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Undergraduate Studies

Undergraduate Course Descriptions: Spring 2015

Catalan
Portuguese
Spanish 100 AND 200-LEVEL
Spanish 300-LEVEL
Spanish 400-LEVEL

  • Courses, times, days, rooms, and/or instructors are subject to change.
  • Please review the entire course description. Multiple descriptions may be listed for courses with multiple sections.

  • CATALAN

    HISP-C 450  Catalan Literature  (3 credits)
    TOPIC: Modern Catalan Literature
    Prerequisite:  HISP-C 105 or consent of the Instructor

       Modern Catalan literature constitutes an extraordinary cultural event that, for multiple reasons, has remained marginal amidst the great European literary traditions. Catalan literature and language have played a central role in the political re-emergence of Catalonia as “a nation without a state.” Given these historical conditions, the Catalan literary tradition is a particularly productive space to explore the always-puzzling relations between literature and politics.
        The course will survey the panorama of Catalan literature from the nineteenth century to the present. Readings will exemplify all important periods (Renaixença, modernisme, noucentisme, avantguarda, postguerra, postmodernitat) and will include novels, short stories, poetry and plays. We will focus on a good number of female writers. Catalan women writers are especially significant, not only because of their literary value, but perhaps also because, as poet Maria Mercè Marçal put it, they often write subjugated in three main ways: as women, as writers in a minority language, and as members of the working classes.
         The course will be taught in Catalan. Students who have not taken Catalan should seek the consent of the instructor. This course can fulfill the elective 300/400 level requirement for the Spanish major.

    HISP-C 450  #30129    11:15A - 12:30P    TR   BH 236   Prof. Edgar Illas

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-C 492, HISP-C 494 and HISP-C 550.


    HISP-C 494  Individual Readings in Catalan Studies  (3 credits)
    TOPIC: Modern Catalan Literature
    Prerequisite:  HISP-C 105 or consent of the Instructor

         Modern Catalan literature constitutes an extraordinary cultural event that, for multiple reasons, has remained marginal amidst the great European literary traditions. Catalan literature and language have played a central role in the political re-emergence of Catalonia as “a nation without a state.” Given these historical conditions, the Catalan literary tradition is a particularly productive space to explore the always-puzzling relations between literature and politics.
        The course will survey the panorama of Catalan literature from the nineteenth century to the present. Readings will exemplify all important periods (Renaixença, modernisme, noucentisme, avantguarda, postguerra, postmodernitat) and will include novels, short stories, poetry and plays. We will focus on a good number of female writers. Catalan women writers are especially significant, not only because of their literary value, but perhaps also because, as poet Maria Mercè Marçal put it, they often write subjugated in three main ways: as women, as writers in a minority language, and as members of the working classes.
         The course will be taught in Catalan. Students who have not taken Catalan should seek the consent of the instructor.  This course can fulfill the elective 300/400 level requirement for the Spanish major.

    HISP-C 494    #23310  11:15A - 12:30P    TR   BH 236   Prof. Edgar Illas

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-C 450, HISP-C 492 and HISP-C 550.

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    PORTUGUESE

    HISP-P 135 Intensive Portuguese (4 credits) 
    For students from secondary school placed into the second semester of first‑year study or those with a strong background in Spanish or another Romance Language. Content of P100 and P150 covered at an accelerated pace.  Credit not given for both P135 and P150. This course can count for the Spanish major 300/400 level elective.

    HISP-P 135  #18164   9:05A - 9:55A   MTWR    WH 104    STAFF 

    Note: This class meets with HISP-P 491.


    HISP-P 150 Elementary Portuguese II (4 credits) 
    Prerequisite: P100 or equivalent

    Introduction to present‑day Portuguese, with an interactive, communicative focus and structured drills for mastery of phonology, basic structural patterns, and functional vocabulary. To be taken in sequence after P100, Elementary Portuguese I. Attendance in language laboratory may be required.

    HISP-P 150  #18165   10:10A - 11:00A    MTWR    BH 142    STAFF


    HISP-P 250 Second‑Year Portuguese II (3 credits) 
    Prerequisite: P200 or equivalent. 

    Second semester of second‑year Portuguese, with increased emphasis on communicative exercises and selected readings. Attendance in the language laboratory may be required.                      

    HISP-P 250   #23311    10:10A - 11:00A    MWF    BH 331   STAFF
    HISP-P 250   #26914    10:10A - 11:00A    MWF    BH 314   STAFF      


    HISP-P 311 Advanced Grammar and Composition in Portuguese   (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: P200-P250 or equivalent

    An advanced course on Portuguese composition and grammar, designed to refine students’ knowledge of several language skills.  Emphasis on writing, with special attention to syntax and vocabulary development and usage.  Students will write compositions, increasing in length and complexity as the semester progresses. This course is recommended as a continuation of P200-P250.

    HISP-P 311    #30137    11:15A - 12:05P   MWF   BH 322    STAFF

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-P 492.


    HISP-P 401  Literatures of the Portuguese Speaking World II  (3 credits)        

    This is the second part of a two-semester survey of the literatures of Portugal, Brazil, and Portuguese-speaking Africa from the late 19th century to present day. This course is cross-cultural and comparative in nature focusing on how diverse authors—all writing in Portuguese—but from different geographic regions responded to the historical and social challenges of their times. We will read a variety of genres (prose, poetry, theater) and cover the major literary movements from realism, modernism, to social realism and contemporary feminist and post-modernist writing. The course is taught in Portuguese, and students are not required to have taken the first part of the survey.

    HISP-P 401   #30144    2:30P - 3:45P  MW   BH 233  Prof. Estela Vieira

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-P 498 and HISP-P 501.


    HISP-P 494  Readings in Luso-Brazilian Literature (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  Consent of the Department.

    May be repeated for a maximum of up to 6 credit hours as long as each registration covers a different topic.

    HISP-P 494  #18167    ARRANGED            ARRANGED   Prof. Estela Vieira


    HISP-P 498  Portuguese Honors Seminar  (3 credits)
    Variable Title:  Literatures of the Portuguese Speaking World II
    Prerequisite:  By permission only. Call (812) 855-8612 or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu

    This is the second part of a two-semester survey of the literatures of Portugal, Brazil, and Portuguese-speaking Africa from the late 19th century to present day. This course is cross-cultural and comparative in nature focusing on how diverse authors—all writing in Portuguese—but from different geographic regions responded to the historical and social challenges of their times. We will read a variety of genres (prose, poetry, theater) and cover the major literary movements from realism, modernism, to social realism and contemporary feminist and post-modernist writing. The course is taught in Portuguese, and students are not required to have taken the first part of the survey.

