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How to Recognize Plagiarism

Word-for-word

Example 3 of 5

Word-for-word plagiarism is committed when a writer takes a sequence of 7 or more words from another source, but fails to identify the quoted passage, fails to provide the full in-text citation crediting the author(s), and fails to provide the bibliographic reference.

Read the example carefully!

Original Source Material: The concept of systems is really quite simple. The basic idea is that a system has parts that fit together to make a whole; but where it gets complicated -- and interesting -- is how those parts are connected or related to each other. Source: Frick, T. (1991). Restructuring education through technology. Bloomington, IN: Phi Delta Kappa Educational Foundation.
Plagiarized Version Correct Version

A system has parts that fit together to make a whole, but the important aspect of systems is how those parts are connected or related to each other (Frick, 1991).

Reference:

Frick, T. (1991). Restructuring education through technology. Bloomington, IN: Phi Delta Kappa Educational Foundation.

Frick (1991) states that "... a system has parts that fit together to make a whole ..." but the important aspect of systems is "... how those parts are connected or related to each other" (p. 17).

Reference:

Frick, T. (1991). Restructuring education through technology. Bloomington, IN: Phi Delta Kappa Educational Foundation.

Explanation: This version is word-for-word plagiarism. Although the original author is cited at the end of the paragraph, the student copied word-for-word from the original source material and did not use quotation marks.

This passage appears to be paraphrased by the writer. A reader cannot tell which words are the writer's and which words are Frick's (the original author), even though the reference is provided.

Explanation: Note that the correct version begins by citing the author and year of the publication, as well as the location of the quoted words at the end of the quote. Quotation marks are used to indicate that these are word-for-word quotes from the original author. The original author is also listed in the reference.

So now the reader can tell which words came from the writer and which words came from another author and where those words can be found.

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