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How to Recognize Plagiarism

Word-for-word

Example 4 of 5

Word-for-word plagiarism is committed when a writer takes a sequence of 7 or more words from another source, but fails to identify the quoted passage, fails to provide the full in-text citation crediting the author(s), and fails to provide the bibliographic reference.

Read the example carefully!

Original Source Material: Theories differ from philosophies and models of teaching. A philosophy is a value system, whereas a theory seeks to explain real-world events and can be certified through scientific investigation. Models of teaching are approaches to the management of some aspect of classroom instruction and they may not be independent of subject area, grade level, age of the student, or the setting for learning. A characteristic of learning theories is that they address the underlying psychological dynamics of events. Thus, they provide a mechanism for understanding the implications of events related to learning in both formal and informal settings. Source: Gredler, M. E. (2001). Learning and instruction: Theory into practice (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
Plagiarized Version Correct Version

Theories and philosophies are different from each other because theories seek to explain real-world events and can be certified through scientific investigation. Learning theories address the underlying psychological dynamics of events, so they provide a mechanism for understanding the implications of events related to learning in both formal and informal settings.

Theories and philosophies are different from each other because, according to Gredler (2001), theories seek:

to explain real-world events and can be certified through scientific investigation... A characteristic of learning theories is that they address the underlying psychological dynamics of events. Thus, they provide a mechanism for understanding the implications of events related to learning in both formal and informal settings. (pp. 12-13)

Reference:

Gredler, M. E. (2001). Learning and instruction: Theory into practice (4th Ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Explanation: This version is word-for-word plagiarism. The student took two passages from the original work and inserted them into his or her writing. This is still an example of word-for-word plagiarism. No credit was given to the author in the text and quotation marks were not used, and also the work was not listed in the reference, which is also missing here.

There is no way for a reader to tell that some words are those of the student writer and other words come from a different author. The passage appears to be words the student wrote and the student's own ideas. This is deception, because the student is using someone else's ideas and words without proper acknowledgement.

Explanation: An indented block is used to indicate that this passage is a word-for-word quotation and the pages from where it was taken in the original document. The original author of the content is cited at the beginning of the passage, which in effect also points to the reference.

Note that an indented block is a convention for APA style when the quote is more than 40 words. While quotation marks are not used for this block, a reader can still easily tell whose words are whose in this passage. If you use another style, be sure to follow it for how direct quotes, citations and references should be handled. We use APA style for examples in this tutorial and on the tests. Quoted passages on the test are always less than 40 words, and so quotation marks should be present for non-plagiarized student versions.

 

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