Upcoming events

Spring 2018

Institute for Korean Studies Colloquium Series

Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in S. Korea

Hae Yeon Choo (Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto Mississauga)

Made possible with funding from the Academy of Korean Studies

Date: Friday, February 2, 2018

12:00 noon-1:30pm

Location: GISB Room 2067

Professor Hae Yeon Choo’s research centers on gender, transnational migration, and citizenship to examine global social inequality. In her empirical and theoretical work, she employs an intersectional approach to social inequalities, integrating gender, race, and class in her analyses. This approach provided the foundation for an article published in Sociological Theory in 2010 (with Myra Marx Ferree), which offers an intersectional methodology to address the complex dimensions of analysis in sociological research. She has also translated Patricia Hill Collins’s Black Feminist Thought into Korean.

The Colloquium is free and open to public. Light refreshments will be provided.

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IU Cinema Screening

As One

2012 Directed By: Moon Hyeon Seong

Not Rated          

Drama, Sport 127 Minutes

Overcoming decades of hostility and war, North and South Korea unite to form a unified women’s table tennis team to compete in an Asian tournament. Though the players initially find it impossible to work together as a team, they overcome their differences in spite of multiple obstacles to achieve their goal. As One highlights the power of sports to bring otherwise conflicting parties together. In Korean and Japanese with English subtitles. (2K DCP Presentation)

Free but ticketed. Please visit www.cinema.indiana.edu to request a ticket.

Date: Sunday, February 4, 2018

3:00pm

Location: IU Cinema

This event is cosponsored by the Department of Business Law and Ethics and IU Cinema.

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Institute for Korean Studies Colloquium Series

Between Freedom and Death: Female Taxi Drivers and Authoritarian Development in South Korea, 1960s-1980s

Todd Henry (Associate Professor, Department of History, University of California San Diego)

Made possible with funding from the Academy of Korean Studies

Date: Friday, February 16, 2018

12:00 noon-1:30pm

Location: GISB Room 2067

Todd A. Henry is a specialist of modern Korea with a focus on the period of Japanese rule (1910-1945). He is also interested in social and cultural formations linking post-Asia-Pacific War South Korea, North Korea, and Japan (1945-present) within the geopolitical contexts of American militarism and the Cold War. Dr. Henry has written a book on public spaces and colonial power in Seoul and several articles on Japanese colonialism in Korea. He is currently working on a transnational study of authoritarian development in South Korea (1948-1993) that examines the ideological functions and subcultural dynamics of queerness, especially as they relate to tabloid journalism and medical science, Hot War modes of kinship and citizenship, and globalized discourses and practices of the “sexual revolution.” Dr. Henry has received two Fulbright grants (Kyoto University, 2004-2005; Hanyang and Ewha Women's Universities, 2013) and two fellowships from the Korea Foundation (Seoul National University, 2003-2004; Harvard University, 2008-2009). At UCSD, he is an affiliate faculty member of the Program in Critical Gender Studies (CGS) and the director of the Program in Transnational Korean Studies, the recipient of a five-year (2013-2018) $600,000 grant from the Academy of Korean Studies as a Core University Program for Korean Studies (CUPKS).Date: Friday, February 16, 2018

The Colloquium is free and open to public. Light refreshments will be provided.

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Institute for Korean Studies Colloquium Series

Indigenizing Forensic Texts and Knowledge in Chosŏn Korea

Jisoo Kim (Director of GW Institute for Korean Studies; Korea Foundation Associate Professor of History, International Affairs, and East Asian Languages and Literatures, George Washington University)

Made possible with funding from the Academy of Korean Studies

Date: Friday, March 2, 2018

12:00 noon-1:30pm

Location: GISB Room 2067

Jisoo Kim is a specialist in gender and legal history of early modern Korea. Her broader research interests include crime and justice, forensic medicine, history of emotions, literary representations of the law, diglossia, vernacular, and gender and sexuality. Her first book, The Emotions of Justice: Gender, Status, and Legal Performance in Chosŏn Korea (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2015), which received the 2017 James B. Palais Book Prize, traces the discourse of emotions in the realm of law and examines how the narrative of wŏn (冤) or the sense of being wronged played a crucial role in seeking and performing justice. She is currently working on a book project, tentatively titled Crime of Violence: Forensic Medicine, Dead Bodies, and Legal Culture in Early Modern Korea.

