WORKSHOP IN POLITICAL THEORY
   AND POLICY ANALYSIS
   Spring 1997 Colloquia
    http://www.indiana.edu/~workshop/colloquia/materials/spring1997_colloquia.html

Colloquia during Spring 1997:

April 28, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Larry Schroeder, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, will be the guest speaker for the Workshop Colloquium on Monday, April 28.  His presentation is entitled "Analyzing Institutional Arrangements for Rural Infrastructure."An Abstract of his paper is provided below.

April 21, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Barbara Allen, Department of Political Science, Carleton College, Northfield, MN, will be the guest speaker for the Workshop Colloquium on Monday, April 21, 1997. Her presentation is entitled "Federal Liberty and the Art of Association in Tocquevile's Analysis." An abstract of her paper is provided below.

April 14, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Mark Lichbach, Department of Political Science, Colorado University, Boulder, Co, will be the guest speaker for the Workshop Colloquium on Monday, April 14, 1997. His presentation is entitled "The Rebel's Dilemma and the Cooperator's Dilemma: Reflections on the Collective Action Problem." A summary of his presentation is provided below.

April 7, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Michael Mcginnis, Department of Political Science and the Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis, Indiana University, will be the guest speaker for the Workshop Colloquium on Monday, April 7, 1997. His presentation is entitled "Rent-Seeking, Redistribution, and Reform in the Governance of Global Markets." An abstract of his paper is provided below.

March 10, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Toshio Yamagishi, Department of Behavioral Science, Hokkaido University, Sappora, Japan, will be the speaker for the Workshop Colloquium on Monday, March 10, 1997. His presentation in entitled "Trust and Gullibility." An abstract of his paper is provided below.

March 3, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Elmus Wicker, Department of Economics, Indiana University, will be the guest speaker for the Workshop Colloquium on Monday, March 3, 1997. His presentation is entitled "Were Panics of the National Banking Era Preventable?" An abstract of his paper is provided below.

February 24, 1997

Red triangleTony Matejczyk, Doctoral Student, Department of Political Science, Indiana University, will be the guest speaker. His presentation is entitled "Zoning Exceptions in Cities: Politics and Outcomes." An abstract of his paper is provided below.

February 17, 1997

Red triangleNahoko Hayashi, Visiting Scholar, Department of Behavioral Science, Faculty of Letters, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, will be the guest speaker. Her presentation is entitled "Selective Play: Social Embeddedness of Social Dilemmas." An abstract of her paper is provided below.

February 10, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Kerry Krutilla, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, will be the speaker for the Workshop Colloquium on Monday, February 10, 1997. His presentation is entitled "Environmental Policy and Rent Seeking." An abstract of his paper is provided below.

February 3, 1997

Red triangleDoctoral student, Brian Collins, Department of Political Science, Indiana University, will be the speaker. His presentation is entitled "Reducing the Costs of Democracy: Economic Growth in US States, 1983-1992."

January 27, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Elinor Ostrom, Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis, Indiana University, will be the speaker. Her presentation is entitled "Self-Governance of Common-Pool Resources."

January 20, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Burt Monroe, Department of Political Science, Indiana University, will be the guest speaker. His presentation is entitled "Information Aggregation Under Alternative Electoral Systems."


Abstracts

April 28, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Larry Schroeder, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, will be the guest speaker for the Workshop Colloquium on Monday, April 28.  His presentation is entitled "Analyzing Institutional Arrangements for Rural Infrastructure."An Abstract of his paper is provided below.

This paper (after further revision) is to be presented at a World Bank-sponsored Workshop on Rural Infrastructure next month.  The specific focus of the Workshop will be on institutional issues related to the development of rural water supply and rural roads in developing transition economies.  Since few of the participants in the Workshop will have had any formal introduction to analysis of institutional arrangements in the context of rural infrastructure investments, the intent of the paper is to review the concepts of institutional arrangements and the effects that they can have on the sustainability of rural infrastructure investments.
The paper illustrates how institutional arrangements can be crucial to sustaining investments in rural roads and water supply through their effects on the incentives of the long list of actors who generally play a role in rural infrastructure development.  It considers what is meant by institutions and institutional arrangements and how the arrangements affect the costs of providing and producing rural infrastructure.  Finally, the paper posits some general design principals based on both empirical observations and theory.

April 21, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Barbara Allen, Department of Political Science, Carleton College, Northfield, MN, will be the guest speaker for the Workshop Colloquium on Monday, April 21, 1997. Her presentation is entitled "Federal Liberty and the Art of Association in Tocquevile's Analysis." An abstract of her paper is provided below.

Tocqueville's Democracy chronicles the American experiment in self-government in a way that speaks to current scholarship in institutional analysis and development. Through his analysis we learn how institutional change can effect custom, habit, and, eventually, culture and the limitations placed by history and culture. All of the causes that contribute to maintaining a democratic republic in the United States, Tocqueville argued, can be reduced to three points: "1. The peculiar and accidental situation in which Providence has placed the Americans. 2. The laws. 3. The manners and customs of the people."

In the United States, Tocqueville asserted, the framework of the federal government could not be understood without knowing its history, particularly its relationship to the intermediate and antecedent institutions that comprise it.

Political practice determined the relationship of the states to the Union and the status of citizens within each arena of political action. Such political activity ultimately revealed the citizens' views of liberty, equality, duty, and right, as well as the institutions they had designed according to these beliefs.

