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TITLE INDEX, G-M

The titles of journal articles, review articles, research notes, and responses are alphabetically indexed according to the first major word in each title.

Gender as social practice: Implications for second language acquisition. S. Ehrlich. 19 (3). (1997). 421-446.

Generalizability and automaticity of second language learning under implicit, incidental, enhanced, and instructed conditions. P. Robsinson. 19 (2). (1997). 223-247.

Getting the subtle distinctions: Should versus had better (Research Note). R. Altman. 8 (1). (1986). 80-87.

Grammaticality judgments: Why does anyone object to subject extraction? J. Schachter & V. Yip. 12 (4). (1990). 379-392.

Grammaticality judgments and second language acquisition. R. Ellis. 13 (2). (1991). 161-186.

Grammaticalization in second language acquisition (Introduction to thematic issue). N. Dittmar. 14 (3). (1992). 249-257.

Grammaticalization processes in the area of temporal and modal relations. A. G. Ramat. 14 (3). (1992). 297-322.

How do learners perceive interactional feedback? A. Mackey, S. Gass, & K. McDonough. 22 (4). (2000). 471-497.

Identity markers and L2 pronunciation. J. Zuengler. 10 (1). (1988). 33-49.

Immersion education: Applicability for nonvernacular teaching to vernacular speakers. M. Swain. 4 (1). (1981). 1-17.

Immigrant children in infant-class interactions: Opportunities for second language acquisition of young multilingual children in Dutch infant classes. R. Damhuis. 15 (3). (1993). 305-331.

Implicit and explicit processes: Commentary. B. MacWhinney. 19 (2). 277-280.

In search of systematicity in interlanguage production. J. Schachter. 8 (2). (1986). 119-133.

The incidental acquisition of Spanish: Future tense morphology through reading in a second language. J. F. Lee. 24 (1). (2002). 55-80.

Incidental focus on form and second language learning. S. Loewen. 27 (3). (2005). 361-386.

Incidental vocabulary acquisition from oral and written dialogue journals. C. Brown, S. L. Sagers, & C. LaPorte. 21 (2). (1999). 259-283.

Incidental vocabulary acquisition in a second language: A review. T. Huckin & J. Coady. 21 (2). (1999). 181-193.

Incidental vocabulary acquisition in the foreing language classroom. H. Wode. 21 (2). (1999). 243-258.

Incipient creolization in Gastarbeiterdeutsch?: An experimental sociolinguistic study. C. W. Pfaff. 3 (2). (1981). 165-178.

Individual differences in second language learning. P. Skehan. 13 (2). (1991). 275-298.

Input enhancement in instructed SLA: Theoretical bases. M. A. Sharwood Smith. 15 (2). (1993). 165-179.

Input in an institutional setting. K. Bardovi-Harlig & B. S. Hartford. 18 (2). (1996). 171-188.

Input, intake, and retention: Effects of increased processing on incidental learning of foreign language vocabulary. Y. Watanabe. 19 (3). (1997). 287-307.

Input, interaction, and second language development: An empirical study of question formation in ESL. A. Mackey. 21 (4). (1999). 557-587.

Input, interaction, and second language production. S. M. Gass & E. M. Varonis. 16 (3). (1994). 283-302.

Input-driven language learning. (Peer commentary). M. Harrington & S. Dennis. 24 (2). (2002). 261-268.

Instance theory and second language rule learning under explicit conditions. P. J. Robinson & M. A. Ha. 15 (4). (1993). 413-438.

Instruction and the development of questions in L2 classrooms. N. Spada & P. M. Lightbown. 15 (2). (1993). 205-224.

Instructional strategies and SLA in early French immersion. B. Harley. 15 (2). (1993). 245-259.

An instrumental motivation in language study: Who says it isn't effective? R. C. Gardner & P. D. MacIntyre. 13 (1). (1991). 57-72.

An instrumental study of vowel reduction and stress placement in Spanish-accented English. J. E. Flege & O.-S. Bohn. 11 (1). (1989). 35-62.

Intake: On models and methods for discovering learners' processing of input. C. Chaudron. 7 (1). (1985). 1-14.

