to examine how words combine at the sentence level, we will study the basic concepts of sentence structure (syntax) and its connection to meaning (semantics). The course ends with an overview of some of the basic concepts of language use in context (pragmatics) and linguistic variation (sociolinguistics).

    This class carries COLL (CASE) N & M credit.

    HISP-S 326    #23928     Honors       1:00P-2:15P      MW       BH 319           Prof. César Félix-Brasdefer
    Note:  This class is for Hutton Honors students and meets with a HISP-S 326 non-honors section.

    HISP-S 326    #23929 non-honors     1:00P-2:15P       MW       BH 319           Prof. César Félix-Brasdefer
    Note:  This class meets with the Honors section for S326 and is taught toward the Honors students.


    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.      

    This course serves as an introduction to the scientific study of the Spanish language. It begins with an examination of how linguistics as a field of study arose and why language is unique to humans, rendering it a cognitive system. This is followed by the study of the sounds of Spanish (phonetics), how they are produced, and the rules that mediate how sounds are combined (phonology). Next is an exploration of the history of the Spanish language, dialectal differences, as well as languages in contact, including Spanish in the United States. The study of word structure in Spanish (morphology), sentence structure and interpretation (syntax), as well as how meaning is derived (semantics and pragmatics) is also examined. The course ends with a brief introduction to second language acquisition. By the end of the course students have the foundation needed to carry out and pursue further linguistic study. Student evaluation is based on active preparation and participation in class discussions, working with linguistic data in and outside of class, unit exams and a final project.

    This class carries COLL (CASE) N & M credit.

    HISP-S 326  #25646     2:30P-3:45P       TR     BH 105    Prof. Laura Gurzynski-Weiss


    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    Introduces the basic concepts of Hispanic linguistics and establishes the background for the future application of linguistic principles.  The course surveys linguistic properties in Spanish, including phonology, morphology, and syntax.  Additional introductory material on historical linguistics, second language acquisition, semantics, and sociolinguistics will be included.  This course carries CASE N&M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 326  #23926    9:05A-9:55A       MWF      BH 333     STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #26246    9:30A-10:45A       TR       BH 314     STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #23927    10:10A-11:00A    MWF      BH 232     STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #26427      11:15A-12:05P     MWF      BH 229     STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #23930      11:15A-12:30P       TR        BH 314      STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #24748        1:00P-2:15P          TR        BH 314      STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #23931        1:25P-2:15P     MWF     BH 232       STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #23932     2:30P-3:45P         TR         BH 332      STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #23933        4:00P-5:15P         TR         BH 333      STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #25250      4:40P-5:30P       MWR     BH 144       STAFF


    HISP-S 328  Introduction to Hispanic Literature  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This course will help you develop tools needed for more advanced study of Hispanic literatures through the reading and analysis of selected literary texts from Spain and Spanish America. One of the key aspects that you will take away from the course is an appreciation of different genres as well as a reflection on the concept of genre itself. In this section of the course, the following three genres will be covered: narrative fiction (short story and novel), poetry, and theater. The course will also highlight the importance of socio-historical context to literary works by presenting texts from different historical periods. In the analyses of the selected texts, the course will introduce you to basic narratological, poetic, dramaturgical, and rhetorical terms used in the study of literature. Evaluation will be based on written homework and short compositions, exams and active participation.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328  #24157       11:15A-12:30P    MW     BH 331    Prof. Catherine Larson


    HISP-S 328  Introduction to Hispanic Literature  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This class is an excellent preparation for upper-level literature and culture courses. It aims to help you develop the skills, tools, and vocabulary necessary to read and analyze literary texts. You will learn in this class how to define and differentiate between the different literary genres, focusing on four major genres: poetry, narrative (short story and novel), drama, and essay. We read a variety of texts from Spain and Spanish America from different historical periods, thus studying the socio-historical context of the work and familiarizing ourselves with the diverse cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. We focus on reading texts closely, asking critical and informed questions of them, and considering their cultural and historical contexts.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328  #23946     11:15A-12:30P    TR    BH 237    Prof. Estela Vieira


    HISP-S 328 Introduction to Hispanic Literature  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

                As an introduction to the literatures of Spain and Spanish America, in this course we will read short stories, a play, a novel and poetry. The course is designed to help students develop tools needed for more advanced study of Hispanic literatures through the reading and analysis of selected literary texts. One of the key aspects that students should take away from the course is an appreciation of different genres as well as a reflection on the concept of genre itself. The course will also highlight the importance of the socio-historical context to literary works by presenting texts from different historical periods.  It will also introduce students to basic narratological, poetic, theatrical and rhetorical terms used in the study of literature; these terms form the bases of the “close reading” of texts. There will be a maximum of 3 short papers, a midterm exam, and a final exam. All work for the course is in Spanish. This course carries the culture studies and arts and humanities distribution.