    HISP-P 498   #18168    2:30P - 3:45P    MW   BH 233  Prof. Estela Vieira

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-P 401 and HISP-P 501.


    HISP-P 499  Honors Research in Portuguese  (1 – 3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-P 498
    By Permission Only:  Call (812) 855-8612 or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu

    Approval of the Director of Portuguese Studies.

    HISP-P 499   #18169     ARRANGED            ARRANGED     Prof. Estela Vieira

    Note:  This class open to Portuguese Honors students only.

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    Spanish 100 & 200-LEVEL

    HISP-S 100 Elementary Spanish  (4 credits)  
    By permission only. Call (812) 855-8612 or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu

    The course presents a four‑skills approach to Spanish with an emphasis on critical thinking skills. Students will practice speaking in small groups in class as well as reading and discussing materials in Spanish. Grading is based on exams, homework, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Enrollment in S100 is restricted to those with less than 2 years of high school Spanish or with the consent of the department. All others must enroll in S105. The next course in the sequence for HISP-S 100 students would be HISP-S 150 Elementary Spanish II.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2015 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S. 


    HISP-S 105  First Year Spanish (4 credits)

    This introductory course is for students with 2 or more years of high-school study and covers the essential grammar and vocabulary of first-year Spanish. This course presents a four-skills approach to Spanish with an emphasis on critical thinking skills.  Students will practice speaking in small groups in class as well as reading and discussing materials in Spanish.  Grading is based on exams, homework, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Homework load is substantial. Credit not given for both HISP-S 105 and HISP-S 100 or HISP-S 105 and HISP-S 150.The next course in this sequence is HISP-S 200 Second-Year Spanish I. 

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2015 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 150 Elementary Spanish II (4 credits)  
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 100

    This course continues the work of S100 with continued emphasis on all four skills and on critical thinking skills. Students will practice speaking in small groups in class, as well as reading and discussing materials in Spanish. Grading is based on exams, homework, compositions, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. The next course in this sequence is HISP-S 200 Second-Year Spanish I.

    Note: HISP-S 150 is for those students who took HISP-S 100 Elementary Spanish here at IUB or took an equivalent course at a regional campus or other university.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2015 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 200 Second‑Year Spanish I    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 105 or HISP-S 150 or equivalent. 

    This course reviews some of the basic structures studied in the first year, and examines them in greater detail. Emphasis remains on the four skills and on critical thinking skills. Cultural readings and a mystery story are also included. Grades are based on exams, homework, compositions, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Homework load is substantial. The next course in this sequence is HISP-S 250 Second-Year Spanish II.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2015 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 250 Second‑Year Spanish II  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 200 or equivalent. 

    This course continues the work of HISP-S 200 with a continued emphasis on the four skills and on critical thinking skills.  Short literary readings are also included. Grades are based on exams, homework, compositions, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Homework load is substantial. After successful completion of this course, the foreign language requirement is fulfilled for schools that require a 4th -semester proficiency. For those students who wish to go on for a minor or major in Spanish, the next course to take would be HISP-S 280 Spanish Grammar in Context.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2015 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 280  Spanish Grammar in Context (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: S250 or equivalent.

    The overall goal of this course is to provide students with the language skills necessary to pursue upper division course work in Spanish. The main focus is on the development of formal linguistic skills through explicit grammar instruction and review, vocabulary building exercises, reading original texts by contemporary authors, and exploring the link between literature and culture through writing and conversation.
    The main objective of S280 is to strengthen students’ comprehension and application of the most challenging grammatical structures for second language learners within a meaningful language context. This objective will be accomplished with a thorough review and practice of problematic grammatical structures, the analysis of these and other structures in the context provided by a series of literary readings and selections from an audio book, and the application of these structures in writing and discussion sessions. The course will be conducted in Spanish.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2015 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.

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    Spanish 300-LEVEL

    HISP-S 308  Composition and Conversation in Spanish (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent

    The objective of this course is to develop students’ oral and writing abilities in Spanish.  Students will develop writing skill in Spanish by learning and practicing the main components of different writing styles: description, narration, exposition, and argumentation. Students will learn compositional elements that provide cohesion and coherence in both formal and informal writing styles. Students will develop their oral skills by watching and discussing a number of critically acclaimed films from different Spanish-speaking countries which deal with a variety of cultural, social, and political issues. To achieve the goal of improving oral proficiency, students will participate in various in-class discussions and debates on controversial topics presented in the films. By the end of this course, students will be able to write in a variety of formal and informal writing styles and to discuss a wide range of topics.

    To see active sections available for spring 2015 go to schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, chose spring 2015.  We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 315 Spanish in the Business World  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent

    El objetivo de este curso es promocionar el entendimiento cultural internacional en el mundo de los negocios por medio del estudio del lenguaje comercial y del conocimiento de sus códigos y costumbres. Este objetivo se persigue de dos formas. Por un lado, se aspira a familiarizar al estudiante con el lenguaje comercial escrito y hablado y se trabajará con documentos variados -- cartas comerciales, descripciones de trabajo, anuncios, formularios bancarios y de importación y exportación, etc. --. Además, los estudiantes aprenderán a leer, escribir y traducir documentos comerciales y practicarán conversaciones sobre diversas situaciones de negocios. Por otro lado, se introducirá al estudiante en el conocimiento de las costumbres, protocolo y prácticas culturales propias del mundo comercial hispano. Por medio de casos prácticos se analizarán estereotipos culturales y se cuestionarán comportamientos y conductas éticas del comercio internacional. En definitiva, se buscará sensibilizar al estudiante a conocer, entender, respetar o criticar prácticas culturales del mundo de negocios hispano. Este curso se dictará únicamente en español. El prerrequisito de este curso es S280.

