NAQP… K9IU On AIR;

K9IU was  ON AIR participating in North America QSO Party.

Final score:  Total Points = 16,380

 

Total Contacts by Band and Mode:   note first time to have all band access with new antennas !

Band QSO  %Total

160    6   3
80   30  15
40  106 54
20    29  16
15     22  11
10       2   1
— —– — —– —
Total Q’s     195

K9IU President and IU Student Ryan Cutshall, KD9DAB mans the new Icom IC-7300 – radio was purchased through a generous ARRL Foundation Grant that was just approved ! Thanks Newington. We are contest ready and radio active !
KB9YOJ discusses antenna theory with the club while waiting his chance to pilot the station during NAQP – SSB.

 

NQ9L and KC9YSG pose in front of the new ARRL-funded Icom IC-7300 ! Thank you ARRL. K9IU has been a continuous ARRL dues paying club since the early 1960’s. Thank you for reciprocating our decades of dues-paying loyalty with a generous Foundation Grant to help us fund some new equipment and keep students ON AIR !
Behind Door number 3… actually, behind door #677 at the Indiana Memorial Union. The K9IU ham shack! What’s inside? Our HF station, a small server room and a hacker’s space for experimenting and building electronic / ham projects. It’s small but it works !

 

73 DE K9IU

 

 

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Tour of the old Russian Duga 3 aka the Woodpecker

A bit of  ham radio history:

For hams who were active back in the  1970’s through the 1980’s on any HF band, an often annoying interference was heard day and night. This interference was commonly known as the Woodpecker because it cycled on and off in 16hz increments and sounded..well…like ole’ woody woodpecker….tap tap tap tap tap.   I was so loud that it could easily drown out WWV’s time signal.   What was woody ?     It was a long range, over the horizon radar system near Chernobyl, and was designed to bounce radar signals off the ionosphere and deep into the USA to detect potential nuclear missile launches aimed toward the Soviet Union using back scatter off of the ionosphere.   For USA hams, it was simply annoying QRM.   Eventually, various gadgets were created to tackle the Woodpecker.

 

AEA made a device called the “Moscow Muffler” which would sync with the woodpecker and notch it out of your receiver.  It worked, somewhat, but not entirely.   Eventually, hams learned to simply switch over to CW and send a string of dits for 20 seconds or so.  Apparently, this would confuse the radar (getting a false echo bounce) and the radar sweep would move to another part of the radio spectrum.

At 5 megawatts (5 million watts) of power, it’s no wonder the $89 “Moscow Muffler” didn’t exactly work as hoped…. The huge transmitter used nearly 25% of the entire power output of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant.

The DUGA- 3 OTH (over the horizon) radar was decommissioned in 1989, as the cold war came to an end and a new era of Peristroyka ushered in historic changes to, and then the collapes of,  the Soviet Union.

The 1980’s were  a fun time in ham radio.   QSL cards from the cold-war soviet union were sometimes difficult to get and always prized.   They were often printed on very thin paper (recycled) and were quite colorful and creative despite the obvious scarcity of resources.    All cards were strictly monitored, and to QSL, one had to send a “green stamp” (dollar bill) or an IRC (international reply coupon) to PO Box 88, Moscow, Russia, USSR.    Those indeed w

Here is a youtube video of a lady who is visiting the infamous DUGA-3 radar antenna site.      She does a remarkable job in the video to show the massive size of this antenna.

 

And the original woodpecker in action as heard over WWV:

Finally, a bit more about DUGA-3

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Mesh Networks over Ham Radio….

From QRZ.com:  This video will explain mesh networking over ham radio. Imagine taking old consumer wireless routers that are available everywhere, especially finding stacks of them at hamfests for next to nothing, and flashing them with new firmware and turning them into ham nodes, which auto join and auto configure to connect us all to our own internet-like infrastructure. A must have for emergency communications, and a good watch for fun as well….

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Link to the Icom IC-7300 Resources page

A good link to the Icom IC-7300 SDR HF+6M radio resource pages.  Tons of first hand user info on this page.  http://g3nrw.net/IC-7300/

And here is a good link to get your IC-7300 up and running on digital modes: https://wa7ewc.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/icom-ic-7300-digital-mode-settings/

Did you know, the IC-7300’s spectrum display can be used with N1MM contesting software to allow for “big screen” panadapter display?  Check it out:  http://n1mm.hamdocs.com/tiki-index.php?page=Spectrum+Display+Window

Finally, a quick help guide to setting up your spectrum display:  http://oz1qx.dk/IC-7300/ic7300_scope.pdf

 

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Bouvet Island Dxpedition – are u ready? 3y0z

Bouvet Island Dxpedition kicks off late January

Thee Yankee Zero Zulu…   listening up…

It is the most isolated spot in the whole world – a fact which anyone who cares to spend an instructive five minutes with a pair of dividers and a good globe can easily verify. Around Bouvet Island, it is possible to draw a circle of one thousand miles radius (having an area of 3,146,000 square miles, or very nearly that of Europe) which contains no other land whatever. No other point of land on the earth’s surface has this peculiarity.