    TEXTBOOKS:
                Lorca, La casa de Bernarda Alba
                Sender, Requiem por un campesino español
            
    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328   #23949       1:00P-2:15P       MW       BH 246          Prof. Maryellen Bieder


    HISP-S 328  Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)    
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent

    This course is intended as an introduction to Latin American and Spanish literature. Through the study and honing of different critical terms, the course will also serve as an introduction to literary analysis. The development of close reading skills will be coupled with an attention to the historical conditions in which the texts were written and what is at stake in our own interpretations.  While the course will primarily focus on poetry, prose (short stories and a short novel), and theater, we will make brief forays into other genres such as the contemporary crónica in Latin America, microrrelatos, children’s literature, and comics. Students’ grades will be based on brief writing assignments, three short papers, two exams, and several short creative projects.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328   #23943     Honors        4:00P-5:15P   MW   SY 003   Prof. Jonathan Risner
    Note: This class meets with the HISP-S 328 #23944 a non-honors section.

    HISP-S 328     #23944 non-honors     4:00P-5:15P   MW   SY 003  Prof. Jonathan Risner
    HISP-C 492  Readings in Catalan for Graduate Students  (3 credits)
               Variable Title:  Architecture and Urban Space in Modern Catalan Literature            
    This course will study the cultural and social meaning of architecture in Catalonia from the nineteenth century until the present day, focusing especially on the urban development of modern Barcelona. Catalonia’s politics of space constitute a fascinating mixture of splendid architecture (Gaudí is only one example among many others) and nation-building policies that sometimes have expressed and sometimes have repressed the class struggles that traverse Catalonia’s modern history. The course will examine the historical evolution of Catalonia’s politics of space through a variety of Catalan literary texts and other cultural artifacts. Also, the course will include a series of more general texts on urban theory that will allow us to understand the context of Catalonia and Barcelona vis-à-vis Spain, Europe, and globalization.
    HISP-C 492    #26594   9:30A-10:45A     TR   BH 333   Prof. Edgar Illas
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-C 618 Topics in Catalan Literature

    This class meets with the HISP-S 328 #23043 Honors section and will be taught toward the honors students.


    HISP-S 328 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This course will help students develop tools needed for more advanced study of Hispanic literatures through the reading and analysis of selected literary texts from Spain and Spanish America.  One of the key aspects that you should take away from the course is an appreciation of different genres as well as a reflection on the concept of genre itself.  In this section of the course, the following three genres will be covered: narrative fiction, poetry and theater.  The course will also highlight the importance of socio-historical context to literary works by presenting texts from different historical periods.  In the study of the selected texts, the course will introduce you to basic terms of narratological, poetic, dramaturgical and rhetorical terms used in the study of literature, which are the bases of “close reading”.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328     #25520       9:05A-9:55A        MWF       BH 142                STAFF
    HISP-S 328     #23942       9:30A-10:45A        TR          BH 237              STAFF
    HISP-S 328     #23945     10:10A-11:00P       MWF       BH 229              STAFF
    HISP-S 328     #23947     11:15A-12:30P         TR         BH 232              STAFF
    HISP-S 328     #23950     12:20P-1:10P          MWF      BH 333              STAFF
    HISP-S 328     #23948      1:00P-2:15P           TR        BH 237                STAFF
    HISP-S 328     #25310       2:30P-3:45P          TR         BH 336               STAFF


    HISP-S 334  Panoramas of Hispanic Literature  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S328 or equivalent.                                                       

    This panoramic course is intended to help students expand on their knowledge of authors, literary movements and Spanish culture and history more broadly, while developing their skills in literary analysis. The class will focus on representative poetry, prose and dramatic texts from the Middle Ages and Early Modern Period, and the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, exploring how notions of heroism, difference, and gender are represented in Spain across the ages. Class discussion and assignments will be in Spanish.

    This course carries CASE A& H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 334    #23951   (Spain)     9:30A-10:45P      TR      BH 232    STAFF


    HISP-S 334  Panoramas of Hispanic Literature  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S328 or equivalent.

    This section of S334 offers a historical introduction to the literatures of Latin America written in Spanish. The course is structured as a survey spanning several time periods and literary movements, from the texts produced by the conquest and during the colonial period to the experiments and innovations of the first few decades of the 20th century. Students will read, analyze, and discuss a broad selection of texts by canonical authors paying particular attention to their historical and literary context. This course aims to offer students a general overview of the literary history of the region. In doing so, it will also help students further improve their analytical skills as well as their writing and speaking abilities in Spanish.  Class will be conducted entirely in Spanish

    This course carries CASE A& H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 334    #23953   (Latin America)     4:00P-5:15P      TR   BH 016   STAFF    

    top

    Spanish 400-LEVEL

    HISP-S 408 Survey of Spanish Literature 2  (3 credits)                            LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

            This course will consist in a general overview of modern Spanish literature from Romanticism to the Civil War (1936-1939), Franco’s dictatorship (1939-1975) and parliamentary democracy (1975-present). Organized around classic literary movements, the course will analyze the emergence and social impact of these movements in relation to the historical context of modern Spain. At the same time, the course will provide the students with the necessary tools to examine literary texts with rigor and to build their own narrative about the literary periods of modernity. The final grade will be based on class participation, short compositions, class presentation, midterm exam, and research paper.