    HISP-S 315  #24557     9:05A-9:55A    MWF   BH 214     STAFF


    HISP-S 317 Spanish Conversation & Diction  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent

    This class meets five times a week. It includes contrastive study of Spanish and English pronunciation.  Intensive controlled conversation correlated with readings, reports, debates, and group discussions.  S317 may be repeated once for credit.  S317 is NOT open to native speakers of Spanish.
    HISP-S 317  #18244     9:05A-9:55A      Daily (MTWRF)    SY 105      STAFF
    HISP-S 317  #21835    11:15A-12:05P    Daily (MTWRF)    SY 105      STAFF


    HISP-S 324 Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Cultures (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent

    This course critically examines a variety of Hispanic cultural contexts, with special attention devoted to the Hispanic Caribbean, Spain, Argentina, Mexico and the Andean nations.  The study sequence follows three primary topical units:  Race & Mestizaje, Gender & Sexuality and Memory & Post-Dictatorship.  Focusing on a variety of texts (visual, literary, documentary, historiographical) from different historical periods (1600’s to the present), the course explores the historical and cultural traits which are unique to the regions studied as well as the many elements they share in common.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    To see active sections available for spring 2015 go to schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, chose spring 2015.  We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent.

    This course is an introduction to the study of Hispanic Linguistics and provides students with a foundation in the main areas of linguistic analysis. It begins by exploring the goals of Linguistics as a scientific field of study and by examining the features of natural languages. After this general overview the course focuses on the description of the sounds of Spanish and their organization (phonetics and phonology), the structure of words and the different processes of word formation (morphology), the combination of words in larger units of sentence structure (syntax), and the study of word and sentence meaning in its interaction with context (semantics and pragmatics). These areas of study will be explored using data from different varieties of Spanish. The course ends with an overview of the history of Spanish. Student evaluation is based on class participation, weekly homework assignments, midterm and final exams, and an oral presentation.

    This class carries COLL (CASE) N & M credit.

    HISP-S 326  #25533   11:15A-12:30P   TR    BH 331   Prof. Patricia Matos Amaral


    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent.

    This course examines the basic linguistic structure of Spanish based on the principal fields of linguistic studies.  The course begins with an overview of the characteristics of human language.  Course topics include the structure and order of words (syntax), the forms and structure of words (morphology), the sounds of Spanish (phonetics and phonology) and how they compare with English, and how Spanish varies across regions, and by social considerations.
    Class time is primarily lecture based, but also includes linguistic exercises, analysis, and discussion.  Course activities include self-analysis of Spanish abilities and comparison with native speakers (the goal being to improve the student’s language abilities by contrastive analysis of linguistic structure).  Evaluation is based on participation, homework assignments, projects, exams and presentations. 

    This class carries COLL (CASE) N & M credit.

    HISP-S 326   #23351      2:30P-3:45P   TR    BH 236     Prof. Erik Willis


    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent.

    1. Course description:

    This course is an introduction to basic concepts and methodology used in Spanish Linguistics. The main goal of the course is to provide students with the opportunity to learn the tools of linguistic analysis and to apply them to the study of Spanish. Attention will be given to different levels of analysis in linguistics including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and language variation. Class time will be divided between lecture, problem-solving exercises, and discussion. Evaluation will be based on exams, class participation, homework, experiments, and other assignments.

    2. Prerequisite:  S280, S310 or equivalent.

    3. Goals:
    After successful completion of this course, the student will:

    4. Topics:
    1.Introduction to linguistics
    2.Phonetics and phonology
    3.Morpho-syntax
    4.Semantics
    5.Regional variation
    6.Bilingualism in USA

    This course carries CASE N&M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 326   #23349     1:00P-2:15P    TR    BH 236  Prof. Manuel Díaz-Campos
    NOTE:  This class is for Hutton Honors Students only.


    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent.

    This course serves as an introduction to the scientific study of the Spanish language. It begins with an examination of how linguistics as a field of study arose and why language is unique to humans, rendering it a cognitive system. The second unit examines how Spanish is acquired both as a native language and as an additional language. This is followed by the study of the sounds of Spanish (phonetics), how they are produced, and the rules that mediate how sounds are combined (phonology). Next is an exploration of the history of the Spanish language and current use of Spanish in context, including dialectal differences, languages in contact, and Spanish in the United States. The study of word structure in Spanish (morphology), sentence structure and interpretation (syntax), as well as how meaning is derived (semantics and pragmatics) is also examined. Student evaluation is based on active preparation and participation in class discussions, working with linguistic data in and outside of class, unit exams and a final project. By the end of the course students have the foundation needed to carry out basic data analysis of Spanish and pursue further linguistic study.

    This course carries CASE N&M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 326  #24097     1:00P-2:15P    MW    BH 345   Prof. Laura Gurzynski-Weiss


    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent.

    Introduces the basic concepts of Hispanic linguistics and establishes the background for the future application of linguistic principles. The course surveys linguistic properties in Spanish, including phonology, morphology, and syntax. Additional introductory material on historical linguistics, second language acquisition, semantics, and sociolinguistics will be included. 

    This course carries CASE N&M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 326 #25373        9:30A-10:45A      TR       BH 232       STAFF
    HISP-S 326 #23348       10:10A-11:00A    MWF     BH 140       STAFF
    HISP-S 326 #23352        1:25P-2:15P        MWF    WH 119      STAFF
    HISP-S 326 #32892       1:25P-2:15P         MWF     BH 139      STAFF
    HISP-S 326 #24883        2:30P-3:45P          TR      BH 237      STAFF
    HISP-S 326 #23353        2:30P-3:45P          TR      BH 232      STAFF
    HISP-S 326 #23354        4:00P-5:15P          TR     AC C101     STAFF
    HISP-S 326 #24558        4:40P-5:30P        MWR    SY 137       STAFF


    HISP-S 328 Introduction to Hispanic Literature  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent.

    This course provides critical tools and methods needed for the advanced study of Hispanic literatures through close readings of selected literary works from Spain and Spanish America. We will explore literary techniques relating to three distinct genres—prose, poetry and theater—and will familiar ourselves with the fundamental conceptual vocabulary of contemporary literary criticism. The course will also emphasize the importance of socio-historical context for literary analysis, insofar as literary works are influenced by the historical moment or time in which they are written or because, in some cases, writers turn to literature in an effort to transcend the limits of the time and place in which they write. Readings include works by Cervantes, Quevedo, Góngora, Garcilaso, Sor Juana, Bécquer, Darío, Martí, Agustini, Paz, Vallejo, Usigli, Quiroga, Bombal, Borges, Cortázar, Donoso, Rulfo, Fuentes, Bolaño and others.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328  #23363    9:30A-10:45A    TR    BH 229  Prof. Patrick Dove
    HISP-S 328   #23368  11:15A-12:30P    TR    BH 237  Prof. Patrick Dove


    HISP-S 328 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent.

