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Undergraduate Studies

Undergraduate Course Descriptions: Spring 2016

Catalan
Portuguese
Spanish 100 AND 200-LEVEL
Spanish 300-LEVEL
Spanish 400-LEVEL

  • Courses, times, days, rooms, and/or instructors are subject to change
  • Please review the entire course description. Multiple descriptions may be listed for courses with multiple sections.

  • CATALAN

    HISP-C 494  Individual Readings in Catalan Studies  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-C 105 or consent of the Instructor
    Variable Title: Catalan Political Non-Fictions: Journalism, Documentary, Interventions

         The emergence of Catalonia as “a nation without a state” and now “a nation in search of a state” constitutes a singular event in the context of modern Europe. Catalonia as a political and cultural entity has not followed any of the two paths that are common in European regions: neither has it become a sovereign state nor has it gradually dissolved into another, larger national union. Instead, Catalonia occupies an in-between position that is a particularly productive space to explore the puzzling relations between cultures, states, and globalization.
         The course will analyze the intersection of culture and politics in a variety of Catalan non-fictional texts, documentaries and interventions. The course builds on one fundamental premise. While the intersection of culture and politics in fictional texts must be deciphered through an allegorical reading, in non-fictional works this intersection takes other forms linked to activism, militancy, reflection, and even, hélas!, truth and beauty. Materials will range from the medieval chronicles of the Catalan kingdoms to leftist and conservative internet blogs. We will also read more canonical works by modern essayists Josep Maria de Sagarra, Josep Pla, Gaziel, and Joan Fuster, paying particular attention to texts written in exile during the Franco era.
         The course will be taught in Catalan. Students who have not taken Catalan should seek the consent of the instructor. This course can fulfill the elective 300/400 level requirement for the Spanish major.

    HISP-C 494  #9742  PERM  11:15A-12:30P  MW  BH 345  Professor Edgar Illas
    Note:  This course meets with HISP-C 492 and HISP-C 618

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    PORTUGUESE

    HISP-P 135 Intensive Portuguese (4 credits) 

    For students from secondary school placed into the second semester of first‑year study or those with a strong background in Spanish or another Romance Language. Content of P100 and P150 covered at an accelerated pace. Credit not given for both P135 and P150. This course can count for the Spanish major 300/400 level elective.

    HISP-P 135  #5026       9:05A-9:55A     MTWR    BH 241    STAFF 
    Note: This class meets with HISP-P 491.
    ___________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-P 150 Elementary Portuguese II (4 credits) 
    Prerequisite: P100 or equivalent

    Introduction to present‑day Portuguese, with an interactive, communicative focus and structured drills for mastery of phonology, basic structural patterns, and functional vocabulary.  To be taken in sequence after P100, Elementary Portuguese I. Attendance in language laboratory may be required.

    HISP-P 150  #5027    10:10A-11:00A    MTWR    BH 241    STAFF
    ___________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-P 250 Second‑Year Portuguese II (3 credits) 
    Prerequisite: P200 or equivalent. 

    Second semester of second‑year Portuguese, with increased emphasis on communicative exercises and selected readings. Attendance in the language laboratory may be required.                      

    HISP-P 250   #9743      10:10A-11:00A    MWF    BH 333    STAFF
    HISP-P 250   #12763    11:15A-12:05P     MWF   WH 008    STAFF      
    ___________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-P 317 Reading & Conversation in Portuguese   (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: P200-P250 or equivalent

    Taught in Portuguese, this course emphasizes conversational and reading skills using plays, short stories, poetry, and novels from Brazil, Portugal, and Lusophone Africa.  Students will also be introduced to the basics of literary appreciation.            

    HISP-P 317    #32932      11:15A-12:05P    MWF     BH 134    STAFF
    Note:  This course meets with HISP-P 492.
    _________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-P 425: Structure of Portuguese Language
    Prerequisite:  HISP-P 250 or equivalent

    Introduction to the study of the structure of the Portuguese language, both from a descriptive and a prescriptive point of view. Focusing on realia, including TV, advertisement and newspaper texts, we will examine topics that are particularly challenging to native speakers of English and Spanish, such as uses of “ser” and “estar,” the subjunctive, verbal aspect and mood, as well as common pronunciation difficulties. Our study will focus on Portuguese phonetics, phonology, morphology, and syntax, and it will include relevant aspects of historical grammar, dialectology, semantics, and pragmatics. Readings and class discussion in Portuguese.

    HISP-P 425  #30384  2:30P-3:45P  MW  SY 0008  Professor Luciana Namorato
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-P 498 and HISP-P 525.


    HISP-P 494  Readings in Luso-Brazilian Literature (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  Consent of the Department.

    May be repeated for a maximum of up to 6 credit hours as long as each registration covers a different topic.

    HISP-P 494  #5029  PERMISSION NEEDED        ARRANGED     Professor Luciana Namorato


    HISP-P 495  Luso-Brazilian Colloquium (3 credits)
    Variable Title: Aging, Gender & Society in Lusophone Literature ​

    While aging is a universal experience, the meaning of the different stages of life differs dramatically among various cultures. This course examines representations of the aging process in Luso-Brazilian literature and popular culture. Our goal is to understand how the literature written in Portuguese in Brazil, Portugal and Portuguese-speaking African countries represent the young and the elderly vis-à-vis issues of gender, race and economic strata. We will read prose and poetry, and we will closely examine film and television productions, as well as advertisement and newspaper texts in order to better interpret the cultural construction of age. The theoretical questions and social issues the course examines will touch upon broader themes, such as gender inequality, racial prejudice, consumerism, public health, medical discourse, beauty industry and the politics of everyday spaces. Readings and class discussion in Portuguese.

    HISP-P 495    #30428    1:00P-2:15P   MW   SY 0008   Professor Luciana Namorato
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-P 498 and HISP-P 695.


    HISP-P 498  Portuguese Honors Seminar  (3 credits)
    Variable Title:  Structure of Portuguese Language 
    Concent of the Department.