    This course is taught in Spanish and carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    HISP-S 408    #29890      8:00A-9:15A    TR     BH 333      Prof. Edgar Illas
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498, #30004, Readings for Honors.


    HISP-S 411  SPAIN:  The Cultural Context  (3 credits)                                         CULTURE
    Prerequisite:  Complete one course from S324, S328, S331, S333 or S333

    What images or stereotypes of Spain and its cultures do we have and how do they deviate from reality?  What defines culture and cultural production?  How does the process of learning about a foreign culture take place?  How can we foster the development of cultural learning in Bloomington/our own community?  This course examines our notions of Spain and seeks to build a more complex understanding of contemporary Spanish culture.  In addition, we will explore and analyze the process of cultural awareness.  To accomplish these two goals, traditional classroom learning will be paired with service learning: as S411 students learn about Spanish culture they will, in turn, teach elements of it to Bloomington-area preschoolers.  The teaching component will provide both active and reflective ways to grasp cultural learning.  This course is based on the philosophy that in order to really know something, you must “learn one, do one, teach one.”
      We will study five primary areas of cultural activity, using cultural “texts” that range from literature and newspapers to music and art.  Students will then form small groups that will work together to adapt these cultural materials in order to create age-appropriate lesson plans and vocabulary that they will present in preschools.  This teaching component of the course will be guided by readings on pedagogy and culture as well as in-class workshops.  The experience gained in the preschools will then serve as an “experiential text” for class discussion.  Observational and reflective writing assignments (journals and compositions) about the teaching experience will form the basis for these discussions.
    All class discussion and writing assignments will be in Spanish.  Required readings will be in English and Spanish.

    The Mission of Service Learning in S411
    By combining academic learning with teaching experience, service learning will provide S411 students with a broader and deeper understanding of the course content.  Service learning will sharpen student awareness about cultural processes and foster a sense of civic engagement. Students will have hands-on experience related to how young children learn about culture while providing area pre-schools with valuable expertise. As S411 students and teachers you will learn about Spain’s cultural context while also passing your ideas about culture and language along to area preschoolers.

    ***Attendance is ABSOLUTELY essential for this course.  Our workshops, your group partners, and  community agencies depend on you.  All unexcused absences will have a serious negative impact on your grade.

    HISP-S 411  #18454      9:05A-11:00A     MW    BH 231     Professor  Kathleen Myers
    Note:  This course has a service learning class component.
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498, #30043, Readings for Honors.
    Note:  This course carries COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit and COLL (CASE) GCC,  Global Civilizations and Culture credit.


    HISP-S413 Hispanic Culture in the U.S. (3 credits)                                      CULTURE
    Prerequisite:  Complete one course from S324, S328, S331, S333 or S334

    This course explores the impact of Latina/o culture in the United States. Through the close study of essays, short stories, poems, plays, comics, and other visual material, we will analyze Latina/o cultural production in relation to various socio-political contexts. Some of the topics covered will include popular representations of the “bandido” after the Mexican-American War, Latina/o humor, labor, gender/sexuality, popular music, and immigration, among others. Though some readings may be in English, the course will be conducted in Spanish.

    This course is taught in Spanish and carries CASE A & H and CASE DUS, Diversity in the U.S. distribution credit.

    HISP-S 413    #29896      4:00P-5:15P       TR      BH 229           Prof. R. Andrés Guzmán
    Note:  This course meets with HISP-S 498, #30052, Readings for Honors and LATS – L 400.          


    HISP-S 422  Hispanic Cinema (3 credits)                                                          LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    This course will provide a historical and critical overview of Hispanic cinemas, focusing on Latin American and Spanish film, with brief forays into Latina/o film. The first half of the course will be devoted to honing the terms and components of film analysis (lighting, montage, cinematography etc.), along with a historical panorama of Hispanic cinemas that stretches from silent cinema through the mid-1970s and touches on topics such as cinema of attractions, film and modernity, national film genres, documentary, and Third Cinema. In the second half of the course, we will extend the historical reach up through the present, and focus on select critical concepts and their articulations in Spanish, Latin American, and Latina/o cinemas: spectatorship, star system, auteur theory, ideology, documentary, fiction films and strategies of realism, screen violence, co-productions and transnationalism, cinema and memory, genre cinema and hybridity, queer cinemas, indigenous cinemas, and border cinemas.