    This course will help you develop the tools needed for more advanced study of Hispanic literature through the reading and analysis of selected literary texts from Spain and Spanish America. One of the key aspects that you will take away from the course is an appreciation of different genres as well as a reflection on the concept of genre itself. In this section of the course, the following three genres will be covered: narrative fiction (short story and novel), poetry, and theater. The course will also highlight the importance of socio-historical context to literary works by presenting texts from different historical periods. In the analyses of the selected texts, the course will introduce you to basic terms used in the study of literature. Evaluation will be based on written homework and short compositions, exams and active participation.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328   #23552     11:15A-12:30P   MW  BH 221   Prof. Catherine Larson


    HISP-S 328 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent.

    This course will help students to develop tools needed for more advanced study of Hispanic literatures through the reading and analysis of selected literary texts from Spain and Spanish America.  One of the key aspects that you should take away from the course is an appreciation of different genres as well as a reflection on the concept of genre itself.  In this section of the course, the following three genres will be covered: narrative fiction, poetry and theater.  The course will also highlight the importance of socio-historical context to literary works by presenting texts from different historical periods.  In the study of the selected texts, the course will introduce you to basic terms of narratological, poetic, dramaturgical and rhetorical terms used in the study of literature, which are the bases of “close reading”.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328   #23364    HONORS     11:15A-12:30P   TR  BH 314   Prof. Reyes Vila-Belda

    Note:  This class is open to Hutton Honors students only.


    HISP-S 328 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent. 

    This course is intended as an introduction to Latin American and Spanish literature. Through the study and honing of different critical terms, the course will also serve as an introduction to literary analysis. The development of close reading skills will be coupled with an attention to the historical conditions in which the texts were written and what is at stake in our own interpretations.  While the course will primarily focus on poetry, prose (short stories and a short novel), and theater, we will make brief forays into other genres such as the contemporary crónica in Latin America, microrrelatos, children’s literature, and comics. Students’ grades will be based on brief writing assignments, three short papers, two exams, and several short creative projects.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328   #23369      1:00P-2:15P     TR   BH 214   Prof. Jonathan Risner


    HISP-S 328 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent.

    This course provides students with an introduction to the analysis of Hispanic literature and culture. As an introductory course, its main objectives are to provide students with a survey of Hispanic literary and cultural production and to foster basic concepts and skills through which to interpret, analyze, and communicate (both orally and in writing) about literature and culture. While our main focus will be on essays, narrative, poetry, and drama, we may also expand our archive to include some films. Through in-class discussions and written work (textual analyses and argumentative essays) we will learn to develop grounded interpretations of literary and cultural texts by analyzing their content (story, ideas, themes), the ways through which content is structured and expressed by the text’s form, and the relationship between a text and its socio-political context. The course’s approach stems from the proposition that by better understanding the way a text creates meaning and engages with the ideas, changes, and preoccupations of its time, we will also be able to become more critical readers/viewers. The analytical tools that students learn in this course will also prepare them for more advanced classes in literature and culture. 

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328   #24597       4:00P-5:15P    TR    BH 236   Prof. Ricardo Andrés Guzmán


    HISP-S 328  Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; One additional 300-level Spanish course.

    This course will help students develop tools needed for more advanced study of Hispanic literatures through the reading and analysis of selected literary texts from Spain and Spanish America. One of the key aspects that you should take away from the course is an appreciation of different genres as well as a reflection on the concept of genre itself.  In this section of the course, the following three genres will be covered: narrative fiction, poetry and theater. The course will also highlight the importance of socio-historical context to literary works by presenting texts from different historical periods.  In the study of the selected texts, the course will introduce you to basic terms of narratological, poetic, dramaturgical and rhetorical terms used in the study of literature, which are the bases of “close reading”.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328   #24773     9:05A-9:55A      MWF    BH 134       STAFF
    HISP-S 328   #23370    9:30A-10:45A      MW     BH 105       STAFF
    HISP-S 328   #23371   12:20P-1:10P       MWF   SY 0006      STAFF
    HISP-S 328   #24607    2:30P-3:45P        TR       BH 335       STAFF
    HISP-S 328   #23367    4:00P-5:15P        TR       BH 140       STAFF 


    HISP-S 334 Panoramas of Hispanic Literature  (3 credits)  (SPAIN LITERATURE)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328 or equivalent.

    This panoramic course is intended to help students expand on their knowledge of authors, literary movements and Spanish culture and history more broadly, while developing their skills in literary analysis. The class will focus on representative poetry, prose and dramatic texts from the Middle Ages and Early Modern Period, and the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, exploring how notions of heroism, difference, and gender are represented in Spain across the ages. Class discussion and assignments will be in Spanish.

    This class carries the COLL (CASE) A & H Breadth of Inquiry and (CASE) GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 334   #23372       11:15A-12:30P     TR    BH 232     Prof. Ryan Giles


    HISP-S 334 Panoramas of Hispanic Literature  (3 credits)  (LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328 or equivalent.

    This section of S334 offers a historical introduction to the literatures of Latin America written in Spanish. The course is structured as a survey spanning several time periods and literary movements, from the texts produced by the conquest and during the colonial period to the experiments and innovations of the first few decades of the 20th century. Students will read, analyze, and discuss a broad selection of texts by canonical authors paying particular attention to their historical and literary context. This course aims to offer students a general overview of the literary history of the region. In doing so, it will also help students further improve their analytical skills as well as their writing and speaking abilities in Spanish.  Class will be conducted entirely in Spanish.

    This course carries (CASE) A& H and (CASE) GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 334    #23373      4:00P-5:15P    TR     WH 119       STAFF

    top

    Spanish 400-LEVEL

    HISP-S 407 Survey of Spanish Literature (3credits)   LITERATURE 
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    This panorama of Spanish literature from the Middle Ages through the Seventeenth Century focuses on texts with iconic literary characters that continue to resonate in the 20th- and 21st- century cultural imagination, including El Cid, La Celestina and Don Juan. Readings will include great works of the Spanish tradition such as Cantar de Mio Cid, La Celestina, and El burlador de Sevilla (the first play about Don Juan), and in addition to literary analysis, some assignments will involve researching current Spanish cultural production and popular media to explore the continued representation and transfigurations of these iconic characters. Class discussion and assignments will be in Spanish. Attendance and participation are essential.

    This course carries COLLEGE CASE A & H credit.

    HISP-S 407   #30168     11:15A-12:30P  MW    WH 005     Prof. Steven Wagschal
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #27589.