The Colloquium is free and open to public. Light refreshments will be provided.

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Korean Night speaker

Beyond Spectacular: Dissent and Minority Politics in Korea

Judy Han – Assistant Professor, Department of Gender Studies, UCLA

Date: Saturday, April 7, 2018

12:30 – 1:45 pm, location TBD

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Events Held Fall Semester

Institute for Korean Studies Colloquium Series

The Hot and Cold Wars between the Two Koreas

Dr. Ria Chae

Made possible with funding from the Academy of Korean Studies

 

Date: Friday, September 15, 2017

12:00 noon-1:30pm

Location: GISB Room 2067

With North Korea’s missile and nuclear weapons tests and its incessant threat rhetoric, the Korean Peninsula often seems to be in a precarious situation to outsiders. However, when in South Korea, they may be surprised how little they can feel the military tensions and how small the concern about the issue is among the general public. Are outsiders falling victim to the sensationalism of the international media? Or have South Koreans simply become numb to the danger? The latter interpretation seems more plausible given that the uneasy peace on the Korean Peninsula today hinges on the Armistice Agreement signed over sixty years ago to enforce a ceasefire in the Korean War (1950–1953). This presentation, however, reveals that the current pattern of inter-Korean relations first emerged during the détente period of the 1970s and closely resembles the Cold War behavior of the United States and the Soviet Union. An examination of the evolution of inter-Korean relations from a “hot” conflict to a cold war not only offers clues to interpreting the current situation on the Korean Peninsula but also opens an inquiry into common patterns in the diversity of forms the Cold War took in different regions of the globe.

The Colloquium is free and open to public. Light refreshments will be provided.

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Institute for Korean Studies Colloquium Series

Cold War Culture in Postcolonial South Korea

Charles Kim

Made possible with funding from the Academy of Korean Studies

Date: Friday, September 29,2017

12:00 noon-1:30pm

Location: GISB Room 2067

Charles Kim is an associate professor in the History Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research focuses on narratives, memory, and media in 20th-century South Korea. He will discuss his recent book Youth for Nation: Culture and Protest in Cold War South Korea (University of Hawai’i), which examines the refiguring of South Korean public discourse in the years after the Korean War. Through an examination of magazines and film, his talk will reveal how 1950s-60s youths were called on to serve as the exemplars of a cultural conservatism that was to be at the heart of postcolonial nation building. This conservatism was shaped by the exigencies of Cold War politics, socioeconomic crisis, and national identity formation.

The Colloquium is free and open to public. Light refreshments will be provided.

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Institute for Korean Studies Colloquium Series

Curative Violence: How to Inhabit the Time Machine with Disability

Eunjung Kim (Assistant Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies, Disability Studies Program, Syracuse University)

Co-sponsored by the East Asian Studies Center

Date: Friday, November 3, 2017

12:00 noon-1:15pm

Location: GISB Room 2067

The Colloquium is free and open to public. Light refreshments will be provided.

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Institute for Korean Studies Colloquium Series

The Development of Research Integrity and the Regulatory System in Korea: Research Involving Human Participants

Byung-in Choe (Chair of the Department of Institutional Review & Research Ethics and Associate Dean of the Nicholas Cardinal Cheong Graduate School for Life, The Catholic University of Korea)

Made possible with funding from the Academy of Korean Studies

Date: Thursday, November 9, 2017

4:00pm-5:00pm

Location: GISB Room 1060

The Colloquium is free and open to public. Light refreshments will be provided.

Questions? Email iks@indiana.edu.

