Indiana University Bloomington

Movement, Migration and Change: Examining Mobilities through Archival Research, Part Two

  

April 5, 2019
12:00 p.m.

Hoagy Carmichael Room              
Morrison Hall 006

  

Join us Friday, April 5, at 12 pm in the Hoagy Carmichael Room for the second in a two-part series that examines the relationship between music and mobilities. This second session will feature presentations by two IU Folklore and Ethnomusicology PhD students and one graduate student.

"Migracious" Music: Mobilities Paradigms in the Charles L. Todd and Robert Sonkin Migrant Worker collection, 1940 to 1941

Presented by Kelly Bosworth, PhD Student, Folklore and Ethnomusicology

In 1941, graduate student Charles Todd set out for the Farm Security Adminstration camps in California with a government-issued 80-pound Presto disc recorder, a 65-question “Folksong Questionnaire,” and a note of introduction signed by Alan Lomax. Over two summers, Todd and collaborator Richard Sonkin conducted fieldwork on migrant farming families; the resulting collection is now housed at the Library of Congress. In this paper, I trace the mobilities paradigms of Todd and Sonkin, the experiences of Dust Bowl migrants as expressed in their recorded songs and stories, and reimagine the politics of representation around the creation of this archive and its relevance to current discourses of movement and displacement in the United States.

 

Samba de Roda, Benin, and the Bahian Diaspora in West Africa: The Curious Case of Casimiro D'Almeida

Presented by Charles Exdell, PhD Student, Folklore and Ethnomusicology

On a 1950 recording made by Brazilian musicologist Luiz Heitor Corrêa de Azevedo, Casimiro D’Almeida, a musician from Dahomey, sings rural samba from Bahia, Brazil, at the Musée de
l’Homme in Paris, France. The recording, held at the Archives of Traditional Music, raises the question: why is a musician from West Africa playing samba from Bahia, Brazil, in Paris? Uniting themes of musical movement across the black Atlantic, this talk discusses the significance of the recording in relation to research on the history of Bahian Samba de Roda and its current image as a uniquely Brazilian national heritage, the life of French anthropologist Pierre Verger and his work on 19 th century trans-Atlantic exchanges between Bahia and West Africa, and the musical practices of the descendants of Brazilian returnees in Porto Novo, Benin.

 

Festivals, Genre, and Mobility: Bluegrass from Bean Blossom to the Northwoods

Presented by Hunter Dux, Graduate Student, Folklore and Ethnomusicology

This presentation describes patterns of movement among musicians, fans, and organizers between the Great Northern Bluegrass Festival in Mole Lake, Wisconsin and Bill Monroe's festival in Bean Blossom, Indiana. Drawing on historical, archival, and ethnographic data, I trace how performances and representations of bluegrass change across time and space. My research follows Piper Road Spring Band, the first bluegrass band in Wisconsin, and Hägar Nelson, a fan, musician, and cookie baker. I argue that a close attention to mobility and practice in a music scene (or between scenes), reveals processes of genre change where dominant ideologies are re-imagined in new contexts. 

 

This event is free and open to the public. All are welcome to attend. For more information, call the ATM at (812) 855-4679.

 

Movement, Migration and ChangeExamining Mobilities through Archival Research, Part One

  

March 1, 2019
12:00 p.m.

Hoagy Carmichael Room              
Morrison Hall 006

  

Join us Friday, March 1 at 12 pm in the Hoagy Carmichael Room for the first in a two-part series that examines the relationship between music and mobilities. This first session will feature presentations by two IU Folklore and Ethnomusicology graduate students.

George List: Networks, Transnational Research and Imaginaries of Colombia

Presented by Amelia Lopez, Graduate Student, Folklore and Ethnomusicology

During the 1960s George List conducted research in Northern Colombia about Afro-Colombian musical practices. His research became an important referent for scholars interested in the cultural practices of African-descendant groups in Colombia and Latin  America. Interested in understanding  the influence of scholarship in the construction of imaginaries in Colombia, Lopez examines the transnational networks that List created during his research, and how those networks informed and positioned his work as one of the most relevant for understanding Afro-Colombian music.

  

Perspectives on the Bech Collection: Mobile or Immobile?

Presented by Suyash Kumar Neupane, Graduate Student, Folklore and Ethnomusicology

Housed at the Archives of Traditional Music, Terence Bech’s materials are regarded as one of the most comprehensive field collections from Nepal. Neupane examines the concepts of mobilities and immobilities within the Bech Collection and what role this archival collection may play in contemporary Nepali contexts. He argues that the dynamism and relevancy of archival materials can be better understood when studied through multiple layers of contextual, critical and political information and interpretations.