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Portuguese.  This HISP-P 498, section #30437 meets with HISP-P 425 and HISP-P 525 Structure of Portuguese Language.

    HISP-P 498  #30437    PERMISSION    2:30P-3:45P   MW   SY 0008   Professor Luciana Namorato
                        
    Note: Contact Karla Allgood in GA 2169 for permission.   kallgood@indiana.edu

    See course description for HISP-P 425 Structure of Portuguese Language below:

    Introduction to the study of the structure of the Portuguese language, both from a descriptive and a prescriptive point of view. Focusing on realia, including TV, advertisement and newspaper texts, we will examine topics that are particularly challenging to native speakers of English and Spanish, such as uses of “ser” and “estar,” the subjunctive, verbal aspect and mood, as well as common pronunciation difficulties. Our study will focus on Portuguese phonetics, phonology, morphology, and syntax, and it will include relevant aspects of historical grammar, dialectology, semantics, and pragmatics. Readings and class discussion in Portuguese.


    HISP-P 498  Portuguese Honors Seminar  (3 credits)  
    Variable Title:  Aging, Gender & Society in Lusophone Literature ​

    This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Portuguese.  This HISP-P 498, section #30438 meets with HISP-P 495  and HISP- P 695 Luso-Brazilian Colloquium.

    HISP-P 498  #30438    PERMISSION    1:00P-2:15P    MW    SY 0008   Professor Luciana Namorato
                        
    Note: Contact Karla Allgood in GA 2169 for permission.   kallgood@indiana.edu

    See course description for HISP-P 495 Hispanic Colloquium below:

    While aging is a universal experience, the meaning of the different stages of life differs dramatically among various cultures. This course examines representations of the aging process in Luso-Brazilian literature and popular culture. Our goal is to understand how the literature written in Portuguese in Brazil, Portugal and Portuguese-speaking African countries represent the young and the elderly vis-à-vis issues of gender, race and economic strata. We will read prose and poetry, and we will closely examine film and television productions, as well as advertisement and newspaper texts in order to better interpret the cultural construction of age. The theoretical questions and social issues the course examines will touch upon broader themes, such as gender inequality, racial prejudice, consumerism, public health, medical discourse, beauty industry and the politics of everyday spaces. Readings and class discussion in Portuguese.


    HISP-P 499  Honors Research in Portuguese  (1 – 3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-P 498
    By Permission Only:  Call (812) 855-8612 or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu

    Approval of the Director of Portuguese Studies.

    HISP-P 499   #5031     PERMISSION NEEDED     ARRANGED     Professor Luciana Namorato
    Note:  This class open to Portuguese Honors students only.

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    Spanish 100 & 200-LEVEL

    HISP-S 100 Elementary Spanish  (4 credits)  
    By permission only.  Call (812) 855-8612 or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu

    The course presents a four‑skills approach to Spanish with an emphasis on critical thinking skills. Students will practice speaking in small groups in class as well as reading and discussing materials in Spanish. Grading is based on exams, homework, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Enrollment in S100 is restricted to those with less than 2 years of high school Spanish or with the consent of the department. All others must enroll in S105. The next course in the sequence for HISP-S 100 students would be HISP-S 150 Elementary Spanish II.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2016 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S. 


    HISP-S 105  First Year Spanish (4 credits)

    This introductory course is for students with 2 or more years of high-school study and covers the essential grammar and vocabulary of first-year Spanish. This course presents a four-skills approach to Spanish with an emphasis on critical thinking skills.  Students will practice speaking in small groups in class as well as reading and discussing materials in Spanish.  Grading is based on exams, homework, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Homework load is substantial. Credit not given for both HISP-S 105 and HISP-S 100 or HISP-S 105 and HISP-S150.The next course in this sequence is HISP-S 200 Second-Year Spanish I. 

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2016 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 150 Elementary Spanish II (4 credits)  
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 100

    This course continues the work of S100 with continued emphasis on all four skills and on critical thinking skills. Students will practice speaking in small groups in class, as well as reading and discussing materials in Spanish. Grading is based on exams, homework, compositions, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. The next course in this sequence is HISP-S 200 Second-Year Spanish I.

    Note: HISP-S 150 is for those students who took HISP-S 100 Elementary Spanish here at IUB or took an equivalent course at a regional campus or other university.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2016 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 200 Second‑Year Spanish I    (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 105 or HISP-S 150 or equivalent. 

    This course reviews some of the basic structures studied in the first year, and examines them in greater detail. Emphasis
    remains on the four skills and on critical thinking skills. Cultural readings and a mystery story are also included. Grades are based on exams, homework, compositions, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Homework load is substantial. The next course in this sequence is HISP-S 250 Second-Year Spanish II.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2016 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 250 Second‑Year Spanish II  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: HISP-S 200 or equivalent. 

    This course continues the work of HISP-S 200 with a continued emphasis on the four skills and on critical thinking skills.  Short literary readings are also included. Grades are based on exams, homework, compositions, participation, attendance, and a cumulative final exam. Homework load is substantial. After successful completion of this course, the foreign language requirement is fulfilled for schools that require a 4th -semester proficiency. For those students who wish to go on for a minor or major in Spanish, the next course to take would be HISP-S 280 Spanish Grammar in Context.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/  Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2016 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 280  Spanish Grammar in Context (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: S250 or equivalent.

    The overall goal of this course is to provide students with the language skills necessary to pursue upper division course work in Spanish. The main focus is on the development of formal linguistic skills through explicit grammar instruction and review, vocabulary building exercises, reading original texts by contemporary authors, and exploring the link between literature and culture through writing and conversation.
    The main objective of S280 is to strengthen students’ comprehension and application of the most challenging grammatical structures for second language learners within a meaningful language context. This objective will be accomplished with a thorough review and practice of problematic grammatical structures, the analysis of these and other structures in the context provided by a series of literary readings and selections from an audio book, and the application of these structures in writing and discussion sessions. The course will be conducted in Spanish.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/   Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2016 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.