It’s also #2 on the DXCC most wanted list.     Come join us as we bust the pileup and work 3Y0Z from the K9IU ham shack !

https://www.bouvetdx.org

Sure to bring out the best of DXers world wide (and a few kids, lids, and slims too)

whats unique?

 

It’s a rare one   Last  activation was back in 2008 .

Also the timing of the expedition is a bit unusual – we are at sunspot minimum- these guys are spending big bucks to do a Dxpedition with the sun isn’t spotting     -probably a bucket list thing.  No time like now –  just the same they’re gonna have fun and make lots and lots of QSO’s !

We of course wish them fair winds and safe travels, and especially good propagation !!

 

73 de K9IU

 

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Repeater Mapping Online – Hypothetical Radio Coverage Maps

With all the work on the K9IU repeaters, a few of us got curious about coverage and some what-if’s with respect to antenna gain, height above terrain, power output and more.  Check out this cool program for repeater mapping – free and web based:

http://lrcov.crc.ca/main/index.php

Here is a sample of the coverage of the K9IU VHF repeater according to the computer.  Coverage is actually a bit better than what the computer depicts.   Interesting none the less.

As a reminder, K9IU is hosting analog and digital repeaters which provide traditional analog VHF FM,  as well as C4FM System Fusion (VHF),  D-Star Digital (VHF and UHF) and DMR (UHF) repeaters.

Please consider to join K9IU – dues are just $20/year and all funds go to expand the club’s radio room / ham shack equipment and repeater system.  We hope to raise enough funds to keep improving our repeaters and do some experimenting, adding back an IRLP/Echolink node and cross linking the digital – analog systems.

 

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D-Star VHF K9IU Repeater back on air – now @ 146.940 Mhz

We completed maintenance today to get the K9IU VHF D-Star Repeater back online.     It’s currently up and running in local mode until the node controller (a raspberry pi) is configured.

Note the D-Star list is in need of update, for Bloomington we have the 146.940/(146.340 input) VHF repeater and the 444.900/(449.900 input) D-STAR on UHF.

IMPORTANT: Don’t forget to change your D-star repeater config in your radio accordingly, the list from Icom/D-Star Info is incorrect and outdated.

The UHF D-Star repeater is also on air but in local mode for now.   Also awaiting the raspberry Pi node configuration.

Reflector 024 should be back soon !  The trick?  A 20 year old windows xp notebook –  driver works !

Thanks to Matt KB9YOJ  and Corey KB9JHU for help getting us back on air !

73 DE  K9IU

 

 

 

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Indiana Hoosier Safe-T P25 – Live ! Streaming Link Online

Interested in monitoring the P25 Public Service SAFE-T systems ?    Click here for Monroe and Brown County towers at Bloomington, Hindustan, Knights Ridge, Nashville, and Bedford;  The feed covers Indiana State Police, DNR southern region,  Monroe and Brown County PD/Fire/EMS,  Bloomington, Nashville City PD, IU PD,  Brown and Monroe County Fire and EMS dispatch and a few other miscellaneous services.   Tactical channels are not included (to protect those who protect us) :

http://www.broadcastify.com/listen/feed/26148

Also, as amateur radio operators, we are allowed to use public service monitoring equipment while stationary, mobile, and foot-portable. Here is the link the applicable Indiana State law regulating use of said equipment.

It pays to have an amateur radio license for lots of reasons, this being one of them!    See IC IC 35-44.1-2-7 below.

http://iga.in.gov/legislative/laws/2017/ic/titles/035#35-44.1-2-7

IC 35-44.1-2-7 Unlawful use of a police radio

Sec. 7. (a) A person who knowingly or intentionally:

(1) possesses a police radio;

(2) transmits over a frequency assigned for police emergency purposes; or

(3) possesses or uses a police radio:

(A) while committing a crime;

(B) to further the commission of a crime; or

(C) to avoid detection by a law enforcement agency;

commits unlawful use of a police radio, a Class B misdemeanor.

(b) Subsection (a)(1) and (a)(2) do not apply to:

(1) a governmental entity;

(2) a regularly employed law enforcement officer;

(3) a common carrier of persons for hire whose vehicles are used in emergency service;

(4) a public service or utility company whose vehicles are used in emergency service;

(5) a person who has written permission from the chief executive officer of a law enforcement agency to possess a police radio;

(6) a person who holds an amateur radio license issued by the Federal Communications Commission if the person is not transmitting over a frequency assigned for police emergency purposes;

(7) a person who uses a police radio only in the person’s dwelling or place of business;

(8) a person:

(A) who is regularly engaged in newsgathering activities;

(B) who is employed by a newspaper qualified to receive legal advertisements under IC 5-3-1, a wire service, or a licensed commercial or public radio or television station; and

(C) whose name is furnished by the person’s employer to the chief executive officer of a law enforcement agency in the county in which the employer’s principal office is located;

(9) a person engaged in the business of manufacturing or selling police radios; or

(10) a person who possesses or uses a police radio during the normal course of the person’s lawful business.

(c) As used in this section, “police radio” means a radio that is capable of sending or receiving signals transmitted on frequencies assigned by the Federal Communications Commission for police emergency purposes and that:

(1) can be installed, maintained, or operated in a vehicle; or

(2) can be operated while it is being carried by an individual.

The term does not include a radio designed for use only in a dwelling.

 

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