Integrative motivation, induced anxiety, and language learning in a controlled environment. R. C. Gardner, J. B. Day, & P. D. MacIntyre. 14 (2). (1992). 197-214.

The interaction between type of contact and type of instruction: Some effects on the L2 proficiency of adult learners. N. Spada. 8 (2). (1986). 181-199.

An interactionist approach to L2 sentence interpretation. S. M. Gass. 8 (1). (1986). 19-37.

The interaction of instruction and learner-internal factors in the acquisition of L2 morphosyntax. P. D. Toth. 22 (2). (2000). 169-208.

Intercultural differences and communicative approaches to foreign language teaching in the Third World. K.-H. Osterloh. 3 (1). (1980). 64-70.

Interlanguage variability in narrative discourse: Style shifting in the use of the past tense. R. Ellis. 9 (1). (1987). 1-19.

Interlangue intonative et fossilisation (Research Note). D. Lepetit. 7 (3). (1985). 308-322.

The interpretation of English reflexive pronouns by nonnative speakers. M. Thomas. 11 (3). (1989). 281-303.

Interrogative chunks in French L2: A basis for creative construction? F. Myles, R. Mitchell, & J. Hooper. 21 (1). (1999). 49-80.

Intonation and language learning: The necessity for an integrative approach. C. Gutknecht. 1 (2). (1978). 25-36.

Introducing (applied) linguists to statistics: A review of two books and some general remarks (Review Article). R. Grotjahn. 10 (1). (1988). 63-68.

Introduction (Introduction to thematic issue). S. Montrul. 23 (2). (2001). 145-151.

Introduction (Introduction to thematic issue). A. Valdman. 24 (2). (2002). 141-142. 

Introduction (Introduction to thematic issue). S. Kouwenberg & P. L. Patrick 25 (2). (2003). 175-184.

Introduction: Interlanguage pragmatics in SLA (Introduction to thematic issue). G. Kasper. 18 (2). (1996). 145-148.

Introduction: Organizing principles of learner varieties. C. Perdue. 22 (3). (2000). 299-305.

Introductions to linguistics for second language acquisition specialists (Review Article). K. Bardovi-Harlig. 9 (1). (1987). 103-107.

Invitations and negative questions: On some problems in the communicative approach to foreign language teaching. W. Hüllen. 3 (1). (1980). 17-25.

Is second language attrition the reversal of second language acquisition? E. Olshtain. 11 (2). (1989). 151-165.

The issue of grammaticalization in early German second language. C. W. Pfaff. 14 (3). (1992). 273-296.

Japanese adult learners' development of the locality condition on English reflexives. Y. Akiyama. 24 (1). (2002). 27-54.

Japanese learners' acquisition of the locality requirement of English reflexives: Evidence for retreat from overgeneralization. M. Matsumura. 16 (1). (1994). 19-42.

Knowledge of English word stress patterns in early and late Korean-English bilinguals. S. G. Guion. 27 (4). (2005). 503-533.

L2 acquisition and obligatory head movement: English-speaking learners of German and the Local Impairment Hypothesis. M.-L. Beck. 20 (3). (1998). 311-349.

L2 acquisition of Japanese unaccusative verbs. M. Hirakawa. 23 (2). (2001). 221-245.

L2 working memory capacity and L2 reading skill. M. Harrington & M. Sawyer. 14 (1). (1992). 25-38.

Language acquisition, pidgins and creoles. H. Wode. 3 (2). (1981). 193-200.

Language acquisition research and the language teacher. B. J. Gadalla. 4 (1). (1981). 60-69.

Language and brain. A. Ellegard. 1 (2). (1978). 129-150.

Language aptitude and second language proficiency in classroom learners of different starting ages. B. Harley & D. Hart. 19 (3). (1997). 379-400.

Language attrition research: An introduction (Introduction to thematic issue). B. Weltens & A. D. Cohen. 11 (2). (1989). 127-133.

The language contact profile. B. F. Freed, D. P. Dewey, N. Segalowitz, & R. Halter. 26 (2). (2004). 349-356.

