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How to Recognize Plagiarism

Plagiarism Practice Tests


Please note:


Item 1

In the case below, the original source material is given along with a sample of student work. Determine the type of plagiarism by clicking the appropriate radio button.

Original Source Material

Student Version

Complex learning is the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes; coordinating qualitatively different constituent skills; and often transferring what was learned in school or training to daily life and work. There are many examples of theoretical design models that have been developed to promote complex learning: cognitive apprenticeship, collaborative problem solving, constructivism and constructivist learning environments, learning by doing, multiple approaches to understanding , star legacy , as well as the subject of this contribution, the Four-Component Instructional Design model.

 

References:
van Merriënboer, J. J. G. & Kirschner, P. A. K. (2007). Ten steps to complex learning: A systematic approach to four-component instructional design. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., Mahwah, NJ.

 

Van Merriënboer and Kirschner (2007) indicated that complex learning involves the learning of how to complete authentic tasks which require the use and integration of knowledge and skills from multiple domains. Complex learning tasks have no single correct method of completion but instead a range of methods that result in the completion of the task at varying degrees of appeal, efficiency, and effectiveness. They further state that complex learning involves "the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes; coordinating qualitatively different constituent skills, and often transferring what was learned ... to daily life and work" (p. 4).

 

References:
van Merriënboer, J. J. G. & Kirschner, P. A. K. (2007). Ten steps to complex learning: A systematic approach to four-component instructional design. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., Mahwah, NJ.

Which of the following is true for the Student Version above?

 

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Item 2

In the case below, the original source material is given along with a sample of student work. Determine the type of plagiarism by clicking the appropriate radio button.

Original Source Material

Student Version

Major changes within organizations are usually initiated by those who are in power. Such decision-makers sponsor the change and then appoint someone else - perhaps the director of training - to be responsible for implementing and managing change. Whether the appointed change agent is in training development or not, there is often the implicit assumption that training will "solve the problem." And, indeed, training may solve part of the problem....  The result is that potentially effective innovations suffer misuse, or even no use, in the hands of uncommitted users.

References:
Dormant, D. (1986). The ABCDs of managing change. In Introduction to Performance Technology (p. 238-256). Washington, D.C.: National Society of Performance and Instruction.

When major changes are initiated in organizations, "... there is often the implicit assumption that training will 'solve the problem.'  And, indeed, training may solve part of the problem." (Dormant, 1986, p. 238).

 




References:
Dormant, D. (1986). The ABCDs of managing change. In Introduction to Performance Technology (p. 238-256). Washington, D.C.: National Society of Performance and Instruction.

Which of the following is true for the Student Version above?

 

Hints



Item 3

In the case below, the original source material is given along with a sample of student work. Determine the type of plagiarism by clicking the appropriate radio button.

Original Source Material

Student Version

Use of mainstream games in schools remains rare, and is unlikely to be integrated into the curriculum. Reasons for this include:

  • it is difficult for teachers to identify quickly how a particular game is relevant to some component of the statutory curriculum, as well as the accuracy and appropriateness of the content within the game
  • the difficulty in persuading other school stakeholders as to the potential/actual educational benefits of computer games
  • the lack of time available to teachers to familiarize themselves with the game, and methods of producing the best results from its use
  • the amount of irrelevant content or functionality in a game which could not be removed or ignored, thus wasting valuable lesson time.

References:
Kirriemuir, J., & McFarlane, A. (2004). Literature review in games and learning: A report forNESTA Futurelab. Retrieved from http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/19/04/53/PDF/kirriemuir-j-2004-r8.pdf

Kirriemuir and McFarlane (2004) reported that the use of mainstream games in K-12 education is and will probably remain rare for several reasons. Evaluating a game's relevance to curriculum and accuracy of content is difficult and time-consuming. They further assert that a mainstream game which is applicable to curriculum standards will likely include irrelevant content. Finally, most teachers are not familiar with methods for using mainstream games in instruction.

 

 

 

References:
Kirriemuir, J., & McFarlane, A. (2004). Literature review in games and learning: A report forNESTA Futurelab. Retrieved from http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/19/04/53/PDF/kirriemuir-j-2004-r8.pdf

Which of the following is true for the Student Version above?

 

Hints