Great Decisions

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Description:

Description: Great Decisions is the nation's oldest, most popular program of citizen education in world affairs. The common purpose is to help members become informed, involved, and to understand how world events affect their daily lives. The University Women's Club in cooperation with the Foreign Policy Association, IU's Center for the Study of Global Change will offer the following programs for Uclub members in in the Terrace Room at Meadowood at 1:15 p.m. on the 2nd Tuesday of the month (September through May).

Co-Chairs:
Donna Smith    Phone: 812.331.0311    Email: vhsmith@indiana.edu
Mike Chiappetta    Phone: 812.337.1884     Email: mchiappe@indiana.edu

 GTREAT DECISIONS TOPICS FOR 2014
 GTREAT DECISIONS TOPICS FOR 2013
 GREAT DECISIONS TOPICS FOR 2012
  GREAT DECISIONS TOPICS FOR 2011
  GREAT DECISIONS TOPICS FOR 2010
  GREAT DECISIONS TOPICS FOR 2009
  GREAT DECISIONS TOPICS FOR 2008

Past Program Topics with videos

Visit the FPA web site: Foreign Policy Association

http://www.facebook.com/GreatDecisions

Become a fan of Great Decisions on Facebook. Stay up to date with program updates and news on current Great Decisions topics.

Our mission is to educate Americans about significant issues that have an impact on our lives.






2014  Topics

  • September 9 -   Turkey's Challenges
    By Lenore Martin

    Turkey: a nation at a crossroads, a bridge over an ever-growing chasm between the East and West. Turkey's first Prime Minister Kemal Ataturk envisioned a modern, democratic nation-state built on the ashes of the Ottoman Empire with strong ties to Europe, not the Middle East. But as the clashes between secular and religious groups and the recent protests in Taksim Square show, the soul of Turkey is still very much up for grabs.By Lenore Martin


  • October 14 -   US Trade Policy
    By Michael O. Moore and Robert Maxim

    America's foreign policy tools are not limited to sanctions, treaties or military campaigns - they also include the sales pitch. The logic behind this pitch, or "economic statecraft," is simple: promote the benefits of democracy and the free market. In so doing, the U.S. will gain valuable and stable partners, both in business and in diplomacy. Now, as China and other emerging nations battle the U.S. for global influence, Secretary Kerry will take the reigns as a free market matchmaker.


  • November 11 -  Energy Independence
    By Jonathan Chanis

    Energy independence, by taking the bargaining chip of oil dependence off the table, would be good for American foreign policy. But the very technological advances that make independence possible have created a dilemma for lawmakers. In a government with fixed resources, should the U.S. encourage more traditional fuel production or invest in the young technology of renewable resources?


  • December 2 -   Defense Technology
    By Peter Singer

    From robotic planes to cyberweapons to 3D printing and human enhancement, new "game-changing" technologies are moving from science fiction to battlefield reality - all during an age of fiscal austerity. But in wrestling with the new, we can actually learn a great deal from the past. Our forebears went through similar challenges with such once fanciful but now normal concepts as airplanes, submarines, and tanks. What are the "killer applications" of the 21st century battlefield, and in turn, what are the issues that the U.S. must navigate in adapting to them?


Co-Chairs:
Donna Smith    Phone: 812.331.0311    Email: vhsmith@indiana.edu
Mike Chiappetta    Phone: 812.337.1884     Email: mchiappe@indiana.edu

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