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Film Series: “The Films of Byun Young-joo”

Habitual Sadness (낮은목소2)

Date: Monday, October 9

6:00-7:00pm Reception

7:00pm Screening followed by a Q & A with the director

Location: GISB Auditorium

During World War II an estimated 200,000 Korean women were forced into sexual slavery by the Japanese Imperial Army. Those who survived the war lived with their memories for decades in silence and shame. As their stories began to emerge in the 1990s, Director Byun made a trilogy of films documenting the past and present lives of these former "comfort women."  Byun's films helped advance the women's demands for a formal apology and compensation from the Japanese government. Habitual Sadness (1997), the second film in the trilogy, was initiated at the request of the women, who asked Byun to film the last days of a survivor "who had been diagnosed with cancer. In this film the women are seen gaining self-confidence, eventually moving behind the camera themselves to utilize the medium of film as a means of both protest and healing" (Darcy Paquet).  The films have been widely acclaimed for their aesthetic and emotional power.

The Statue of Peace (Representing the Korean Women Forced into Sexual Slavery by the Japanese Imperial Army in World War II)

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Helpless (화차)

Date: Monday, October 16

7:00pm Screening

Location: GISB Auditorium 

A psychological mystery/thriller based on the bestselling novel All She Was Worth (火車, lit. "Fire Chariot") by Japanese writer Miyabe Miyuki. A young woman disappears shortly before her wedding, and, as her fiancé attempts to locate her, he gradually learns about her dark past. The movie has been described as a “tragic love story that culminates in a satisfying resolution” (Kyu Hyun Kim), while it also addresses contemporary social problems such as loan sharking and organized crime.  Helpless won several awards and sold 2.4 million tickets in Korea, making it Director Byun’s biggest box-office hit yet.

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Assessing Korean Democratization and Democracy:

From Molotov Cocktails to Candle Lights

Made possible with funding from the Dr. Lee Se Ung Distinguished Lecture Series on Korean Global Affairs

(Riot Police Shields in Seoul)

Date: Friday, October 20, 2017

Location: GISB Auditorium 

Indiana University, Bloomington

What is the present state of South Korean democracy? Ranked 24th—just after France—in the 2016 Democracy Index, South Korea until recently had been hailed as a successful case of democracy building in Asia, with the South Korean government even seeking to export the Korean democratization model to developing countries on the wings of the Korean Wave. After almost four decades of authoritarian rule, the country gradually democratized, first by having a free and fair direct presidential election in 1987, then by transferring authority to a civilian president in 1992, and finally by having a representative of the opposition party win presidency in 1997. Without a doubt, building and maintaining a democracy is a process rather than a one-time event, and the South Korean democracy has experienced many challenges in the last two decades. Yet, the past year has arguably been the most turbulent as the country went through the shocks of corruption scandals and investigations involving the largest conglomerates, presidential aides, and the president herself, climaxing in her impeachment and imprisonment. Do the recent events reveal irreparable flaws in Korean democracy or do they, particularly the instrumental role played by the civil society, indicate vibrancy and progress? Can we compare the six months of protests, at times 7 million-strong, to the June 1987 democratization movement, or is it more appropriate to see them as another example of the rampant worldwide populist challenge to the establishment? We will host scholars and former US ambassadors to Korea at IU, and invite them to share their experiences, interpretations, and hopes for Korean democracy as it reaches its 20th—or, depending on the criterion applied, 30th—anniversary.

The conference will be hosted by Indiana University’s Institute for Korean Studies as part of the celebratory events to mark one year since the Institute’s inauguration.

10:30-12:00         Keynote Speech

                                Dr. Bruce Cumings,  Gustavus F. and Ann M. Swift Distinguished Service Professor in

                                History and the College, University of Chicago

12:00-1:15           Lunch

1:30-3:45              Academic Presentation

                                Dr. Paul Chang, Assistant Professor, Sociology, Harvard University

                                Dr. Taegyun Park, Professor of Korean Studies and Associate

                                Dean, Graduate School of International Studies, Seoul National University.

                                Dr. Youngju Ryu, Associate Professor, Modern Korean Literature,

                                University of Michigan

3:45-4:15              Coffee Break

4:15-5:30              Policy Discussion

                                 Ambassador Kathleen Stephens

                                 Moderator: Dean Lee Feinstein

5:30-6:30              Reception

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