    HISP-S 411  SPAIN: The Cultural Context  (3 credits)                                  CULTURE
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S324 or a 300-level Spanish literature course

    What images or stereotypes of Spain and its cultures do we have and how do they deviate from reality?  What defines culture and cultural production?  How does the process of learning about a foreign culture take place?  How can we foster the development of cultural learning in Bloomington/our own community?  This course examines our notions of Spain and seeks to build a more complex understanding of contemporary Spanish culture.  In addition, we will explore and analyze the process of cultural awareness.  To accomplish these two goals, traditional classroom learning will be paired with service learning: as S411 students learn about Spanish culture they will, in turn, teach elements of it to Bloomington-area preschoolers.  The teaching component will provide both active and reflective ways to grasp cultural learning.  This course is based on the philosophy that in order to really know something, you must “learn one, do one, teach one.”

      We will study five primary areas of cultural activity, using cultural “texts” that range from literature and newspapers to music and art.  Students will then form small groups that will work together to adapt these cultural materials in order to create age-appropriate lesson plans and vocabulary that they will present in preschools.  This teaching component of the course will be guided by readings on pedagogy and culture as well as in-class workshops.  The experience gained in the preschools will then serve as an “experiential text” for class discussion.  Observational and reflective writing assignments (journals and compositions) about the teaching experience will form the basis for these discussions.
    All class discussion and writing assignments will be in Spanish.  Required readings will be in English and Spanish.
    The Mission of Service Learning in S411
    By combining academic learning with teaching experience, service learning will provide S411 students with a broader and deeper understanding of the course content.  Service learning will sharpen student awareness about cultural processes and foster a sense of civic engagement. Students will have hands-on experience related to how young children learn about culture while providing area pre-schools with valuable expertise. As S411 students and teachers you will learn about Spain’s cultural context while also passing your ideas about culture and language along to area preschoolers.
    ***Attendance is ABSOLUTELY essential for this course.  Our workshops, your group partners, and  community agencies depend on you.  All unexcused absences will have a serious negative impact on your grade.

    HISP-S 411  #18245  (Service Learning)  9:05A-11:00A   MW    BH 011    Prof. Kathleen Myers

    Note:  This course has a service learning class component.
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #27621.
    Note:  This course carries COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit and COLL (CASE) GCC, Global Civilizations and Culture credit.


    HISP-S 413  Hispanic Culture In the U.S. (3 credits)     CULTURE       
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 324 or a 300-level Spanish literature course

    This course explores Latina/o culture in the United States from the 19th century until today. Through the close study of essays, novels, short stories, poems, plays, comics, and film, we will analyze a diverse body of Latina/o cultural production in relation to various socio-historical contexts. Among the topics we will cover are included the representations of legendary resistance figures after the Mexican-American War, farm work and rural life, family and coming of age, language and identity, racial, ethnic, and political conflict, the creation and commodification of Latina/o identity, Latina/o humor, gender/sexuality, and immigration. In addition, students will further develop the concepts and skills necessary to analyze the particular ways in which different cultural texts produce meaning. 

    This course is taught in Spanish and carries COLLEGE CASE A & H and CASE DUS, Diversity in the U.S. distribution credit.

    HISP-S 413    #27496        1:00P-2:15P    TR    BH 235    Prof. Ricardo Andrés Guzmán

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #27627 and Latino Studies LATS-L 400.


    HISP-S 420  Modern Spanish-American Prose Fiction  (3 credits)            LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    In this course we will read modern Spanish-American prose fiction, asking how the relation between urban and rural cultures, cosmopolitan and regional identities has evolved over time and shaped the idea that we have of Latin America. How have writers in the 20th and 21st centuries responded to the rapid urbanization and industrialization of society? How and where do indigenous and Afro-American voices appear in their fiction, what other forms of popular culture have writers incorporated? Finally, how have writers reflected in their fiction on modern communication and transport technologies and their impact on regional identities? Concepts such as Indigenismo, Afrocubanismo, the fantastic, magic realism, and world literature will be discussed in short stories by Jorge Luis Borges, Alejo Carpentier, Lydia Cabrera, Roberto Bolaño and others, and in García Márquez’s classic novel Cien años de soledad.

    This course is taught in Spanish and carries COLLEGE CASE A & H credit.

    HISP-S 420     #30176     1:00P-2:15P    MW     SY 212     Prof. Anke Birkenmaier

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #27637.


    HISP-S 422 Hispanic Cinema (3 credits)                                                        LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    This course will provide a historical and critical overview of Latin American cinemas with brief forays into U.S.-Latina/o film. The first half of the course will be devoted to honing the terms and components of film analysis (lighting, montage, cinematography etc.) along with a historical panorama of Hispanic cinemas in specific national contexts. Topics will include silent cinema, cinema and modernity in Mexico, the emergence of narrative cinema, and national film genres and star systems in Mexico and Argentina. In the second half of the course, we will extend the historical reach up through the present and focus on select critical concepts and their articulations in Latin American, and Latina/o cinemas: spectatorship, counter cinemas, auteur theory, ideology, documentary, realism, screen violence, co-productions and transnationalism, genre cinema, and indigenous cinemas. The vast majority of films will be screened online.
    Students’ grades will be based on weekly short writing assignments, two exams, brief critical papers, and various in-class exercises using a cellphone as a movie camera.

    This course is taught in Spanish and carries COLLEGE CASE A & H credit.

    HISP-S 422   #27503      9:30A-10:45A    TR    BH 233    Prof. Jonathan Risner
                  Film Showing    6:30P-9:00P        T      BH 134

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #27612.


    HISP-S 425 Spanish Phonetics (3 credits)                                                     LINGUISTICS
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or equivalent

    This course studies on the sound system of Spanish.  Topics include the articulatory system, the characteristics and description of Spanish sounds, the patterns of Spanish sounds, the historical development of modern Spanish from Latin and the variation of the Spanish sound system.  Attention will also be given to differences between Spanish and English sounds.  A secondary goal of the course is a more native-like pronunciation as a result of a deeper understanding of how the Spanish sound system works.  Course evaluation is based on homework assignments, a class project and presentation, and three exams.

    This course carries COLLEGE CASE N & M credit.

    HISP-S 425    #26678    11:15A-12:30P    TR    BH 118(LAB)     Prof. Erik Willis

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #27647.


