Spring 2017

EALC-E 201  Issues in East Asian Literature

Topic: Myths, Dreams, and Fantasies: Korean Literature from Early Times to the Present

Instructor: Susan Hwang

Class meeting times: MW 9:30 – 10:45 AM

Course description: This course examines representative works of Korean literature from ancient times to the present. Our readings will include a diverse array of pre-modern, modern, and contemporary literary works—ranging from foundation myths, love songs composed by courtesans, folktales, modern novels of enlightenment, to contemporary songs of protest. Throughout the course, we will explore the ruptures and continuities in expressions of social justice, political ethics, individuality, love, and sex in the history of Korean literature. We will also be viewing modern-day filmic and television renditions of pre-modern texts to explore how—and to what purpose—foundation myths, as well as pre-modern tropes of dreams and fantasies, are reworked in contemporary Korean culture. All readings will be in English translation. No previous knowledge of Korean history, literature, or culture is required.

EALC-E 204  Issues in East Asian Society

Topic: East Asian Politics: A Comparative Perspective

Instructor: John Yasuda

Class meeting times: T/Th 1:00 -2:15 PM

Course description: This course seeks to examine the politics of China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan as part of a distinct region.  We will seek to understand how individual polities responded to regional developments and trends, such as the tide of colonialism, the wave of socialism, regional economic developments, and movements towards democratization.  All the while, we will seek to explore the idea of East Asia as a region: Are the politics of East Asia distinct from other regions?  Is East Asia following the path of other developing countries more generally?  Do the countries that constitute the region view themselves as part of a region?  


We will seek to understand to what extent concepts such as "contentious politics," "developmental state," "informal institutions," "civil society," "democratic transition," "neo-authoritariansm," and "state capitalism" apply to East Asia, or how they can be tweaked to better capture the socio-political dynamics of the region.  Students who take this course will also develop a deeper understanding of the various policy issues and challenges facing various countries, providing them a lens to better understand contemporary events in East Asian countries, including Xi Jinping's anti-corruption campaign, the push for democracy in Hong Kong, and the rise of abe-nomics in Japan.  

EALC-E 300/ E505 Studies in East Asian Literature

Topic: Korean Popular Culture

Instructor: Susan Hwang

Class meeting times: MW 2:30 – 3:45 PM

Course Description: Korean popular culture—be it K-pop or K-drama or “web-toons”—gained a new momentum over the last two decades, entertaining an unforeseen level of popularity around the globe. What are the technological innovations, sociopolitical changes, and historical forces that account for the enthusiasm for popular culture of South Korea today? What can the South Korean experience of popular culture tell us about the shifts and turns in global cultural experience? This course engages with various forms of popular culture—graphic novels, folk songs, popular music, television, film, digital/internet media, and food—in two nominal ways: one, as a window through which to understand the political/economic structures and value systems that shape the contemporary Korean society, and two, as an active site of cultural production, distribution, and consumption. No previous knowledge of Korean history, literature, or culture is required, but a bit of enthusiasm for pop culture will be necessary! 

EALC-E 305/ E505 Korean Language and Culture/ Topics in East Asian Studies

Instructor: Hyo-Sang Lee

Class meeting times: TTh 2:30 - 3:45 PM

Course description: Language is an important window through which one can understand the culture and society of the people who use it, because people's socio-cultural behaviors and attitudes as well as thoughts and world views are reflected upon their use of the language. We will deal with such topics as greetings, language of emotion and morality, kinship terminology, color terms, sexism and language, language and gender, names and titles, noun classification, luck & taboo words, proverbs and old sayings, sound symbolism, communication styles, politeness, Korean writing system (particularly its cultural background and cultural implication), metaphors, loan words, etc. We will look through the cultural and conceptual as well as philosophical makeup of Korean people, and the structure of Korean society, as reflected by the Korean language.

EALC-E 350 (CIC e-Korea course)

Topic: Two Koreas: Political Economy of Regional Rivalry

Instructor: Youngbae Hwang (Ohio State University)

Class meeting times: TTh 2:20 - 3:40 PM

Course description: The main objective of this course is to provide students with introductory understanding of the Korean peninsula. While we look at various theoretical and historical explanations, this course will focus on the nature of North and South Korean regional rivalry and its global impacts. We will examine various security issues including North Korean nuclear threat, military alliances, and reunification prospects. In addition, we will discuss several economic issues such as the differential growth paths, South Korea’s rapid growth, and recent economic woes in both Koreas.

EALC-E 350 (CIC e-Korea course)

Topic: Introduction to Korean History

Instructor: Charles Kim (University of Wisconsin)

Class meeting times: MW 12:00 -12:50 PM; and either F 10:55 -11:45 AM or F 12:00 -12:50 PM

Course description: Ever since the establishment of two Korean nation-states after the end of World War II, North Korea and South Korea have been part and parcel of key trends and phenomena in East Asia and the world. As such, the post-1945 history of Korea has been shot through with transformations, dynamism, conflicts, triumphs, and, most of all, the unexpected. This course explores the politics, society, and culture of the two Koreas. Key topics include national division and the Korean War, the Cold War, memory, protest, popular culture, and globalization.

EALC-K102 Elementary Korean 2

Instructor: Jiyoung Kim

Course Description: K102 (Elementary Korean 2) is the second part of First Year Korean. The course provides students with further conversational & grammatical skills beyond those learned in the first semester. The objective of the course is to equip students with communicative skills in speaking, reading, and writing with more complex structures in Korean such as various kinds of speakers stance, desire, evaluation, judgement, assessment on the propositional content conveyed, and more complex relations between two events such as cause, reason, purpose, concession, background, condition, etc. Students are expected to be able to command a lengthy narrative discourse, say, on school life, family, vacation plan, hobbies, etc.

EALC-K202 Second Year Korean 2

Instructor: Hyo Sang Lee

Course Description: K202 is the second part of Second Year Korean. The course provides students with further conversational & grammatical skills beyond those learned in the first semester. The objective of the course is to equip students with communicative skills in speaking, reading, and writing with more complex structures in Korean such as various kinds of speakers stances, evaluation, assessment, judgement and attitudes on the events encountered, and more complex relations between two events such as cause, reason, purpose, concession, intention, background, condition, etc. Students are expected to be able to command a lengthy dialogue regarding various topics such as birthday party, hair style and fashion, hobbies, traditional holidays, marriage, jobs, etc.

EALC-K302 Third Year Korean 2

Instructor: Jiyoung Kim

Course Description: This course is a continuation of Third Year Korean. The objective of the course is to have students learn Korean language and culture and enable them to communicate further with advanced communicative skills in Korean, in speaking, reading, and writing, particularly to express various stances/attitudes of the speaker toward the content and the background circumstance of communication. The students are expected to be able to express his or her thoughts dealing with abstract ideas in extended discourse. This course is largely content-based; students will learn about Korean language and culture in Korean, and the students will be tested on the content as well as the language skills they learned in the course. Frequent reading and writing excercises will be asked to do.

EALC-K402 Fourth Year Korean 2

Instructor: Jiyoung Kim

Course Description: This course is a continuation of Fourth Year Korean.We will deal with advanced reading material, mostly from authentic writings in various genres and styles, such as newspaper editorials, columns, essays, movie scenarios, and T.V. news clips, short stories, and other expository and literary writings. Through reading these material, however, students will also learn various aspects of Korean culture and society. You will build your vocabulary and reading proficiency toward the level of the ordinary adult. The students will be tested on the content as well as the language skills they learned in the course.

Photo: Temple Eave / John Finch

Questions?  Email iks@indiana.edu.