    Students’ grades will be based on frequent short writing assignments, a short presentation, two exams, a critical paper, and various collaborative and ‘creative’ exercises using a cellphone as a movie camera. The course will be taught in Spanish.

    This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    HISP-S 422   #29903              2:30P-3:45P    MW    SY 003       Prof. Jonathan Risner
                          Film Showing    6:30P-9:00P    M       WH 007
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498, #30062, Readings for Honors. 


    HISP-S 423  The Craft of Translation (3 credits)                                              LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  S308 or S312 and S328 or S332.

    The Craft of Translation is more a workshop—a “taller”—than a content course. Students will be guided to improve their skills rather than given a quantifiable set of knowledge. During the first ten weeks or so of the semester, students will prepare and submit a short translation from English to Spanish every other week, and one from Spanish to English on the alternate weeks. After this training period, students, with help from the instructor and each other, will prepare a publication portfolio as a final paper. The details of the portfolio will be explained in the syllabus and in class. Grades will be based on participation (which is crucial, given the workshop nature of the course), the weekly translations, and the final portfolio.

    HISP-S 423    #32879      1:00P-2:15P    TR   BH 229     Prof. Josep Sobrer
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498, #32881, Readings for Honors.


    HISP-S 425  Spanish Phonetics  (3 credits)                                              LINGUISTICS
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent.
                                                                
    1. Course description:

    This course is an undergraduate-level introduction to Spanish phonetics and phonology. The main goal of this class is to understand the sound pattern of Spanish as well as to apply this new knowledge in short research projects. Acoustic and articulatory description of Spanish sounds will be presented in class. Basic notions such as the difference between phonetics and phonology, the concepts of phoneme and allophones will be discussed in class while presenting a detailed description of segmental phenomena in the Spanish-speaking world. Furthermore, we will analyze patterns of intonation and become familiar with notions such as pitch accent and boundary tones. The final grade will be based on oral exams, quizzes, written exams, experimental projects, and active participation in class.

    2. Prerequisite:

    S326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

    3. Goals:

    After successful completion of this course, the student will:
    ·         be familiar with all the sounds of Spanish and how they are organized into the phonological system of the language;
    ·         apply the rules of Spanish pronunciation in his/her own speech- at least in controlled contexts- and be able to use the articulatory descriptions in the teaching of Spanish to English speakers;
    ·         understand the principles of Spanish orthography, including rules of accentuation in Spanish;
    ·         use appropriate terminology to express very general notions of phonology and phonetics;
    ·         recognize the dialectal diversity of Spanish in Iberia and the Americas, as well as the phonetics features that characterize the most salient dialects;
    ·         understand basic acoustic analysis and how to use them to describe sounds
    ·         be able to apply basic notions to experimental studies in phonetics;

    4. Program:
    1.  Basic concepts: Phonetics and phonology.
    2.  The syllable.
    3.  The orthography of Spanish: Marking stress.
    4.  Articulatory description of sounds: vowels.
    5.  Articulatory description of sounds: consonants.
    6.   Voiceless stop and affricate phonemes.
    7.   Voiced stops and the palatal affricate/fricative.
    8.   Voiceless fricatives.

    HISP-S 425    #28335        1:00P-2:15P      MW      BH 247     Prof. Manuel Díaz-Campos
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498, #30074, Reading for Honors
    Note:  This class carries CASE N&M distribution credit.


    HISP-S 429  Spanish Sociolinguistics and Pragmatics  (3 credits)                LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title:  Pragmatics: Language use in Context
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent

    The objective of this course is to examine language use in context (pragmatics) and sociolinguistic variation in different varieties of Spanish. The first part of the course covers the foundational concepts of pragmatics: meaning, context, speech acts, reference, politeness/impoliteness, and key notions in discourse analysis. This course will look at grammatical concepts (conditional, subjunctive, negation, preterit/imperfect, word order, etc.) from a pragmatic perspective using data from native and non-native speakers. The second part of the course applies these notions to pragmatic and sociolinguistic variation by examining the effect of social factors (e.g. region, age, social class) on communicative language use. In this course we will analyze natural data in face-to-face interaction and from study abroad contexts in different regions of the Spanish-speaking world.

    This class carries CASE N & M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 429    #29911    11:15A-12:30P   MW      BH 237     Prof. César Félix-Brasdefer
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498, #30083, Readings for Honors.


    HISP-S 430  The Acquisition of Spanish (3 credits)                                         LINGUISTICS
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent.                                                     

    This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of the acquisition of Spanish. Concepts such as interlanguage, error analysis, stages of development, language transfer and language universals will be explored. The course will also trace development from Behaviorist theories to more current approaches such as Cognitivist, Functionalist and Variationist approaches to learner language. The focus of the class will be on learners of Spanish and all application activities will include examples of second language Spanish. Time will be dedicated to the analysis of structures that present challenges to learners from all levels of grammar. Class time will be divided in lectures, discussion, and practical hands-on activities designed to apply theoretical knowledge to practice. Students will be evaluated based on participation, in-class and homework activities, examinations, and a final project.