    HISP-S 429 Spanish Sociolinguistics and Pragmatics (3 credits)               LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title:  Pragmatics:  Language Use in Context
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or equivalent

    The objective of this course is to examine language use in context (pragmatics) and sociolinguistic variation in different varieties of Spanish. The first part of the course covers the foundational concepts of pragmatics: meaning, context, speech acts, reference, politeness/impoliteness, and key notions in discourse analysis. This course will look at grammatical concepts (conditional, subjunctive, negation, preterit/imperfect, word order, etc.) from a pragmatic perspective using data from native and non-native speakers. The second part of the course applies these notions to pragmatic and sociolinguistic variation by examining the effect of social factors (e.g. region, age, social class) on communicative language use. In this course we will analyze natural data in face-to-face interaction, computer-mediated discourse, media discourse, and from study abroad contexts in different regions of the Spanish-speaking world.

    This course carries COLLEGE CASE N & M credit.

    HISP-S 429  #27509    1:00P-2:15P   TR   BH 134  Prof. César Félix-Brasdefer

    Note:  This course may be repeated with a different topic, Pragmatics or Sociolinguistics.
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #27655.


    HISP-S 430 The Acquisition of Spanish  (3 credits)           LINGUISTICS
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or equivalent

    This course provides a foundation in the field of second language acquisition with a specific focus on Spanish. The course begins with a historical overview of second/foreign language theories and will explore in detail how learning a second/foreign language differs from learning a first language. Concepts such as language transfer, interlanguage, developmental patterns, learner individual differences and the learning environment will be discussed. Students will examine what is currently known about the acquisition of Spanish and employ methodologies and data practices commonly used in the field. Class time will include lecture, student-led discussion and practical application of theoretical concepts. Evaluation will be based on student participation/preparation, tasks completed in and outside of class, quizzes, and an original research project.

    This class carries CASE N & M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 430    #25025    2:30P-3:45P    MW    BH 345    Prof. Laura Gurzynski-Weiss

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #27664.


    HISP-S 471 Spanish American Literature 1  (3 credits)                             LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    This is a 1st 8 Week Class (January 12, 2015 – March 7, 2015)

    In this course, we will study Spanish American literature from the moment of conquest to the early 20th century.  Looking at the role of writing and literature during the colonial period and the first century of independence, we’ll pay attention to the interplay between aesthetic, cultural, social, and ideological concerns.  We will read and discuss in class a wide variety of works, including early narratives of conquest and colonization, poetry and autobiographies of the colonial period, 19th century nation-building novels, and modernist writings at the turn of the 20th century. By exploring the process of how Latin America has been “written” in the past, this course also aims to provide students with a solid background that will help them better understand Latin America in the 20th and 21st centuries.

    The course will be conducted entirely in Spanish.  This course carries CASE A & H credit.

    HISP- S 471     #30182     4:40P-5:45P    MTWR    WH 109  Prof. Alejandro Mejías-López

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #28657.


    HISP-S 481 Hispanic American National & Regional Literature (3 credits) LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    This course studies the work of authors from Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and the Caribbean diaspora in the U.S., paying particular attention to Cuba and to the ripple effect of the Cold War and Cuban Revolution in Caribbean cultural production. We will examine the cultural activity that sprung out of the Cuban Revolution, the representations of the revolutionary activity that spread throughout the region in subsequent decades, and the critiques of U.S. interventionism in the Caribbean.  We will both situate texts within their national contexts and focus our attention on their transnational dimension, exploring questions of diaspora, migration, dictatorship, and U.S.-Caribbean relations.  We will also examine constructions of race and its relationship to national and transnational identity.  Finally, we will ask how these issues affect the representation of the Caribbean and its diaspora, and what role they play in efforts to construct individual, collective, and (trans) national identities in various forms of cultural production.
    We will read and analyze works of various genres by authors such as Junot Díaz, Roberto Fernández Retamar, Rosario Ferré, Cristina García, Nicolás Guillén, Achy Obejas, Heberto Padilla, Luis Rafael Sánchez, and Ana Lydia Vega.  We will also analyze films and political speeches. Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, leading in-class discussion, writing assignments (including a final research project), and exams.

    This course is taught in Spanish and carries CASE A & H credit.

    HISP-S 481    #30190     2:30P-3:45P    TR   BH 214    Prof. Deborah Cohn

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #27602.


    HISP-S 494    Individual Readings in Hispanic Studies  (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  Consent of the department.  Permission required, call (812) 855-8612.

    This course is by authorization only.  This course is used only in emergencies pertaining to graduating seniors who are short credit hours for graduation.  This course may be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.  It may not be used as one of the course requirements for the major or minor.

    HISP-S 494      #18246     By Permission Only      Arranged       Professor Ryan Giles


    HISP-S 495 Hispanic Colloquium (3 credits)                    Taught in English
    Variable Title: 
    Remaking European Borders:  Secessionism & Globalization in the EU.

         The European Union is the product of contradictory desires for unification and difference. Thus, one central question on the European project remains unsolved: is Europe a confederation of different nation-states and peoples, or is there also such a thing as a European people? The recent emergence of vigorous secessionist movements is a new exceptional situation in which this question will have to be decided. If the EU accepts the new potential states that may result from these movements, then it will be established that a European people exists above the particular states that house the various national communities. In contrast, if the new states are expelled and forced to request admission, the assumption will be that the EU is a federation with a somewhat secondary role vis-à-vis the jurisdictions of member states.
         This course will examine the political and cultural conflictive core of the EU through the unresolved cases of regional secessionisms, with particular emphasis on the situations of Catalonia, Scotland, the Basque Country, Flanders, and Northern Italy. The course will combine two approaches. First, we will study the cultural politics of each particular regional/national case; literature and film from these contexts will help us analyze the symbolic construction of their political claims. Second, we will examine the changing forms of the nation-state in our globalized world. In this respect, we will read classical and contemporary theories of the state (by Hobbes, Hegel, Weber, Schmitt, Gramsci, Althusser, Foucault, Hardt and Negri, Galli) and we will undertake a general reflection on the relationship between regions, nations, states, supranational entities, and globalization.
       
    NOTE:  Since this course is taught in English it cannot count toward the Spanish minor or major. 

    HISP-S 495     #27580     8:00A-9:15A   TR   BH 307   Prof. Edgar Illas

    Note:  This class meets with EURO-W 406 and is cross listed with International Studies.


    HISP-S 495 Hispanic Colloquium (3 credits)                                                  LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title:  Issues in Multilingualism
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or equivalent.