While voluntary associations played a vital role in America, in other political circumstances self-organization was not such a salutary part of political life. Tocqueville believed that self-organization is a ubiquitous human response and is not necessarily indicative of sustained self-government. Private interests could be a sentinel of public right as James Madison intended, but self-interest could also promote factions, as he feared. Not all associations nurture an understanding of self-interest that is proper to socially responsible public engagement. The two orientations toward equality that Tocqueville identified with democracy produced two types of self-organized institutions: those with a democratic organizational structure and self-governing intentions and those whose structure was hierarchical and purpose was domination.

April 14, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Mark Lichbach, Department of Political Science, Colorado University, Boulder, Co, will be the guest speaker for the Workshop Colloquium on Monday, April 14, 1997. His presentation is entitled "The Rebel's Dilemma and the Cooperator's Dilemma: Reflections on the Collective Action Problem."

Over the past few years, I have published several books and articles that attempt to rationally reconstruct and critically evaluate the Collective Action Research Program (CARP). My rational reconstruction focuses on a typology -- Market, Community, Contract, and Hierarchy -- of the two dozen or more sets of solutions that have been proposed to the CA problem. My critical evaluation concentrates on a series of implications -- such as a Rikerian interpretation of CARP and the need to evaluate CA theories from Lakatosian and Popperian standards -- of this profusion of solutions. The goal of my talk is to stimulate a dialogue with members of the Workshop about our respective approaches to Mancur Olson's seminal problem.
April 7, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Michael Mcginnis, Department of Political Science and the Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis, Indiana University, will be the guest speaker for the Workshop Colloquium on Monday, April 7, 1997. His presentation is entitled "Rent-Seeking, Redistribution, and Reform in the Governance of Global Markets." An abstract of his paper is provided below.

Governance is a set of services and a form of collective action. The basic premise of this paper is that the concept of governance needs to be broken down into its constituent service activities, each of which is provided by individuals or organizations specializing in the production or provision of that particular service. Since governance facilitates the operation of market exchange and other forms of interactions among the "consumers" of these governance services, any effort to arrange for this collective good necessarily confronts dilemmas of collective action. This paper draws on two efforts to systematize the multi-disciplinary literature on collective action. Lichbach (1995, 1996) organizes the full range of "solutions" to collective action dilemmas under four categories of Market, Contract, Hierarchy, and Community. Elsewhere I posit four "realms" of collective action, classifying organizations according to whether their primary activities are economic, coercive, social, or political (McGinnis 1996).

This paper justifies two general conclusions about the nature of governance of global markets. First, different sectors of the global political economy are characterized by different configurations of organizations, even though the same set of basic services are provided, in one manner or another, by the network of governance organizations in that sector. Whatever the configuration of governance, all experience similar tensions, including tendencies towards rent-seeking behavior even if governance services remain minimal. Second, the nature of the market in governance services implies that it is unreasonable to expect organizational forms that minimize transaction costs. This conclusion follows because of (1) the relative difficulty of entry into this market, given the many advantages held by pre-existing service organizations, and (2) some services that enhance adaptability to changing conditions also necessarily increase the costs of transacting. Of particular importance in this regard are the capacity for redistribution of resources and for reform of institutional arrangements.

In sum, those governance organizations that most effectively combine the provision of economic-productive, coercive-protective, and social-communal services are most likely to survive and prosper, since such organizations have a capacity for redistribution and reform that helps them adapt to the changes wrought by globalization.

March 10, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Toshio Yamagishi, Department of Behavioral Science, Hokkaido University, Sappora, Japan, will be the speaker for the Workshop Colloquium on Monday, March 10, 1997. His presentation in entitled "Trust and Gullibility." An abstract of his paper is provided below.

March 3, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Elmus Wicker, Department of Economics, Indiana University, will be the guest speaker for the Workshop Colloquium on Monday, March 3, 1997. His presentation is entitled "Were Panics of the National Banking Era Preventable?" An abstract of his paper is provided below.

February 24, 1997

Red triangleTony Matejczyk, Doctoral Student, Department of Political Science, Indiana University, will be the guest speaker. His presentation is entitled "Zoning Exceptions in Cities: Politics and Outcomes." An abstract of his paper is provided below.

February 17, 1997

Red triangleNahoko Hayashi, Visiting Scholar, Department of Behavioral Science, Faculty of Letters, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, will be the guest speaker. Her presentation is entitled "Selective Play: Social Embeddedness of Social Dilemmas."An abstract of her paper is provided below.

January 20, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Burt Monroe, Department of Political Science, Indiana University, will be the guest speaker. His presentation is entitled "Information Aggregation Under Alternative Electoral Systems." An abstract is provided below.

January 27, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Elinor Ostrom, Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis, Indiana University, will be the speaker. Her presentation is entitled "Self-Governance of Common-Pool Resources." An abstract of her paper is provided below.
Abstract

February 3, 1997

Red triangleDoctoral student, Brian Collins, Department of Political Science, Indiana University, will be the speaker. His presentation is entitled "Reducing the Costs of Democracy: Economic Growth in US States, 1983-1992."
Abstract

February 10, 1997

Red triangleProfessor Kerry Krutilla, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, will be the speaker for the Workshop Colloquium on Monday, February 10, 1997. His presentation is entitled "Environmental Policy and Rent Seeking." An abstract of his paper is provided below.


To request a full text copy of a paper, if it is available, send an email to workshop@indiana.edu, or contact Gayle Higgins at ghiggins@indiana.edu.


Back to the Workshop Homepage
Copyright 1997, Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis
Last updated:  September 24, 1997