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Indiana University Bloomington

MA Curriculum

General Requirements

The graduate master’s degree program in speech-language pathology is a five semester-long curriculum (54-60 semester credit hours total) accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Over the course of four semesters, graduate speech-language pathology students take 34 credit hours of required graduate-level academic coursework and 4-8 credit hours of electives or 2-6 thesis credit hours. Graduate students also enroll in clinical practicum (Clinical Methods and Practices) each semester for an additional 4-6 credit hours. In the final semester, graduate students complete two off-campus externships—one in the schools and one in a medical setting for a total of 12 credits. The graduate speech-language pathology curriculum content and sequence is revealed in the table below.

Curriculum

Fall I

Credit Hours

S501 - Biological Foundations of Speech and Hearing

3

S520 - Phonological Disorders

3

S532 - Language Disorders in Children

3

S561 - Clinical Methods and Practices

1

S580 - Critical Thinking about Research in Communication Disorders

3

Total

13

Spring I

S537 - Aphasia

3

S540 - Voice Disorders

3

S550 - Stuttering

3

S561 - Clinical Methods and Practices

1

M463 - Methods in Speech & Hearing Therapy

3

Total

13

Summer I

S544 - Dysphagia

3

S561 - Clinical Methods & Practices

1

1 or 2 Electives OR Thesis

2-4

Total

6-8

Fall II

S531 - Cognitive-Communication Disorders in Brain Injury and Disease

3

S555 - Motor Speech Disorders

4

S561 - Clinical Methods and Practices

1-3

1 or 2 Electives OR Thesis

2-4

Total

10-14

Spring II

S563 - Medical Externship

6

M550 - Practicum: Speech and Hearing (school externship)

6

Total

12

Course Descriptions

S501 – Biological Foundations of Speech and Hearing (3 cr.). This course will introduce students to the anatomical and physiological bases of human communication. Topics will include neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the central and peripheral nervous systems; neural substrates of speech and language; respiratory, phonatory, articulatory, and swallowing physiology; and current theories of motor control.

S520 – Phonological Disorders (3 cr.). Assessment and treatment of phonological disorders in children; procedures are equally applicable to other populations. Case-based approach to analyses of phonetic, phonemic, syllabic structure in clinical diagnosis and identification of treatment goals. Corresponding treatment methods are evaluated relative to evidence-based practice.

S531Cognitive-Communication Disorders in Brain Injury and Disease (3 cr.). This course reviews disorders of perception, cognition, communication, and behavior associated with brain injury and disease in adults. Procedures and issues pertaining to assessment and treatment in the acute and chronic stages of recovery or across disease progression will also be addressed.

S532 – Language Disorders in Children (3 cr.). The focus of this course will be on the identification, etiology, and clinical treatment of children who are classified having autism spectrum disorder, mental retardation, specific language impairment, and other language disorders. 

S537 – Aphasia (3 cr.). In-depth study of diagnosis and management of adult aphasia and related disorders.

S540 – Voice Disorders (3 cr.). This course focuses on facilitating clinical skills related to assessment and management of children and adults with voice disorders. The relevant anatomy and physiology of the vocal mechanism and voice production will be presented. Pathophysiology, causes, prevention, assessment, treatment (behavioral, surgical, and medical) of various voice disorders will be addressed.

S544 – Dysphagia (3 cr.). This course focuses on facilitating clinical skills related to assessment and management of dysphagia in children and adults, including those with tracheostomy and ventilator-dependent. The relevant anatomy and physiology of the swallowing mechanism will be discussed. Pathophysiology, causes, assessment, treatment of various conditions resulting in dysphagia will be addressed.

S550 – Stuttering (3 cr.). This course will focus on the nature and etiology of developmental stuttering, diagnostic procedures, and approaches to treatment in children and adults. Other disorders of fluency, such as acquired stuttering and cluttering, will also be discussed.

S555 – Motor Speech Disorders (4 cr.). This course will focus on the basic correlates of motor speech disorders in children and adults. Normal development, anatomy, and physiology of the speech production mechanism will be reviewed. Characteristics, pathophysiology, etiology, assessment, and treatment of various motor speech disorders will also be addressed.

S561 – Clinical Methods and Practices (1-3 cr.). Current topics related to clinical practice in speech/language pathology.

S563 – Medical Externship (6 cr.). Intensive participation in the clinical activities of community agencies, hospitals or other service providers. Available only to advanced students in clinical program. 

S580 – Critical Thinking about Research in Communication Disorders (3 cr.). This course will provide students with the tools and skills to think critically, solve problems, and make ethical and responsible decisions about clinical assessment and treatment. Emphasis will be placed on the role of research in evidence-based practice and the interpretation of scientific literature.

S780M.A. Thesis (1-6 cr.).

EDUC-M 463 – Methods in Speech and Hearing Therapy (3 cr.). Emphasis on school organizational patterns and administrative policies; relevant federal and state legislation; caseload determination; and service delivery models.

EDUC M550 – Practicum: Speech and Hearing (6 cr.). Teaching or experience in an accredited school, normally in Indiana. Credit will be commensurate with time spent in the instructional setting.