    In this course, we will examine a variety of issues pertaining to multilingual acquisition, including heritage speaker bilingualism, child bilingualism, and adult L3/LN acquisition. The goal of this course is to examine how studying these instances of acquisition helps us understand basic questions of language acquisition, such as (a) how does one explain the properties of the underlying cognitive mechanisms biologically endowed in all humans, which make everyone equally equipped to acquire any and all human languages to which they have sufficient exposure in childhood, (b) how do individuals come to acquire the language of their environment, and (c) how are linguistic systems represented in the minds of individuals. Our purpose is to explore how the study of multilingualism contributes to the understanding of the acquisition process and the determination of the factors involved. This course examines the notion that investigating the specific contexts of acquisition sheds a unique and necessary light on core questions in language acquisition. Class time will be split between lectures, discussion, and practical hands-on activities designed to put theoretical knowledge into practice. Students will be evaluated based on participation, in-class and homework activities, examinations, and a final project on a topic of interest to the student and approved by the instructor.

    HISP-S 495   #30198   2:30P-3:45P   TR   BH 105    Prof. Tania Leal


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors  (3 credits)                                                LITERATURE
    Variable Title:  Survey of Spanish Literature
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    This panorama of Spanish literature from the Middle Ages through the Seventeenth Century focuses on texts with iconic literary characters that continue to resonate in the 20th- and 21st- century cultural imagination, including El Cid, La Celestina and Don Juan. Readings will include great works of the Spanish tradition such as Cantar de Mio Cid, La Celestina, and El burlador de Sevilla (the first play about Don Juan), and in addition to literary analysis, some assignments will involve researching current Spanish cultural production and popular media to explore the continued representation and transfigurations of these iconic characters. Class discussion and assignments will be in Spanish. Attendance and participation are essential.

    This course carries COLLEGE CASE A & H credit.

    HISP-S 498   #27589     11:15A-12:30P  MW    WH 005     Prof. Steven Wagschal

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 407 Survey of Spanish Literature 1.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                               CULTURE
    Variable Title:  SPAIN:  The Cultural Context
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S324 or a 300-level Spanish literature course

    What images or stereotypes of Spain and its cultures do we have and how do they deviate from reality?  What defines culture and cultural production?  How does the process of learning about a foreign culture take place?  How can we foster the development of cultural learning in Bloomington/our own community?  This course examines our notions of Spain and seeks to build a more complex understanding of contemporary Spanish culture.  In addition, we will explore and analyze the process of cultural awareness.  To accomplish these two goals, traditional classroom learning will be paired with service learning: as S411 students learn about Spanish culture they will, in turn, teach elements of it to Bloomington-area preschoolers.  The teaching component will provide both active and reflective ways to grasp cultural learning.  This course is based on the philosophy that in order to really know something, you must “learn one, do one, teach one.”

      We will study five primary areas of cultural activity, using cultural “texts” that range from literature and newspapers to music and art.  Students will then form small groups that will work together to adapt these cultural materials in order to create age-appropriate lesson plans and vocabulary that they will present in preschools.  This teaching component of the course will be guided by readings on pedagogy and culture as well as in-class workshops.  The experience gained in the preschools will then serve as an “experiential text” for class discussion.  Observational and reflective writing assignments (journals and compositions) about the teaching experience will form the basis for these discussions.
    All class discussion and writing assignments will be in Spanish.  Required readings will be in English and Spanish.
    The Mission of Service Learning in S411
    By combining academic learning with teaching experience, service learning will provide S411 students with a broader and deeper understanding of the course content.  Service learning will sharpen student awareness about cultural processes and foster a sense of civic engagement. Students will have hands-on experience related to how young children learn about culture while providing area pre-schools with valuable expertise. As S411 students and teachers you will learn about Spain’s cultural context while also passing your ideas about culture and language along to area preschoolers.
    ***Attendance is ABSOLUTELY essential for this course.  Our workshops, your group partners, and  community agencies depend on you.  All unexcused absences will have a serious negative impact on your grade.

    HISP-S 498  #27621 (Service Learning)  9:05A-11:00A   MW    BH 011    Prof. Kathleen Myers

    Note:  This course has a service learning class component.
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 411 SPAIN: The Cultural Context.
    Note:  This course carries COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit and COLL (CASE) GCC, Global Civilizations and Culture credit.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                                 CULTURE
    Variable Title:  Hispanic Culture in the U.S.
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 324 or a 300-level Spanish literature course

    This course explores Latina/o culture in the United States from the 19th century until today. Through the close study of essays, novels, short stories, poems, plays, comics, and film, we will analyze a diverse body of Latina/o cultural production in relation to various socio-historical contexts. Among the topics we will cover are included the representations of legendary resistance figures after the Mexican-American War, farm work and rural life, family and coming of age, language and identity, racial, ethnic, and political conflict, the creation and commodification of Latina/o identity, Latina/o humor, gender/sexuality, and immigration. In addition, students will further develop the concepts and skills necessary to analyze the particular ways in which different cultural texts produce meaning. 

    This course is taught in Spanish and carries COLLEGE CASE A & H and CASE DUS, Diversity in the U.S. distribution credit.

    HISP-S 498    #27627    1:00P-2:15P    TR    BH 235    Prof. Ricardo Andrés Guzmán

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 413 Hispanic Culture in the U.S.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                                  LITERATUE
    Variable Title:  Modern Spanish-American Prose Fiction
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    In this course we will read modern Spanish-American prose fiction, asking how the relation between urban and rural cultures, cosmopolitan and regional identities has evolved over time and shaped the idea that we have of Latin America. How have writers in the 20th and 21st centuries responded to the rapid urbanization and industrialization of society? How and where do indigenous and Afro-American voices appear in their fiction, what other forms of popular culture have writers incorporated? Finally, how have writers reflected in their fiction on modern communication and transport technologies and their impact on regional identities? Concepts such as Indigenismo, Afrocubanismo, the fantastic, magic realism, and world literature will be discussed in short stories by Jorge Luis Borges, Alejo Carpentier, Lydia Cabrera, Roberto Bolaño and others, and in García Márquez’s classic novel Cien años de soledad.

    This course is taught in Spanish and carries COLLEGE CASE A & H credit.

    HISP-S 498     #27637     1:00P-2:15P    MW     SY 212     Prof. Anke Birkenmaier

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 420 Modern Spanish-American Prose Fiction.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credit)                                          LITERATURE
    Variable Title:  Hispanic Cinema
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    This course will provide a historical and critical overview of Latin American cinemas with brief forays into U.S.-Latina/o film. The first half of the course will be devoted to honing the terms and components of film analysis (lighting, montage, cinematography etc.) along with a historical panorama of Hispanic cinemas in specific national contexts. Topics will include silent cinema, cinema and modernity in Mexico, the emergence of narrative cinema, and national film genres and star systems in Mexico and Argentina. In the second half of the course, we will extend the historical reach up through the present and focus on select critical concepts and their articulations in Latin American, and Latina/o cinemas: spectatorship, counter cinemas, auteur theory, ideology, documentary, realism, screen violence, co-productions and transnationalism, genre cinema, and indigenous cinemas. The vast majority of films will be screened online.