Language distance and the magnitude of the language learning task. S. P. Corder. 2 (1). (1979). 27-36.

Language lateralization in adult bilinguals. M. B. Wesche & E. I. Schneiderman. 4 (2). (1982). 153-169.

Language learning through interaction: What role does gender play? T. Pica, L. Holliday, N. Lewis, D. Berducci, & J. Newman. 13 (3). (1991). 343-376.

Language reversion revisited. K. de Bot & M. Clyne. 11 (2). (1989). 167-177.

Language revival: Specifics and generalities (Review Article). J. Edwards. 15 (1). (1993). 107-113.

Language transfer and discourse universals in Indian English article use. D. Sharma. 27 (4). (2005). 535-566.

Learnability and the acquisition of extraction in relative clauses and WH-questions. K. W. Quintero. 14 (1). (1992). 39-70.

Learner feedback and its effects on communication tasks: A pilot study. S. J. Gaies. 4 (1). (1981). 46-59.

Learner-centered communicative language teaching: Needs analysis revisited. H. Holec. 3 (1). (1980). 26-33.

Learners' hypotheses for the acquisition of lexis. J. Giacobbe & M.-A. Cammarota. 8 (3). (1986). 327-342.

Learning context and its effects on second language acquisition: Introduction. J. Collentine & B. F. Freed. 26 (2). (2004). 153-171.

The learning of sociolinguistic variation by advanced FSL learners: The case of nous versus on in immersion French. K. Rehner, R. Mougeon, & T. Nadasdi. 25 (1). (2003). 127-156.

Learning second language grammar rules: An experiment with a miniature linguistic system. R. M. DeKeyser. 17 (3). (1995). 379-410.

Learning simple and complex second language rules under implicit, incidental, rule-search, and instructed conditions. P. Robinson. 18 (1). (1996). 27-67.

Learning to communicate in the classroom: A study of two language learners' requests. R. Ellis. 14 (1). (1992). 1-23.

Learning the rules of academic talk: A longitudinal study of pragmatic change. K. Bardovi-Harlig & B. S. Hartford. 15 (3). (1993). 279-304.

Lecture et linéarité. D. Coste. 1 (1). (1978). 135-146.

Let’s make up your mind: “Special nativist” perspectives on language, modularity of mind, and nonnative language acquisition. (Point and Counterpoint). B. D. Schwartz. 21 (4) (1999). 635-656.

Lexical constraints on syntactic acquisition. J. Ard & S. M. Gass. 9 (2). (1987). 233-252.

Lexical constraints on the acquisition of split intransitivity: Evidence from L2 Japanese. A. Sorace & Y. Shomura. 23 (2). (2001). 247-278.

Lexical factors and segmental accuracy in second language speech production. J. E. Flege, E. M. Frieda, A. C. Walley, & L. A. Randazza. 20 (2). (1998). 155-187.

Lexical processing strategy use and vocabulary learning through reading. C. A. Fraser. 21 (2). (1999). 225-241.

Lexical simplification in second language acquisition. S. Blum & E. A. Levenston. 2 (2). (1979). 43-63.

Lexical-grammatical pragmatic indicators. S. Blum-Kulka & E. A. Levenston. 9 (2). 155-170.

Lexical units and the learning of foreign language vocabulary. P. Bogaards. 23 (3). (2001). 321-343.

Linguistic and conversational adjustments to nonnative speakers. M. H. Long. 5 (2). (1983). 177-193.

Linguistic aspects of regression in German case marking. P. Jordens, K. de Bot, & H. Trapman. 11 (2). (1989). 179-204.

Linguistic input and conversational strategies in L1 and L2. B. McLaughlin. 2 (2). (1979). 1-16.

Linguistic systems and linguistic change in an interlanguage. T. Huebner. 6 (1). (1983). 33-53.

Linguistic theory: Contributions to second language acquisition (Review Article). W. C. Ritchie. 13 (1). (1991). 77-85.

The long-term retention of French by Dutch students. B. Weltens, T. J. M. van Els, E. Schils. 11 (2). (1989). 205-216.