    This class carries CASE N & M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 430    #25813        11:15A-12:30P      TR     BH 333     Prof. Kimberly Geeslin
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498, #30093, Readings for Honors.


    HISP-S 480 Argentine Literature  (3 credits)                                              LITERATURE
    Prerequisite: S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    This course provides an in-depth exploration of Argentine literature and culture from the early 19th century through the present. We will look at how key literary works in the Argentine tradition respond to (while also trying to intervene in) social conflicts and transformations beginning with the 19th century civil wars up through the brutal military dictatorship of the 1970s and the economic crisis of the end of the millennium. Key events in Southern Cone social history that will be discussed include civil war, nation-building, modernization, genocidal wars against Argentina’s indigenous groups, immigration, populism, socialist revolution, dictatorship and state terrorism, and globalization and privatization. We will also explore how certain Argentine writers have contributed to the evolution of a regional tradition that, rather than adhering strictly to national borders, ascribes to a broader and less clearly defined geographical zone along the Río de la Plata basin. This area includes northern Argentina and Uruguay as well as parts of Paraguay and Brazil, and is defined socially by phenomena including the devastating War of the Triple Alliance (1864-70) as well as by large waves of migration and legal and illegal immigration in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

    Primary texts will include essays, short stories, poems, a play, one or more novels by such authors as Echeverría, Sarmiento, Gorriti, Mansilla, Hernández, Barrett, Quiroga, Borges, Ocampo, Cortázar, Walsh, Piglia, Gambaro, Pizarnik, Kohan and Fogwill. Films may include works directed by Bechis, Bielinsky, Caetano, Carri and Santiago. There will also be short critical and contextual readings.

    Evaluation will be based on class participation, short written assignments, a presentation and a final research project.

    This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    HISP-S 480   #29985      9:30A-10:45A      TR       BH 229       Prof. Patrick Dove
    Note: This class meets with HISP-S 498, #30022, Readings for Honors. 


    HISP-S 494    Individual Readings in Hispanic Studies  (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  Consent of the department.  Permission required, call (812) 855-8612.

    This course is by authorization only.  This course is used only in emergencies pertaining to graduating seniors who are short credit hours for graduation.  This course may be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.  It may not be used as one of the course requirements for the major or minor.

    HISP-S 494      #18455     By Permission Only      Arranged       Professor Ryan Giles


    HISP-S 495  Hispanic Colloquium   (3 credits)                                           LITERATURE
    Variable Title: The Cold War, Revolution and Counter-Revolution in Spanish American and Latino/a Literature
    Prerequisite: S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    Topic:  The Cold War, Revolution, and Counter-Revolution in Spanish American and Latino/a Literature 

    In this course, we will explore the ripple effect of the Cold War and revolutionary politics in Spanish America in works by Spanish American and Latino/a authors.  The Cuban Revolution of 1959 sparked hope of establishing political and cultural autonomy throughout Spanish America. Focusing on literary, political, and historical texts, we will examine the cultural effervescence, including the literary Boom, that sprung out of this moment, the representations of the revolutionary activity that spread throughout the region in subsequent decades, and the attendant critiques of U.S. imperialism; we will also examine the violence and counterrevolutionary measures of the Spanish American states and U.S. Cold War policies alike in their efforts to stem the spread of Communism from the 1950s through the 1970s.  Our discussions examine both the construction of a regional, pan-Spanish American identity during the early Boom years, as well as Latin@ writers’ constructions of themselves as transnational subjects as they insert their narratives into both U.S. and Spanish American history.

    We will read novels, short stories, and poetry, and political texts.  Authors included in the course will include Junot Díaz, Ariel Dorfman, Roberto Fernández Retamar, Carlos Fuentes, Heberto Padilla, Marta Traba, and others.  Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, one presentation, writing assignments, exams, and a final research project.

