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How to Recognize Plagiarism

Practice: 3 of 10

Please read the original source material carefully and then select the entry, either (A) or (B), that you think has not been plagiarized.

Original Source Material: Instructional design theory requires at least two components: methods for facilitating human learning and development (which are also called methods of instruction), and indications as to when and when not to use these methods (which I call situations). Although the term "context" has a similar meaning in lay language and is often used in education, not all aspects of the context influence which methods should be used. Therefore, I use the term "situation" to refer to those aspects of the context that do influence selection of methods.

Source: Reigeluth, C. M. (1999). What is instructional design theory and how is it changing? In C. M. Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional-design theories and models volume II: A new paradigm of instructional theory. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

(A) Two components must be present in an instructional design theory. The first component is methods for facilitating human learning and development. The second is those aspects of the context that do influence selection of methods, or the situation.

Reference:

Reigeluth, C. M. (1999). What is instructional design theory and how is it changing? In C. M. Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional-design theories and models volume II: A new paradigm of instructional theory. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

(B) Two components must be present in an instructional design theory. The first component (methods) describes how human learning will be supported, and the second component (situation) describes when certain methods ought to be used (Reigeluth, 1999).

Reference:

Reigeluth, C. M. (1999). What is instructional design theory and how is it changing? In C. M. Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional-design theories and models volume II: A new paradigm of instructional theory. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

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