The loss of language skills, R. D. Lambert & B. Freed (Review Article). T. Raffaldini. 6 (1). (1983). 94-100.

Making sense: Interlanguage's intertalk in exolingual conversation. B. Py. 8 (3). (1986). 343-353.

Marking sense of frequency. (Peer commentary). D. Larsen-Freeman. 24 (2). (2002). 275-285.

Markedness and the acquisition of referential forms: The case of zero anaphora (Replication study). C. Muñoz. 17 (4). (1995). 517-527.

Markedness and second language acquisition: The question of transfer. L. White. 9 (3). (1987). 261-285.

Markedness, discoursal modes, and relative clause formation in a formal and an informal context. M. Pavesi. 8 (1). (1986). 38-55.

Markedness universals and the acquisition of voicing contrasts in Korean speakers of English. R. C. Major & M. C. Faudree. 18 (1). (1996). 69-90.

Maturational constraints on language development (State of the Art). M. H. Long. 12 (3). (1990). 251-285.

Measuring relative cue weighting: A reply to Morrison. (Response). P. Boersma & P. Escudero. 27 (4). (2005). 607-617.

Memory, attention, and inductive learning. J. N. Williams. 21 (1). (1999). 1-48.

Meta talk in FL classroom discourse. C. Faerch. 7 (2). (1985). 184-199.

Metadiscursive processes in the acquisition of a second language. A. Giacomi & R. Vion. 8 (3). (1986). 355-368.

Methods in second language research (Introduction to thematic issue). G. Kasper & R. Grotjahn. 13 (2). (1991). 109-112.

Methods in second language classroom-oriented research: A critical review. D. Nunan. 13 (2). (1991). 249-274.

Methods of morpheme quantification: Their effect on the interpretation of second language data (Research Note). T. Pica. 6 (1). (1983). 69-78.

Mimicry of nondistinctive phonetic differences between language varieties. J. E. Flege & R. M. Hammond. 5 (1). (1982). 1-17.

Modality and attention to meaning and form in the input. W. Wong. 23 (3). (2001). 345-368.

Modality and intake in second language acquisition (Replication study). R. P. Leow. 17 (1). (1995). 79-89.

Modality and referential movement in instructional discourse: Comparing the production of Italian learners of German with native German and native Italian production. B. Ahrenholz. 22 (3). 337-368.

Modeling perceptions of the accentedness and comprehensibility of L2 speech: The role of speaking rate. M. J. Munro & T. M. Derwing. 23 (4). (2001). 451-468.

Models, attention, and awareness in SLA: A response to Simard and Wong's "Alertness, orientation, and detection: The conceptualization of attentional fuctions in SLA" (SSLA, 23, 103-124). (Response). R. P. Leow. 24 (1). (2002). 113-119.

Modified input as an aid to comprehension (Research Note). K. Kelch. 7 (1). (1985). 81-90.

The Monitor Model and neurofunctional theory: An integrated view. J. W. Tollefson, B. Jacobs, & E. J. Selipsky. 6 (1). (1983). 1-16.

Morphological and syntactic transfer in child L2 acquisition of the English dative alternation. M. Whong-Barr & B. D. Schwartz. 24 (4). (2002). 579-616.

Morphological type, spatial reference, and language transfer. S. Jarvis & T. Odlin. 22 (4). (2000). 535-556.

Morphology and longer distance dependencies: Laboratory research illuminating the A in SLA. N. C. Ellis & R. Schmidt. 19 (2). (1997). 145-171.

Mother and other tongue influence on learner French: A case study. D. Singleton. 9 (3). (1987). 327-345.

Motion verbs with goal PPs in the L2 acquisition of English and Japanese. S. Inagaki. 23 (2). (2001). 153-170.

The multidimensional model, linguistic profiling, and related issues: A reply to Hudson. (Response). M. Pienemann, M. Johnston, & J. Meisel. 15 (4). (1993). 495-503.

A multiple word association probe in second language acquisition research. H. Kruse, J. Pankhurst, & M. A. Sharwood Smith. 9 (2). (1987). 141-154.