    This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    HISP-S 495   #29994       2:30P-3:45P       TR       BH 314   Prof. Deborah Cohn
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498, #30032, Readings for Honors.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                              LITERATURE
    Variable Title:  Survey of Spanish Literature 2
    Prerequisite:  S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #30004 meets with HISP-S 408 #29890.  If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #30004  By Permission    8:00A-9:15A   TR     BH 333      Prof. Edgar Illas
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note: This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    The following description is for HISP-S 408  Survey of Spanish Literature 2:

    This course will consist in a general overview of modern Spanish literature from Romanticism to the Civil War (1936-1939), Franco’s dictatorship (1939-1975) and parliamentary democracy (1975-present). Organized around classic literary movements, the course will analyze the emergence and social impact of these movements in relation to the historical context of modern Spain. At the same time, the course will provide the students with the necessary tools to examine literary texts with rigor and to build their own narrative about the literary periods of modernity. The final grade will be based on class participation, short compositions, class presentation, midterm exam, and research paper.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                              CULTURE
    Variable Title: Spain: The Cultural Context
    Prerequisite:  Complete one course from S324, S328, S331, S333 or S333

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #30043 meets with HISP-S 411 #18454.  If you are leaning toward the culture of Spain for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #30043   By Permission    9:05A-11:00A  MW     BH 231     Prof. Kathleen Myers
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note:  This course is taught in Spanish and carries CASE A & H and CASE GCC distribution credit. 

    The following description is for HISP-S 411 Spain:  The Cultural Context:

               What images or stereotypes of Spain and its cultures do we have and how do they deviate from reality?  What defines culture and cultural production?  How does the process of learning about a foreign culture take place?  How can we foster the development of cultural learning in Bloomington/our own community?  This course examines our notions of Spain and seeks to build a more complex understanding of contemporary Spanish culture.  In addition, we will explore and analyze the process of cultural awareness.  To accomplish these two goals, traditional classroom learning will be paired with service learning: as S411 students learn about Spanish culture they will, in turn, teach elements of it to Bloomington-area preschoolers.  The teaching component will provide both active and reflective ways to grasp cultural learning.  This course is based on the philosophy that in order to really know something, you must “learn one, do one, teach one.”
    We will study five primary areas of cultural activity, using cultural “texts” that range from literature and newspapers to music and art.  Students will then form small groups that will work together to adapt these cultural materials in order to create age-appropriate lesson plans and vocabulary that they will present in preschools.  This teaching component of the course will be guided by readings on pedagogy and culture as well as in-class workshops.  The experience gained in the preschools will then serve as an “experiential text” for class discussion.  Observational and reflective writing assignments (journals and compositions) about the teaching experience will form the basis for these discussions.
    All class discussion and writing assignments will be in Spanish.  Required readings will be in English and Spanish.

    The Mission of Service Learning in S411 By combining academic learning with teaching experience, service learning will provide S411 students with a broader and deeper understanding of the course content.  Service learning will sharpen student awareness about cultural processes and foster a sense of civic engagement. Students will have hands-on experience related to how young children learn about culture while providing area pre-schools with valuable expertise. As S411 students and teachers you will learn about Spain’s cultural context while also passing your ideas about culture and language along to area preschoolers.

    ***Attendance is ABSOLUTELY essential for this course.  Our workshops, your group partners, and  community agencies depend on you.  All unexcused absences will have a serious negative impact on your grade.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                              CULTURE
    Variable Title:  Hispanic Culture in the U.S.
    Prerequisite:  Complete one course from S324, S328, S331, S333 or S333

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #30052 meets with HISP-S 413 #29896.  If you are leaning toward Hispanic Culture in the U.S. for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #30052   By Permission    4:00P-5:15P  TR    BH 229      Prof. R. Andrés Guzmán
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note:  This course carries CASE A & H and CASE DUS, Diversity in the U.S. distribution credit.

    The following description is for HISP-S 413 Hispanic Culture in the U.S.:

    This course explores the impact of Latina/o culture in the United States. Through the close study of essays, short stories, poems, plays, comics, and other visual material, we will analyze Latina/o cultural production in relation to various socio-political contexts. Some of the topics covered will include popular representations of the “bandido” after the Mexican-American War, Latina/o humor, labor, gender/sexuality, popular music, and immigration, among others. Though some readings may be in English, the course will be conducted in Spanish.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                              LITERATURE
    Variable Title: Hispanic Cinema
    Prerequisite:  S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #30062 meets with HISP-S 422 #29903.  If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #30062   By Permission    2:30P-3:45P   MW     SY 003     Prof. Jonathan Risner
                                           Film Showing     6:30P-9:00P   M         WH 007 
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note:  This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    The following description is for HISP-S 422 Hispanic Cinema:

    This course will provide a historical and critical overview of Hispanic cinemas, focusing on Latin American and Spanish film, with brief forays into Latina/o film. The first half of the course will be devoted to honing the terms and components of film analysis (lighting, montage, cinematography etc.), along with a historical panorama of Hispanic cinemas that stretches from, silent cinema through the mid-1970s and touches on topics such as cinema of attractions, film and modernity, national film genres, documentary, and Third Cinema. In the second half of the course, we will extend the historical reach up through the present and focus on select critical concepts and their articulations in Spanish, Latin American, and Latina/o cinemas: spectatorship, star system, auteur theory, ideology, documentary, fiction films and strategies of realism, screen violence, co-productions and transnationalism, cinema and memory, genre cinema and hybridity, queer cinemas, indigenous cinemas, and border cinemas.