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    Spanish 300-LEVEL

    HISP-S 308 Composition and Conversation in Spanish (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.  Co-requisite: may be taken concurrent with HISP-S 280.

    The objective of this course is to develop students’ oral and writing abilities in Spanish.  Students will develop writing skill in Spanish by learning and practicing the main components of different writing styles: description, narration, exposition, and argumentation.  Students will learn compositional elements that provide cohesion and coherence in both formal and informal writing styles.  Students will develop their oral skills by watching and discussing a number of critically acclaimed films from different Spanish-speaking countries which deal with a variety of cultural, social, and political issues.  To achieve the goal of improving oral proficiency, students will participate in various in-class discussions and debates on controversial topics presented in the films.  By the end of this course, students will be able to write in a variety of formal and informal writing styles and to discuss a wide range of topics.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/   Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2016 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 315  Spanish in the Business World  (3 credits) 
    Prerequisite: S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    The objective of this course is to enhance cross-cultural and linguistic competence in the business world through both the study of the use of Spanish in business and the examination of the codes, costumes, and other particular manifestations of business culture across the Spanish-speaking world.  Students will familiarize themselves with commercial Spanish, both written and oral, in a variety of formats and contexts.  Students will work on reading, writing and translating several types of documents and improve their oral skills though practice related to real life business situations. Students will also acquire knowledge on the customs, protocols, and cultural practices of the business world in Spanish-speaking countries and communities. Through concrete case studies, students will critically engage on a variety of topics which may include cultural stereotyping, cross-cultural business communication, cultural behaviors, and the ethics of international commerce.  This course is entirely conducted in Spanish.

    HISP-S 315  #10878     9:05A-9:55A     MWF      BH 135       STAFF


    HISP-S 317 Spanish Conversation & Diction (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This class meets five times a week. It includes contrastive study of Spanish and English pronunciation.  Intensive controlled conversation correlated with readings, reports, debates, and group discussions.  S317 may be repeated once for credit.  S317 is NOT open to native speakers of Spanish.

    HISP-S 317   #5094       9:05A-9:55A      MTWRF        BH 016       STAFF
    _________________________________________________________________________________________

    HISP-S 322  Introduction to Film Analysis in Spanish  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent

    This course aims: (1) to introduce students to the formal elements common to cinema and the terms of film analysis in Spanish; (2) to expose them to different film genres; (3) provide them with a basic understanding of cultural and historical factors that have influenced film production in Latin America and Spain. The first half of the course will be devoted to recognizing and understanding the formal components of film. In the course’s second half, we will consider notions of film narrative along with theoretical terms common to film studies and how they manifest themselves in Latin American and Spanish cinemas. The class will watch two movies per week. Students will view the movies during evening screenings on Mondays and Wednesdays or, when possible, by streaming the movies. Evening screenings will be optional, although students are obligated to watch the films prior to the class in which they will be discussed.  

    HISP-S 322  #30589   1:00P-2:15P   TR   SY 006   Professor Jonathan Risner
    Evening Screening Times: 7:00P-9:00P   MW    TBA


    HISP-S 324 Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Cultures (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This course offers an introduction to the analysis of Hispanic cultural production. It provides students with the vocabulary used in cultural analysis, helps them improve their critical thinking skills and critical expression in Spanish, and attain a more complex understanding of what we often refer to as Hispanic cultures.  Special attention will be given to visual culture (including fine arts, photography, film, comics), to critical categories such as gender, sexuality, and race, as well as to concepts specific to, or particularly relevant for, the analysis of cultural manifestations from across the Spanish-speaking world, such as (post)colonialism, transculturation, mestizaje, hybridity, nationalism, border, migration, and memory. The linguistic and analytical tools that students learn in this course will prepare them for more advanced classes in literature and culture.

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    See schedule of classes at Registrar’s web page:  http://registrar.indiana.edu/   Click on Calendars and Schedules, then Schedule of Classes, then spring 2016 for active class numbers, times and days for this semester. We are listed under HISP-S.


    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics  (3 credits)
    Prerequisites:  S280 or S310 or equivalent

    This course examines the basic linguistic structure of Spanish based on the principal fields of linguistic studies.  The course begins with an overview of the characteristics of human language.  Course topics include the structure and order of words (syntax), the forms and structure of words (morphology), the sounds of Spanish (phonetics and phonology) and how they compare with English, and how Spanish varies across regions, and by social considerations.

    Class time is primarily lecture based, but also includes linguistic exercises, analysis, and discussion.  Course activities include self-analysis of Spanish abilities and comparison with native speakers (the goal being to improve the student’s language abilities by contrastive analysis of linguistic structure).  Evaluation is based on participation, homework assignments, projects, exams and presentations. 
    This class carries CASE N & M credit.

    HISP-S 326    #15617    1:00P-2:15P   TR   BH 331    Professor Erik Willis


    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 280 or equivalent.

    1. Course description:

    This course is an introduction to basic concepts and methodology used in Spanish Linguistics. The main goal of the course is to provide students with the opportunity to learn the tools of linguistic analysis and to apply them to the study of Spanish. Attention will be given to different levels of analysis in linguistics including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and language variation. Class time will be divided between lecture, problem-solving exercises, and discussion. Evaluation will be based on exams, class participation, homework, experiments, and other assignments.

    2. Goals:
    After successful completion of this course, the student will:

    3. Topics:
    1.Introduction to linguistics
    2.Phonetics and phonology
    3.Morpho-syntax
    4.Semantics
    5.Regional variation
    6.Bilingualism in USA

    This course carries CASE N&M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 326   #10450  1:00P-2:15P   TR   BH 238  Prof. Manuel Díaz-Campos


    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.         

    This course is an introduction to the study of Hispanic Linguistics and provides students with a foundation in the main areas of linguistic analysis. It begins by exploring the goals of Linguistics as a scientific field of study and by examining the features of natural languages. After this general overview the course focuses on the description of the sounds of Spanish and their organization (phonetics and phonology), the structure of words and the different processes of word formation (morphology), the combination of words in larger units of sentence structure (syntax), and the study of word and sentence meaning in its interaction with context (semantics and pragmatics). These areas of study will be explored using data from different varieties of Spanish. The course ends with an overview of the history of Spanish.
    Student evaluation is based on class participation, weekly homework assignments, midterm and final exams, an oral presentation, and a short research project.

