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How to Recognize Plagiarism

Plagiarism Practice Tests


Please note:


Item 1

In the case below, the original source material is given along with a sample of student work. Determine the type of plagiarism by clicking the appropriate radio button.

Original Source Material

Student Version

Complex learning is the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes; coordinating qualitatively different constituent skills; and often transferring what was learned in school or training to daily life and work. There are many examples of theoretical design models that have been developed to promote complex learning: cognitive apprenticeship, collaborative problem solving, constructivism and constructivist learning environments, learning by doing, multiple approaches to understanding , star legacy , as well as the subject of this contribution, the Four-Component Instructional Design model.

 

References:
van Merriënboer, J. J. G. & Kirschner, P. A. K. (2007). Ten steps to complex learning: A systematic approach to four-component instructional design. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., Mahwah, NJ.

 

Van Merriënboer and Kirschner (2007) indicated that complex learning involves the learning of how to complete authentic tasks which require the use and integration of knowledge and skills from multiple domains. Complex learning tasks have no single correct method of completion but instead a range of methods that result in the completion of the task at varying degrees of appeal, efficiency, and effectiveness. They further state that complex learning involves "the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes; coordinating qualitatively different constituent skills, and often transferring what was learned ... to daily life and work" (p. 4).

 

References:
van Merriënboer, J. J. G. & Kirschner, P. A. K. (2007). Ten steps to complex learning: A systematic approach to four-component instructional design. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., Mahwah, NJ.

Which of the following is true for the Student Version above?

 

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Item 2

In the case below, the original source material is given along with a sample of student work. Determine the type of plagiarism by clicking the appropriate radio button.

Original Source Material

Student Version

The game-based laboratory was vastly different from their expectations and experiences of a typical laboratory; this might have resulted in the students being disconnected from the learning aspect of the game. However, the students' comments suggested that their discomfort with the video game was due to the fact that they did not perceive that a video game could really be educational. The game became a disruption to their traditional ways of science learning and interfered with how they perceived the learning experience. This perspective is potentially problematic as it suggests that pedagogical disruptions such as video games that are designed to be powerful learning tools simply may not work for all students.

References:
Anderson, J. L., & Barnett, M. (2013). Learning Physics with Digital Game Simulations in Middle School Science. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 1-13.

 

Since a game-based laboratory provides a virtual environment with different experiences than in a real lab, students may fail to connect these virtual experiences to real lab experiences. Student and teacher beliefs that games are entertainment tools, not educational tools, may minimize the potential of video games intended to help students learn science.

 

 

References:
Anderson, J. L., & Barnett, M. (2013). Learning Physics with Digital Game Simulations in Middle School Science. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 1-13.

Which of the following is true for the Student Version above?

 

Hints



Item 3

In the case below, the original source material is given along with a sample of student work. Determine the type of plagiarism by clicking the appropriate radio button.

Original Source Material

Student Version

Learning is a complex set of processes that may vary according to the developmental level of the learner, the nature of the task, and the context in which the learning is to occur. As already indicated, no one theory can capture all the variables involved in learning.

References:
Gredler, M. E. (2001). Learning and instruction: Theory into practice (4th Ed.). Upper Saddle, NJ: Prentice-Hall.


A learning theory, there, comprises a set of constructs linking observed changes in performance with what is thought to bring about those changes.

References:
Driscoll, M. P. (2000). Psychology of learning for instruction (2nd Ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

A learning theory is made up of "a set of constructs linking observed changes in performance with whatever is thought to bring about those changes" (Driscoll, 2000). Therefore, since "learning is a complex set of processes that may vary according to the developmental level of the learner, the nature of the task, and the context in which the learning is to occur, it is apparent that no one theory can capture all the variables involved in learning" (Gredler, 2001).

Which of the following is true for the Student Version above?

 

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