    Students’ grades will be based on frequent short writing assignments, a short presentation, two exams, a critical paper, and various collaborative and ‘creative’ exercises using a cellphone as a movie camera. The course will be taught in Spanish.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors  (3 credits)                                             LITERATURE
    Variable Title: The Craft of Translation
    Prerequisite:  Prerequisite:  S308 or S312 and S328 or S332.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #32881 meets with HISP-S 423 #32879.   If you are leaning toward Literature and translation for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498   #32881     1:00P-2:15P   TR    BH 229     Prof. Josep Sobrer

    The following description is for HISP-S 423 The Craft of Translation:

    The Craft of Translation is more a workshop—a “taller”—than a content course. Students will be guided to improve their skills rather than given a quantifiable set of knowledge. During the first ten weeks or so of the semester, students will prepare and submit a short translation from English to Spanish every other week, and one from Spanish to English on the alternate weeks. After this training period, students, with help from the instructor and each other, will prepare a publication portfolio as a final paper. The details of the portfolio will be explained in the syllabus and in class. Grades will be based on participation (which is crucial, given the workshop nature of the course), the weekly translations, and the final portfolio.

    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                                  LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title: Spanish Phonetics
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #30074 meets with HISP-S 425 #28335.  If you are leaning toward Linguistics for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498   #30074   By Permission      1:00P-2:15P   MW    BH 247          Prof. Manuel Díaz-Campos
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note:  This class carries CASE N&M distribution credit.

    Description for HISP-S 425 Spanish Phonetics follows:

    1. Course description:

    This course is an undergraduate-level introduction to Spanish phonetics and phonology. The main goal of this class is to understand the sound pattern of Spanish as well as to apply this new knowledge in short research projects. Acoustic and articulatory description of Spanish sounds will be presented in class. Basic notions such as the difference between phonetics and phonology, the concepts of phoneme and allophones will be discussed in class while presenting a detailed description of segmental phenomena in the Spanish-speaking world. Furthermore, we will analyze patterns of intonation and become familiar with notions such as pitch accent and boundary tones. The final grade will be based on oral exams, quizzes, written exams, experimental projects, and active participation in class.

    2. Prerequisite:

    S326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

    3. Goals:

    After successful completion of this course, the student will:
    ·         be familiar with all the sounds of Spanish and how they are organized into the phonological system of the language;
    ·         apply the rules of Spanish pronunciation in his/her own speech- at least in controlled contexts- and be able to use the articulatory descriptions in the teaching of Spanish to English speakers;
    ·         understand the principles of Spanish orthography, including rules of accentuation in Spanish;
    ·         use appropriate terminology to express very general notions of phonology and phonetics;
    ·         recognize the dialectal diversity of Spanish in Iberia and the Americas, as well as the phonetics features that characterize the most salient dialects;
    ·         understand basic acoustic analysis and how to use them to describe sounds
    ·         be able to apply basic notions to experimental studies in phonetics;

    4. Program:
    1.  Basic concepts: Phonetics and phonology.
    2.  The syllable.
    3.  The orthography of Spanish: Marking stress.
    4.  Articulatory description of sounds: vowels.
    5.  Articulatory description of sounds: consonants.
    6.   Voiceless stop and affricate phonemes.
    7.   Voiced stops and the palatal affricate/fricative.
    8.   Voiceless fricatives.

    _____________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                                  LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title: Pragmatics:  Language use in Context
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #30083 meets with HISP-S 429 #29911.  If you are leaning toward Linguistics for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498   #30083   By Permission     11:15A-12:30P   MW       BH 237      Prof. César Félix-Brasdefer
    Note: Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu
    Note:  This class carries CASE N & M distribution credit.

    Description for HISP-S 429 Pragmatics: Language in Context:

    The objective of this course is to examine language use in context (pragmatics) and sociolinguistic variation in different varieties of Spanish. The first part of the course covers the foundational concepts of pragmatics: meaning, context, speech acts, reference, politeness/impoliteness, and key notions in discourse analysis. This course will look at grammatical concepts (conditional, subjunctive, negation, preterit/imperfect, word order, etc.) from a pragmatic perspective using data from native and non-native speakers. The second part of the course applies these notions to pragmatic and sociolinguistic variation by examining the effect of social factors (e.g. region, age, social class) on communicative language use. In this course we will analyze natural data in face-to-face interaction and from study abroad contexts in different regions of the Spanish-speaking world.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                                  LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title: The Acquisition of Spanish
    Prerequisite:  S326 or equivalent.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #30093 meets with HISP-S 430 #25813.  If you are leaning toward Linguistics for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498   #30093   By Permission    11:15A-12:30P   TR     BH 333          Prof. Kimberly Geeslin
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note:  This class carries CASE N&M distribution credit.