    This class carries CASE N & M credit.

    HISP-S 326  #9774  HONORS   2:30P-3:45P   TR  WH 119  Professor Patricia Matos Amaral
    Note:  This class open to only Hutton Honors Students.


    HISP-S 326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics  (3 credits)   
    Prerequisites:  S280 or S310 or equivalent

    Introduces the basic concepts of Hispanic linguistics and establishes the background for the future application of linguistic principles.  The course surveys linguistic properties in Spanish, including phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax.  Additional introductory material on sociolinguistics, pragmatics, second language acquisition, and historical linguistics will be included.  This class carries CASE N & M credit.

    HISP-S 326  #11583        9:30A-10:45A      TR      BH 229    STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #9771        10:10A-11:00A    MWF   BH 134     STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #32507      11:15A-12:05P     MWF   BH 331     STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #11729      11:15A-12:30P       TR     SY 210      STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #9772          1:00P-2:15P         MW    BH 137     STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #9775          1:25P-2:15P       MWF    BH 222     STAFF 
    HISP-S 326  #11166        2:30P-3:45P         TR      BH 229      STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #9776          2:30P-3:45P         TR      BH 333      STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #9777          4:00P-5:15P          TR     BH 134      STAFF
    HISP-S 326  #10879        4:40P-5:30P       MWR   SY 106      STAFF

    HISP-S 328 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This course provides students with an introduction to the study of Hispanic literatures. Through in-class discussions and written work, students will acquire conceptual tools in Spanish and learn to develop grounded interpretations of texts by analyzing their content (story, ideas, themes), the ways through which content is structured and expressed by the way texts are written, and the relationship between a text and its historical, cultural, social, and/or political context. The course’s approach stems from the proposition that by better understanding the way texts creates meaning and engage with the ideas, changes, and preoccupations of their time, we will also be able to become better, more sophisticated readers in Spanish (and beyond). The analytical tools that students learn in this course will also prepare them for more advanced classes in literature and culture. 

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328   #9940   HONORS   11:15A-12:30P  MW  SY 103   STAFF
    Note:  The class is open to Hutton Honors Students only.


    HISP-S 328 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S280 or S310 or equivalent.

    This course provides students with an introduction to the study of Hispanic literatures. Through in-class discussions and written work, students will acquire conceptual tools in Spanish and learn to develop grounded interpretations of texts by analyzing their content (story, ideas, themes), the ways through which content is structured and expressed by the way texts are written, and the relationship between a text and its historical, cultural, social, and/or political context. The course’s approach stems from the proposition that by better understanding the way texts creates meaning and engage with the ideas, changes, and preoccupations of their time, we will also be able to become better, more sophisticated readers in Spanish (and beyond). The analytical tools that students learn in this course will also prepare them for more advanced classes in literature and culture. 

    This course carries CASE A&H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 328       #11059    9:05A-9:55A     MWF    SY 0006    STAFF
    HISP-S 328       #9790      9:30A-10:45A   MW      AC C101    STAFF
    HISP-S 328       #9785      9:30A-10:45A    TR      BH 333       STAFF
    HISP-S 328       #9786      9:30A-10:45A    TR      BH 331       STAFF
    HISP-S 328       #9788     11:15A-12:30P   TR      SY 108       STAFF
    HISP-S 328       #9791      12:20P-1:10P    MWF   SY 0006     STAFF
    HISP-S 328       #9789      1:00P-2:15P      TR      WH 119      STAFF
    HISP-S 328       #10920    2:30P-3:45P      TR      BH 237       STAFF
    HISP-S 328       #9787      4:00P-5:15P      TR      BH 336      STAFF
    HISP-S 328       #10912    4:00P-5:15P      TR      WH 109     STAFF


    HISP-S 334 Panoramas of Hispanic Literature  (3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  S328 or equivalent.       
                                                      
    This panoramic course is intended to help students expand on their knowledge of authors, literary movements, and Spanish culture and history more broadly, while improving their writing and speaking abilities in Spanish as well as their critical and analytical skills. Students will read, analyze, and discuss a broad selection of texts from different periods.  Class conducted entirely in Spanish. 
    This course carries CASE A& H and CASE GCC distribution credit.

    HISP-S 334    #9792  (Peninsular)   11:15A-12:30P    TR   WH 008   STAFF

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    Spanish 400-LEVEL

    HISP-S 407 Survey of Spanish Literature 1 (3credits)  LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    This course studies representative Spanish texts from the Middle Ages to the Golden Age (XII-XVII centuries).  We will read and discuss early poetry, theater and prose, observing how classic characters, such as the knight, the go-between, and the rogue; and overarching themes like love and war, tolerance and intolerance, are developed and reinterpreted in different cultural and historical contexts. 

    This course carries CASE A & H credit.

    HISP-S 407   #14538       2:30P-3:45P   TR    BH 138    Prof. Ryan Giles
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #13150.


    HISP-S 411  SPAIN: The Cultural Context  (3 credits)          CULTURE
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S324 or a 300-level Spanish literature course

    1992 marked a year of renewed global recognition for Spain.  As the country celebrated the Quincentennial of Columbus’ voyage and the dawn of the Spanish Empire, it also hosted both the 1992 Olympics (Barcelona) and the World Expo (Seville), and received the title of Cultural Capital of Europe (Madrid).  Taking these cultural events as our focal point for understanding Spain’s emergence from Franco’s dictatorship, along with its current economic and social challenges, popularly known as “La Crisis,” this course will analyze a wide variety of verbal and visual texts to access the interplay of history, memory, and the development of cultural identities within a contemporary global framework. 

