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How to Recognize Plagiarism

Plagiarism Pattern: Triple D--Disguised Disconnected Dupe

Definition

A disguised disconnected dupe is a word-for-word plagiarizer who takes text from another author but makes it appear to be proper paraphrasing, except it is a verbatim quote and lacks quotation marks, lacks the full in-text citation with locator, and lacks the reference.

Original Source Material:

Five first principles are elaborated: (a) Learning is promoted when learners are engaged in solving real-world problems. (b) Learning is promoted when existing knowledge is activated as a foundation for new knowledge. (c) Learning is promoted when new knowledge is demonstrated to the learner. (d) Learning is promoted when new knowledge is applied by the learner. (e) Learning is promoted when new knowledge is integrated into the learner’s world.

Source:

Merrill, M. D. (2002). First principles of instruction. Educational Technology Research and Development, 50(3), 43-59.

Plagiarized Version: Correct Version: Not plagiarized

Merrill (2002) claims that learning is promoted when students are engaged in solving real-world problems, existing knowledge is activated as a foundation for new knowledge, new knowledge is demonstrated to the learner, new knowledge is applied by the learner, and when new knowledge is integrated into the learner’s world.

Merrill (2002) claims that "learning is promoted when students are engaged in solving real-world problems, ... existing knowledge is activated as a foundation for new knowledge, ... new knowledge is demonstrated to the learner, ... new knowledge is applied by the learner, and ... when new knowledge is integrated into the learner’s world" (p. 43).

Reference:

Merrill, M. D. (2002). First principles of instruction. Educational Technology Research and Development, 50(3), 43-59.

Explanation: This is word-for-word plagiarism because seven or more words are copied from the source, there are no quotation marks, there is no full in-text citation, and there is no reference. The citation implies that this a paraphrase, but this is actually word-for-word plagiarism, masquerading as a paraphrase.

If this were a paraphrase, it would be a placeless paraphrase due to the missing reference (i.e., still plagiarism).

Explanation: Merrill is credited by use of quotation marks around his words (punctuation and ellipses added), full in-text citation with the locator, and by the full bibliographic reference.

See full list of plagiarism patterns.