    Description for HISP-S 430 The Acquisition of Spanish follows:                                        

    This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of the acquisition of Spanish. Concepts such as interlanguage, error analysis, stages of development, language transfer and language universals will be explored. The course will also trace development from Behaviorist theories to more current approaches such as Cognitivist, Functionalist and Variationist approaches to learner language. The focus of the class will be on learners of Spanish and all application activities will include examples of second language Spanish. Time will be dedicated to the analysis of structures that present challenges to learners from all levels of grammar. Class time will be divided in lectures, discussion, and practical hands-on activities designed to apply theoretical knowledge to practice. Students will be evaluated based on participation, in-class and homework activities, examinations, and a final project.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                              LITERATURE
    Variable Title: Argentine Literature
    Prerequisite:  S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #30022 meets with HISP-S 480 #29985.  If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

    HISP-S 498     #30022   By Permission  9:30A-10:45A  TR   BH 229     Prof. Patrick Dove
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note: This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    The following description is for HISP-S 420 Argentine Literature:

    This course provides an in-depth exploration of Argentine literature and culture from the early 19th century through the present. We will look at how key literary works in the Argentine tradition respond to (while also trying to intervene in) social conflicts and transformations beginning with the 19th century civil wars up through the brutal military dictatorship of the 1970s and the economic crisis of the end of the millennium. Key events in Southern Cone social history that will be discussed include civil war, nation-building, modernization, genocidal wars against Argentina’s indigenous groups, immigration, populism, socialist revolution, dictatorship and state terrorism, and globalization and privatization. We will also explore how certain Argentine writers have contributed to the evolution of a regional tradition that, rather than adhering strictly to national borders, ascribes to a broader and less clearly defined geographical zone along the Río de la Plata basin. This area includes northern Argentina and Uruguay as well as parts of Paraguay and Brazil, and is defined socially by phenomena including the devastating War of the Triple Alliance (1864-70) as well as by large waves of migration and legal and illegal immigration in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

    Primary texts will include essays, short stories, poems, a play, one or more novels by such authors as Echeverría, Sarmiento, Gorriti, Mansilla, Hernández, Barrett, Quiroga, Borges, Ocampo, Cortázar, Walsh, Piglia, Gambaro, Pizarnik, Kohan and Fogwill. Films may include works directed by Bechis, Bielinsky, Caetano, Carri and Santiago. There will also be short critical and contextual readings.

    Evaluation will be based on class participation, short written assignments, a presentation and a final research project.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                              LITERATURE
    Variable Title: The Cold War, Revolution and Counter-Revolution in Spanish American and Latino/a Literature
    Prerequisite:  S328; S324 or S326; and one additional 300-level Spanish class.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish.  This HISP-S 498, #30032 meets with HISP-S 495 #29994.  If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.


    HISP-S 498     #30032   By Permission    2:30P-3:45P    TR    BH 314     Prof. Deborah Cohn
    Note:  Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.
    Note:  This course carries CASE A & H distribution credit.

    The following description is for HISP-S 495 Hispanic Colloquium, Variable Title: Literature and the Cold War in Latin America:

    Topic:  The Cold War, Revolution, and Counter-Revolution in Spanish American and Latino/a Literature 

    In this course, we will explore the ripple effect of the Cold War and revolutionary politics in Spanish America in works by Spanish American and Latino/a authors.  The Cuban Revolution of 1959 sparked hope of establishing political and cultural autonomy throughout Spanish America. Focusing on literary, political, and historical texts, we will examine the cultural effervescence, including the literary Boom, that sprung out of this moment, the representations of the revolutionary activity that spread throughout the region in subsequent decades, and the attendant critiques of U.S. imperialism; we will also examine the violence and counterrevolutionary measures of the Spanish American states and U.S. Cold War policies alike in their efforts to stem the spread of Communism from the 1950s through the 1970s.  Our discussions examine both the construction of a regional, pan-Spanish American identity during the early Boom years, as well as Latin@ writers’ constructions of themselves as transnational subjects as they insert their narratives into both U.S. and Spanish American history.  We will read novels, short stories, and poetry, and political texts.  Authors included in the course will include Junot Díaz, Ariel Dorfman, Roberto Fernández Retamar, Carlos Fuentes, Heberto Padilla, Marta Traba, and others.  Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, one presentation, writing assignments, exams, and a final research project.


    HISP-S 499 Honors Research in Spanish  ( 1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  Approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.   
    BY PERMISSION ONLY.  Call (812) 855-8612

    Majors doing honors in Spanish would register for this class after they have completed S498 and while they are writing their honors thesis.  Contact Karla Allgood via email at kallgood@indiana.edu or see in person in BH 844 for permission arrangements.

    HISP-S 499  #18458      By Permission Only    Arranged          Professor Ryan Giles 

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