    HISP-S 411  #5095  (1st 8 Weeks)   1:00P-2:15P  MTWR  BH 240  Prof. Kathleen Myers

    Note: This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (1st 8 Weeks), #13166.
    Note:  This course carries CASE A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit and CASE GCC, Global Civilizations and Culture credit.


    HISP-S 412  Spanish America: The Cultural Context  (3 credits) CULTURE
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 324 or a 300-level Spanish literature course

    This course examines the representation of Latin America as a distinct cultural entity. It explores the ways in which the region and its inhabitants were first depicted following Columbus’s "discovery" of the continent, and it offers a critical reflection of some of the major cultural concepts that continue to be used to define it, including notions of mestizaje, hybridity, and transculturation. Through the analysis and discussion of visual culture, music, literature and film students will develop their understanding of Latin American culture, and they will reflect on the cultural politics of representation. Evaluation will be based on active participation in class discussions, homework and quizzes, compositions, and exams.

    This course is taught in Spanish and carries CASE A & H and CASE GCC, Global Civilization & Culture distribution credit.

    HISP-S 412  #32497   2:30P-3:45P   MW   BH 209   Prof. Olimpia Rosenthal
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #32504.


    HISP-S 419  Modern Spanish Prose Fiction  (3 credits)      LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    Contesting Repression: 20th Century Spanish Fiction (1939-1990)

    With the fascist triumph in the Spanish Civil War and the installation of the Franco Regime, Spain began one of the most complex periods of its history. The experiences of the war itself and the repressive dictatorship have been determining factors in Spain’s cultural production through most of the twentieth century.  Ultimately permeating society, their effects have lingered on long after the country’s transition to democracy was well under way in the 1980s.  This course will analyze twentieth-century Spanish cultural production within the frame of repression and resistance, looking at ways intellectuals have configured and contested forces of constraint.

    The first section of the course aims to explore how artists both represented and contested repression and the totalitarian state from within the system itself (1939-1975).  How can those within position themselves in order to contemplate and resist a system that labels and combats both of these very acts as subversive?  We will explore the kinds of spaces writers created that allowed them room for maneuver and within which they could both struggle with authority and speak of the experience as a subject of totalitarianism. The second section of the course examines the idea of contesting in terms of “response” as the country underwent a transition to democracy and moved beyond the Franco regime (1975-1990).  Here, we will look at the way these texts respond to the Franco era as an apparently past event, both reexamining that experience, and voicing a preoccupation with self-construction and defining the emergent nation. 

    Taking the political frame of repression as a point of departure, we will also move beyond to consider repression more broadly and its implications in different contexts.  Some of the issues we will discuss in our readings are (self)censorship, exile, notions of gender and sexuality, memory, the power of writing/storytelling, and identity construction.
    Class discussions and assignments will be in Spanish.  Evaluation will likely be based on a combination of active participation, oral presentations, and analytical essays.


    This course is taught in Spanish and carries CASE A & H credit.

    HISP-S 419  #30645   9:30A-10:45A   MW   BH 219   Prof. Melissa Dinverno
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #30652.


    HISP-S 425 Spanish Phonetics (3 credits)              LINGUISTICS
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or equivalent

    This course studies the sound system of Spanish.  Topics include the articulatory system, the characteristics and description of Spanish sounds, the patterns of Spanish sounds, the historical development of modern Spanish from Latin, and the variation within the Spanish sound system.  Attention will also be given to differences between Spanish and English sounds.  A secondary goal of the course is to develop a more native-like pronunciation as a result of a deeper understanding of how the Spanish sound system works.  Course evaluation is based on homework assignments, data analysis, a class project and presentation, and two exams.

    This course carries CASE N & M credit.

    HISP-S 425    #12597    4:00P-5:15P   TR    BH 108(LAB)    Prof. Erik Willis
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #13182.


    HISP-S 427  The Structure of Spanish (3 credits)     LINGUISTICS
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or equivalent

    This course is an introduction to the grammatical structure of Spanish, with particular attention to the structure of morphology (word formation) and syntax (sentence formation). It will examine the grammatical properties of nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, and the pronominal system of Spanish. It will then look at the principles that govern the internal structure of simple and complex sentences from both a syntactic and pragmatic perspective. Some of the topics that will be examined in this course include word order, negation, tense/aspect/ mood, speech act verbs, and semantic / pragmatic meaning. The course will end with an overview of syntactic cross-linguistic variation across varieties of Spanish in Spain and Latin America.

    This course carries CASE N & M credit.

    HISP-S 427  #30658  9:30A-10:45A  TR  WH 109  Prof. César Félix-Brasdefer
    Note:  This class meets with HSIP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #13161.


    HISP-S 429 Spanish Sociolinguistics and Pragmatics (3 credits)  LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title:  Pragmatics:  Language Use in Context
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or equivalent

    The objective of this course is to examine language use in context (pragmatics) and sociolinguistic variation in different varieties of Spanish. The first part of the course covers the foundational concepts of pragmatics: meaning, context, speech acts, reference, politeness/impoliteness, and key notions in discourse analysis. This course will look at grammatical concepts (conditional, subjunctive, negation, preterit/imperfect, word order, etc.) from a pragmatic perspective using data from native and non-native speakers. The second part of the course applies these notions to pragmatic and sociolinguistic variation by examining the effect of social factors (e.g. region, age, social class) on communicative language use. In this course we will analyze natural data in face-to-face interaction and from study abroad contexts in different regions of the Spanish-speaking world.

    This course carries COLLEGE CASE N & M credit.

    HISP-S 429  #13090  11:15A-12:30P   TR   BH 332  Prof. César Félix-Brasdefer
    Note:  This course may be repeated with a different topic, Pragmatics or Sociolinguistics.
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #13187.