    Students’ grades will be based on weekly short writing assignments, two exams, brief critical papers, and various in-class exercises using a cellphone as a movie camera. 

    This course is taught in Spanish and carries COLLEGE CASE A & H credit.

    HISP-S 498   #27612      9:30A-10:45A    TR    BH 233    Prof. Jonathan Risner
                  Film Showing    6:30P-9:00P        T      BH 134

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 422 Hispanic Cinema.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                                 LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title: Spanish Phonetics
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or equivalent

    This course studies on the sound system of Spanish.  Topics include the articulatory system, the characteristics and description of Spanish sounds, the patterns of Spanish sounds, the historical development of modern Spanish from Latin and the variation of the Spanish sound system.  Attention will also be given to differences between Spanish and English sounds.  A secondary goal of the course is a more native-like pronunciation as a result of a deeper understanding of how the Spanish sound system works.  Course evaluation is based on homework assignments, a class project and presentation, and three exams.

    This course carries COLLEGE CASE N & M credit.

    HISP-S 498   #27647    11:15A-12:30P    TR    BH 118 (LAB)     Prof. Erik Willis

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 425 Spanish Phonetics.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                                 LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title:  Pragmatics: Language Use in Context
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or equivalent

    The objective of this course is to examine language use in context (pragmatics) and sociolinguistic variation in different varieties of Spanish. The first part of the course covers the foundational concepts of pragmatics: meaning, context, speech acts, reference, politeness/impoliteness, and key notions in discourse analysis. This course will look at grammatical concepts (conditional, subjunctive, negation, preterit/imperfect, word order, etc.) from a pragmatic perspective using data from native and non-native speakers. The second part of the course applies these notions to pragmatic and sociolinguistic variation by examining the effect of social factors (e.g. region, age, social class) on communicative language use. In this course we will analyze natural data in face-to-face interaction, computer-mediated discourse, media discourse, and from study abroad contexts in different regions of the Spanish-speaking world.

    This course carries COLLEGE CASE N & M credit.

    HISP-S 498  #27655    1:00P-2:15P   TR   BH 134  Prof. César Félix-Brasdefer

    Note:  This course may be repeated with a different topic, Sociolinguistics or Pragmatics
    Note:  This course meets with HISP-S 429 Hispanic Sociolinguistics and Pragmatics,
    VT: Pragmatics: Language Use in Context.


    HISP-S 498  Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                              LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title:  The Acquisition of Spanish
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or equivalent

    This course provides a foundation in the field of second language acquisition with a specific focus on Spanish. The course begins with a historical overview of second/foreign language theories and will explore in detail how learning a second/foreign language differs from learning a first language. Concepts such as language transfer, interlanguage, developmental patterns, learner individual differences and the learning environment will be discussed. Students will examine what is currently known about the acquisition of Spanish and employ methodologies and data practices commonly used in the field. Class time will include lecture, student-led discussion and practical application of theoretical concepts. Evaluation will be based on student participation/preparation, tasks completed in and outside of class, quizzes, and an original research project.

    This class carries CASE N & M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 498    #27664    2:30P-3:45P    MW    BH 345    Prof. Laura Gurzynski-Weiss

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 430 The Acquisition of Spanish.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                               LITERATURE
    Variable Title: Spanish American Literature 1
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    This is a 1st 8 Week Class (January 12, 2015 – March 7, 2015)

    In this course, we will study Spanish American literature from the moment of conquest to the early 20th century.  Looking at the role of writing and literature during the colonial period and the first century of independence, we’ll pay attention to the interplay between aesthetic, cultural, social, and ideological concerns.  We will read and discuss in class a wide variety of works, including early narratives of conquest and colonization, poetry and autobiographies of the colonial period, 19th century nation-building novels, and modernist writings at the turn of the 20th century. By exploring the process of how Latin America has been “written” in the past, this course also aims to provide students with a solid background that will help them better understand Latin America in the 20th and 21st centuries.

    The course will be conducted entirely in Spanish.  This course carries CASE A & H credit.

    HISP- S 498     #28657     4:40P-5:45P    MTWR    WH 109   Prof. Alejandro Mejías-López

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 471, Spanish American Literature 1.


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                                                 LITERATURE
    Variable Title: Hispanic American National & Regional Literature
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    This course studies the work of authors from Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and the Caribbean diaspora in the U.S., paying particular attention to Cuba and to the ripple effect of the Cold War and Cuban Revolution in Caribbean cultural production. We will examine the cultural activity that sprung out of the Cuban Revolution, the representations of the revolutionary activity that spread throughout the region in subsequent decades, and the critiques of U.S. interventionism in the Caribbean.  We will both situate texts within their national contexts and focus our attention on their transnational dimension, exploring questions of diaspora, migration, dictatorship, and U.S.-Caribbean relations.  We will also examine constructions of race and its relationship to national and transnational identity.  Finally, we will ask how these issues affect the representation of the Caribbean and its diaspora, and what role they play in efforts to construct individual, collective, and (trans) national identities in various forms of cultural production.
    We will read and analyze works of various genres by authors such as Junot Díaz, Roberto Fernández Retamar, Rosario Ferré, Cristina García, Nicolás Guillén, Achy Obejas, Heberto Padilla, Luis Rafael Sánchez, and Ana Lydia Vega.  We will also analyze films and political speeches. Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, leading in-class discussion, writing assignments (including a final research project), and exams.

    This course is taught in Spanish and carries CASE A & H credit.

    HISP-S 498    #27602     2:30P-3:45P    TR   BH 214    Prof. Deborah Cohn

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 481, Hispanic American National & Regional Literature.


    HISP-S 499  Honors Research in Spanish (1 -3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  Approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.   
    BY PERMISSION ONLY.  Call (812) 855-8612

    Majors doing honors in Spanish would register for this class after they have completed S498 and while they are writing their honors thesis.  Contact Karla Allgood via email at kallgood@indiana.edu or see in person in BH 844 for permission arrangements.

    HISP-S 499    #18247      By Permission Only    Arranged          Professor Ryan Giles

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