    HISP-S 430 The Acquisition of Spanish  (3 credits)   LINGUISTICS
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or equivalent

    This course presents a panoramic view of the major questions, research methods, and results in the study of the acquisition of Spanish from multiple perspectives. We will explore concepts such as interlanguage, error analysis, stages of development, language transfer, and language universals. The focus of the class will be on Spanish; application activities will focus on examples produced by second language Spanish learners. The course will also trace the development of the field, from Behaviorist theories to a variety of contemporary approaches to learner language. Students will analyze structures that present challenges to learners from all levels of grammar. They will also examine samples of learner language and analyze them using the tools typically employed in the field. Class time will be divided between lectures, class discussion, and hands-on activities designed for applying theoretical knowledge to practice. Students will be evaluated based on participation, in-class and homework activities, examinations (mid-term and final), and a final project consisting of an annotated bibliography.
    This class carries CASE N & M distribution credit.

    HISP-S 430    #11288    1:00P-2:15P    MW    BH 018    Professor Tania Leal


    HISP-S 472 Spanish American Literature 2 (3 credits)     LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    This course picks up where S471 leaves off, providing a survey of Spanish American literature from the 20th century through the present. We will examine twentieth-century avant-garde movements, the “Boom” writers and feminists' response (feminismo mágico), as well as testimonio narratives. At the same time, we will look at specific literary works and movements in relation to social and political contexts, including the brutal military dictatorships of the 1970s and the narco wars of the new millennium. The course is designed to provide a deeper familiarity with 20th and 21st century Spanish American literature and to facilitate development of critical reading skills.
    Primary texts, among others, will include poetry by Agustini, Huidobro, Vallejo, Neruda, Paz, and Pizarnik; short stories and short novels by Borges, Rulfo, Fuentes, Cortázar, García Márquez, Allende, Ferré, Menchú Tum, and Bolaño. Short critical readings will also be assigned. The course will be conducted entirely in Spanish.  This course carries CASE A & H credit.

    HISP- S 472   #30680  4:00P-5:15P   MW  BH 134   Prof. Olimpia Rosenthal
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #13831.


    HISP-S 474  Hispanic Literature & Society  (3 credits)    LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    Cultural Memory and Negotiating the Past in Contemporary Spain

    Theories of cultural memory, trauma and the narration of the past have come to occupy a crucial place in literary studies, and, in the past 20 years, in Hispanic literary studies in particular.  As traumatic local and global current and past events are broadcast widely through television, film, newspapers, and literature, for example, we continue to struggle with both how to narrate them, as well as the profound implications that our narrative choices have for ourselves and others.  Increasingly over the past 15 years, debates on cultural memory, traumatic experience and the narration of the past have taken on a particular urgency in Spanish society and has been at the forefront of Spanish politics and cultural production.

    Focusing primarily on novels written since 1995, this course will study culture’s role in memory construction and the way that writers have dealt with issues of memory, history and the collective negotiation of Spain’s difficult and contentious past of civil war and dictatorship. Some of the questions we will deal with will likely include:  What role does culture, and especially literature, play in a society’s construction of the past and the way it deals with conflict in the present?  How should Spain’s past of Civil War and dictatorial repression be narrated in contemporary society?  How has literature been used to deal with what has been called collective trauma in relation to the Civil War and Francoism?  What place do the ghosts of the past have in the formation of a “new” national identity, in a politics of reconciliation, in a new cultural landscape?  How does Spain’s painful past affect younger generations who never experienced it, and what role does culture play in their experience?  To what degree do writers and directors question the limits of literature and film in representing the past?

    Class discussions and assignments will be in Spanish.  Evaluation will likely be based on a combination of active participation, oral presentations, and analytical essays.

    This course carries CASE A & H credit.

    HISP- S 474  #30687  11:15A-12:30P  MW  SB 220   Prof. Melissa Dinverno
    This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #30695.


    HISP-S 480   Argentine Literature (3 credits)           LITERATURE
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    This course provides an in-depth exploration of Argentine literature and culture from the early 19th century through the present. We will look at how key literary works in the Argentine tradition respond to—while also seeking to intervene in—social conflicts and social transformations beginning with the post-independence civil wars up through the brutal military dictatorship of the 1970s and the economic crisis of the end of the millennium. Key events in Southern Cone social history that will be discussed include civil war, nation-building, modernization, genocidal wars against Argentina’s indigenous groups, immigration, populism, socialist revolution and militancy, dictatorship and state terrorism, and globalization and the debates over privatization. We will also explore how Argentine writers have contributed to the evolution of a regional tradition that, rather than adhering strictly to national borders, ascribes to a broader and less clearly defined geographical zone along the Río de la Plata basin. This area includes northern Argentina and Uruguay as well as parts of Paraguay and Brazil, and is defined socially by phenomena including the devastating War of the Triple Alliance (1864-70) as well as by large waves of migration and legal and illegal immigration in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
    Primary texts will include essays, short stories, poems, plays, and novels by such authors as Echeverría, Sarmiento, Gorriti, Mansilla, Hernández, Barrett, Quiroga, Borges, Ocampo, Cortázar, Walsh, Piglia, Gambaro, Pizarnik, Kohan and Fogwill. Films may include works directed by Bechis, Bielinsky, Caetano, Carri and Santiago. There will also be short critical and contextual readings.
    Evaluation will be based on class participation, short written assignments, a presentation and a final research project.

    This course is taught in Spanish and carries CASE A & H credit.
    HISP-S 480   #30706    11:15A-12:30P    TR   BH 237   Prof. Patrick Dove
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors, #30715.


    HISP-S 494    Individual Readings in Hispanic Studies  (1-3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  Consent of the department.  Permission required, call (812) 855-8612.

    This course is by authorization only.  This course is used only in emergencies pertaining to graduating seniors who are short credit hours for graduation.  This course may be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.  It may not be used as one of the course requirements for the major or minor.

    HISP-S 494      #5096     By Permission Only      Arranged       Prof. Alejandro Mejías-López

    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors  (3 credits)             LITERATURE
    Variable Title:  Survey of Spanish Literature
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    This course studies representative Spanish texts from the Middle Ages to the Golden Age (XII-XVII centuries).  We will read and discuss early poetry, theater and prose, observing how classic characters, such as the knight, the go-between, and the rogue; and overarching themes like love and war, tolerance and intolerance, are developed and reinterpreted in different cultural and historical contexts. 

    This course carries COLLEGE CASE A & H credit.

    HISP-S 498   #13150  PERM     2:30P-3:45P  TR    BH 138    Prof. Ryan Giles
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 407 Survey of Spanish Literature 1.
    Note:  Departmental Permission Required.  Call Undergraduate office (812) 855-8612


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)              CULTURE
    Variable Title:  SPAIN:  The Cultural Context
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S324 or a 300-level Spanish literature course

    1992 marked a year of renewed global recognition for Spain.  As the country celebrated the Quincentennial of Columbus’ voyage and the dawn of the Spanish Empire, it also hosted both the 1992 Olympics (Barcelona) and the World Expo (Seville), and received the title of Cultural Capital of Europe (Madrid).  Taking these cultural events as our focal point for understanding Spain’s emergence from Franco’s dictatorship, along with its current economic and social challenges, popularly known as “La Crisis,” this course will analyze a wide variety of verbal and visual texts to access the interplay of history, memory, and the development of cultural identities within a contemporary global framework. 

    HISP-S 498  #13166    (1st 8 Weeks)  1:00P-2:15P   MTWR    BH 240    Prof. Kathleen Myers
    Note:  This class is 1st Eight Weeks session only!
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 411 SPAIN: The Cultural Context.
    Note:  This course carries CASE A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit and CASE GCC, Global Civilizations and Culture credit.
    Note:  Departmental Permission Required.  Call Undergraduate office (812) 855-8612


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)             CULTURE
    Variable Title: Spanish America:  The Cultural Context
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 324 or a 300-level Spanish literature course

    This course examines the representation of Latin America as a distinct cultural entity. It explores the ways in which the region and its inhabitants were first depicted following Columbus’s "discovery" of the continent, and it offers a critical reflection of some of the major cultural concepts that continue to be used to define it, including notions of mestizaje, hybridity, and transculturation. Through the analysis and discussion of visual culture, music, literature and film students will develop their understanding of Latin American culture, and they will reflect on the cultural politics of representation. Evaluation will be based on active participation in class discussions, homework and quizzes, compositions, and exams.

    HISP-S 498  #32504  2:30P-3:45P  TR   BH 209  Professor Olimpia Rosenthal

    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 412  Spanish American: The Cultural Context
    Note:  Departmental Permission Required.  Call Undergraduate office (812) 855-8612


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)              LITERATUE
    Variable Title:  Modern Spanish Prose Fiction
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    Contesting Repression: 20th Century Spanish Fiction (1939-1990)

    With the fascist triumph in the Spanish Civil War and the installation of the Franco Regime, Spain began one of the most complex periods of its history. The experiences of the war itself and the repressive dictatorship have been determining factors in Spain’s cultural production through most of the twentieth century.  Ultimately permeating society, their effects have lingered on long after the country’s transition to democracy was well under way in the 1980s.  This course will analyze twentieth-century Spanish cultural production within the frame of repression and resistance, looking at ways intellectuals have configured and contested forces of constraint.

    The first section of the course aims to explore how artists both represented and contested repression and the totalitarian state from within the system itself (1939-1975).  How can those within position themselves in order to contemplate and resist a system that labels and combats both of these very acts as subversive?  We will explore the kinds of spaces writers created that allowed them room for maneuver and within which they could both struggle with authority and speak of the experience as a subject of totalitarianism. The second section of the course examines the idea of contesting in terms of “response” as the country underwent a transition to democracy and moved beyond the Franco regime (1975-1990).  Here, we will look at the way these texts respond to the Franco era as an apparently past event, both reexamining that experience, and voicing a preoccupation with self-construction and defining the emergent nation. 

    Taking the political frame of repression as a point of departure, we will also move beyond to consider repression more broadly and its implications in different contexts.  Some of the issues we will discuss in our readings are (self)censorship, exile, notions of gender and sexuality, memory, the power of writing/storytelling, and identity construction.

    Class discussions and assignments will be in Spanish.  Evaluation will likely be based on a combination of active participation, oral presentations, and analytical essays.

    This course carries COLLEGE CASE A & H credit.

    HISP-S 498  #306522  9:30A-10:45A  MW  BH 219 Professor Melissa Dinverno
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 419 Modern Spanish Prose Fiction.
    Note:  Departmental Permission Required.  Call Undergraduate office (812) 855-8612


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)          LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title: Spanish Phonetics
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or equivalent

    This course studies the sound system of Spanish.  Topics include the articulatory system, the characteristics and description of Spanish sounds, the patterns of Spanish sounds, the historical development of modern Spanish from Latin, and the variation within the Spanish sound system.  Attention will also be given to differences between Spanish and English sounds.  A secondary goal of the course is to develop a more native-like pronunciation as a result of a deeper understanding of how the Spanish sound system works.    Course evaluation is based on homework assignments, data analysis, a class project and presentation, and two exams.

    This course carries COLLEGE CASE N & M credit.

    HISP-S 498  #13182   4:00P-5:15P   TR   BH 108 (lab)  Professor Erik Willis
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 425 Spanish Phonetics.
    Note:  Departmental Permission Required.  Call Undergraduate office (812) 855-8612


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)            LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title: The Structure of Spanish
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or equivalent

    This course is an introduction to the grammatical structure of Spanish, with particular attention to the structure of morphology (word formation) and syntax (sentence formation). It will examine the grammatical properties of nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, and the pronominal system of Spanish. It will then look at the principles that govern the internal structure of simple and complex sentences from both a syntactic and pragmatic perspective. Some of the topics that will be examined in this course include word order, negation, tense/aspect/ mood, speech act verbs, and semantic / pragmatic meaning. The course will end with an overview of syntactic cross-linguistic variation across varieties of Spanish in Spain and Latin America.

    This course carries CASE N & M credit.

    HISP-S 498  #13161  9:30A-10:45A   TR  WH 109  Prof. César Félix-Brasdefer
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 427 The Structure of Spanish.
    Note:  Departmental Permission Required.  Call Undergraduate office (812) 855-8612


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)         LINGUISTICS
    Variable Title:  Pragmatics:  Language Use in Context
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or equivalent

    The objective of this course is to examine language use in context (pragmatics) and sociolinguistic variation in different varieties of Spanish. The first part of the course covers the foundational concepts of pragmatics: meaning, context, speech acts, reference, politeness/impoliteness, and key notions in discourse analysis. This course will look at grammatical concepts (conditional, subjunctive, negation, preterit/imperfect, word order, etc.) from a pragmatic perspective using data from native and non-native speakers. The second part of the course applies these notions to pragmatic and sociolinguistic variation by examining the effect of social factors (e.g. region, age, social class) on communicative language use. In this course we will analyze natural data in face-to-face interaction and from study abroad contexts in different regions of the Spanish-speaking world.

    This course carries COLLEGE CASE N & M credit.

    HISP-S 498  #13187    11:15A-12:30P   TR   BH 332  Prof. César Félix-Brasdefer
    Note:  This course may be repeated with a different topic, Sociolinguistics or Pragmatics
    Note:  This course meets with HISP-S 429 Hispanic Sociolinguistics and Pragmatics, VT: Pragmatics: Language Use in Context.
    Note:  Departmental Permission Required.  Call Undergraduate office (812) 855-8612


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)         LITERATURE
    Variable Title: Spanish American Literature 2
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

     

     

     

     

    This course carries CASE A & H credit.

    HISP- S 498     #13831     4:00P-5:15P    MW    BH 134   Professor Alejandro Mejías-López
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 472, Spanish American Literature 2.
    Note:  Departmental Permission Required.  Call Undergraduate office (812) 855-8612


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)      LITERATURE
    Variable Title: Hispanic Literature & Society
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    Cultural Memory and Negotiating the Past in Contemporary Spain

    Theories of cultural memory, trauma and the narration of the past have come to occupy a crucial place in literary studies, and, in the past 20 years, in Hispanic literary studies in particular.  As traumatic local and global current and past events are broadcast widely through television, film, newspapers, and literature, for example, we continue to struggle with both how to narrate them, as well as the profound implications that our narrative choices have for ourselves and others.  Increasingly over the past 15 years, debates on cultural memory, traumatic experience and the narration of the past have taken on a particular urgency in Spanish society and has been at the forefront of Spanish politics and cultural production.

    Focusing primarily on novels written since 1995, this course will study culture’s role in memory construction and the way that writers have dealt with issues of memory, history and the collective negotiation of Spain’s difficult and contentious past of civil war and dictatorship. Some of the questions we will deal with will likely include:  What role does culture, and especially literature, play in a society’s construction of the past and the way it deals with conflict in the present?  How should Spain’s past of Civil War and dictatorial repression be narrated in contemporary society?  How has literature been used to deal with what has been called collective trauma in relation to the Civil War and Francoism?  What place do the ghosts of the past have in the formation of a “new” national identity, in a politics of reconciliation, in a new cultural landscape?  How does Spain’s painful past affect younger generations who never experienced it, and what role does culture play in their experience?  To what degree do writers and directors question the limits of literature and film in representing the past?

    Class discussions and assignments will be in Spanish.  Evaluation will likely be based on a combination of active participation, oral presentations, and analytical essays.

    This course carries CASE A & H credit.

    HISP- S 498  #30695  11:15A-12:30P   MW   SB 220  Professor Melissa Dinverno
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 474, Hispanic Literature & Society
    Note:  Departmental Permission Required.  Call Undergraduate office (812) 855-8612


    HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)             LITERATURE
    Variable Title: Argentine Literature
    Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328; HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 326; one additional 300-level Spanish course.

    This course provides an in-depth exploration of Argentine literature and culture from the early 19th century through the present. We will look at how key literary works in the Argentine tradition respond to—while also seeking to intervene in—social conflicts and social transformations beginning with the post-independence civil wars up through the brutal military dictatorship of the 1970s and the economic crisis of the end of the millennium. Key events in Southern Cone social history that will be discussed include civil war, nation-building, modernization, genocidal wars against Argentina’s indigenous groups, immigration, populism, socialist revolution and militancy, dictatorship and state terrorism, and globalization and the debates over privatization. We will also explore how Argentine writers have contributed to the evolution of a regional tradition that, rather than adhering strictly to national borders, ascribes to a broader and less clearly defined geographical zone along the Río de la Plata basin. This area includes northern Argentina and Uruguay as well as parts of Paraguay and Brazil, and is defined socially by phenomena including the devastating War of the Triple Alliance (1864-70) as well as by large waves of migration and legal and illegal immigration in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
    Primary texts will include essays, short stories, poems, plays, and novels by such authors as Echeverría, Sarmiento, Gorriti, Mansilla, Hernández, Barrett, Quiroga, Borges, Ocampo, Cortázar, Walsh, Piglia, Gambaro, Pizarnik, Kohan and Fogwill. Films may include works directed by Bechis, Bielinsky, Caetano, Carri and Santiago. There will also be short critical and contextual readings.
    Evaluation will be based on class participation, short written assignments, a presentation and a final research project.

    This course is taught in Spanish and carries CASE A & H credit.
    HISP-S 498    #30715    11:15A-12:30P   TR   BH237   Professor Patrick Dove
    Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 480, Argentine Literature.
    Note:  Departmental Permission Required.  Call Undergraduate office (812) 855-8612


    HISP-S 499  Honors Research in Spanish (1 -3 credits)
    Prerequisite:  Approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.   
    BY PERMISSION ONLY.  Call (812) 855-8612
    Majors doing honors in Spanish would register for this class after they have completed S498 and while they are writing their honors thesis.  Contact Karla Allgood via email at kallgood@indiana.edu or see in person in GA 2169 for permission arrangements.

    HISP-S 499    #5097   By Permission Only  Arranged   Professor Alejandro Mejías-López
    Note:  Departmental Permission Required.

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